By on February 10, 2010

What do you sell if you can’t sell a car? Sophisticated commentary on the state of gender relations, of course. Hit the jump to see just how gendered one marketing campaign can get.

Man, those Howie Long ads must have set off some insecurity round Dodge way. Maybe they don’t realize that Howie only thinks Ford trucks are for the effete.

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30 Comments on “What’s Wrong With This Picture: Dodge’s Gender Issues Roll On...”


  • avatar
    friedclams

    I think this ad works. Even the retro typography of “We make getaway cars” is satisfying. What a tagline! That could be the motto of the post WWII US auto industry.
    This is brand-appropriate and speaks to the virtues of the product. A good ad.

  • avatar
    1996MEdition

    Those of us who have experience with internet or blind dates know that this contest does not necessarily exclude the fairer sex….

    • 0 avatar
      NickR

      1996MEdition…thanks for bringing back so many fond memories. >:(

      I will be honest, the only Dodge ad I want to see is the one in where the girl in the green lingerie is applying body lotion. The extended version (if there isn’t one, they should make one).

      Political correctness be damned.

  • avatar
    Lokki

    I think it works, and I like this one a lot better than their other gender based ad shown during the superbowl.

    “Man’s Last Stand”
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWP8Z8Ctpxs

    Having said that, as part of a bigger campaign I think “Man’s Last Stand” works too.

    Their muscle image is the only reason that I can think of to buy a Dodge, noting that Dodge trucks are now part of “Ram” and not really Dodges any more.

    By the way, I hope you have a typo with “Howie only things”

  • avatar
    thalter

    As has been mentioned many times before, Dodge products are not class leading in reliability, fuel efficiency, technology, safety, resale value, sales, or newness. The masculine card is literally the only one they have left.

    Not my cup of tea (I care about the other things I mentioned above), but at least they are trying.

    • 0 avatar
      pgcooldad

      Are you serious? Not class leading in safety? Take a loke at the IIHS top safety picks for 2010 below. I see a Dodge Avenger and Journey, Jeep Patriot and a Chrysler Sebring. I see only two Hondas and ZERO Toyotas.

      You can have reliability, fuel efficiency, technology, resale value, sales, and newness … but when you get in an serious accident none of these matter at all because your going to be dead in your reliable, fuel efficient, tech laden, great resale … newly designed car.

      http://www.iihs.org/ratings/default.aspx

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      You just named three cars,out of how many models? Subaru has every car they sell on that list.

    • 0 avatar
      pgcooldad

      Let’s put this in perspective then. Every single model Subaru makes = four. All four of their vehicles made it. Geez, if you only designed, engineered, and built four models … you better get them right.

      Chrysler is a full vehicle manufacturer that has gone through tremendous problems and still managed four (not three) vehicles.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Other than this being an ad for a Chrysler division, which means the mandatory TTAC “we gotta slag them”, what’s the bitch? I find it hilarious.

    Of course, I also ride a Harley Davidson, spent 15 years flying colors in motorcycle clubs, spent a lot of years (decades ago) in the United Steelworkers, and enjoy PBR and Miller High Life, so maybe my sense of humor is suspect. Just the same, I’ve been enjoying the entire series of Dodge ads. And hope they continue.

    Perhaps you’d rather be watching the Toyota, “please forgive us” ads, instead? They’re definitely more in line with the politically correct world. Or, go and pig out on Audi’s “Green Police.”

  • avatar
    86er

    I was going to write some long treatise on all this, as it is one of my hobby horses.

    Instead, I’ll hope brevity is the soul of wit indeed.

    Lord hopes that all of this crap is facetious, otherwise there is something very rotten in the State of Denmark.

  • avatar
    obbop

    Still recall the white-bikini-clad babe posing alongside the Plum Crazy Challenger.

    Luscious.

    SO females are mere objects to me. Sue me!!!!

  • avatar
    Martin Schwoerer

    I think it works, too. In contrast to the other Dodge ad, there is no whinyness here, no cheap escapism. Instead, we see a sexy girl who is modern in the sense that she embodies the androgynous virtues of restraint and poise. When you have sangfroid like a female Steve McQueen you can let it rip, at least on special occasions (and this sure looks special to me).

  • avatar
    getacargetacheck

    Psychologists have known since Freud that men are insecure about their penises and that women are insecure about not having a penis. Car marketers USED to understand this. Apparently the creative minds at Wieden+Kennedy still do. Unfortunately, it’s sad that we have so many little boys running around who find these ads funny, or worse relevant to their own lives. Where have the real men gone?

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      See? I can’t tell if that was facetious, either!

      *head explodes*

    • 0 avatar
      getacargetacheck

      86er, no I was not being facetious. The Charger ads are legitimate. However, the idea that these ads will resonate with a large group of men (and women) and that these people will identify with the actors simply shows how emasculated American/Canadian men have become. Charger drivers apparently feel like sissies, are bitter about the control women in their lives exercise over them, and, in the final analysis, feel like their only sense of manhood is in the car they drive. Pathetic. Charger driver = cuckold. Charger driver’s wife/girlfriend/mother = wears the pants and the penis. Nice job Chrysler.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I think the ad was funny, personally…

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I think this one is as idiotic as the Superbowl ad but as I mentioned here yesterday, I think most TV advertising is moronic.

    I question the value that Dodge will get from this. Considering that they are on life support, precious revenue going to TV advertising better really cut it and produce $$$ results; I hardly think this one does. Of course with their product line being rather thin it will be tough to garner too much success from advertising in any medium.

    • 0 avatar
      TheFredMan

      I disagree….as do most other commenters.

      I guess we “get it”…even Autoextremist agrees:

      Dodge, Wieden+Kennedy. Publisher’s Note: We praised the work of Wieden+Kennedy – Dodge’s new ad agency – on behalf of the Dodge Charger two weeks ago in “On the Table” (1/27), and during last Sunday’s Super Bowl broadcast, Dodge unveiled the ad agency’s latest TV commercial as part of that same campaign entitled “Man’s Last Stand.” Once again using the droll voiceover stylings of Michael C. Hall of “Dexter” fame, the spot presents a series of men blankly staring at the camera as Hall reels off a litany of things that he will do to keep his woman happy, as long as he gets to drive the car he wants to drive. Savor the perfectly calculated words (below). What can we say? Just an outstanding job of copy writing and a spot-on production execution from Wieden+Kennedy. Superb stuff and one of our favorites from this year’s Super Bowl. – PMD

  • avatar
    westhighgoalie

    Terrible cars, trucks, and S.U.Vs … GREAT AD.

    Simple as that.

  • avatar
    obbop

    “Psychologists have known since Freud that men are insecure about their penises and that women are insecure about not having a penis.”

    Does that explain the power antennaes that used to be placed on fenders and rear quarters?

  • avatar
    BDB

    This is less offensive than “Man’s Last Stand” and sort of works, but I agree Audis’ “Green Police” was still the best ad.

  • avatar

    that ad makes me forget the scorn I have for the charger

  • avatar
    Arminius

    Heart! Are you kidding me, Heart – Crazy On You! How can you not like an add that uses Heart. That is as inspired as using Cheap Trick.

    I vote good ad. As for the actual car – meh.

  • avatar
    Facebook User

    I was really expecting to hate this… but I actually think this is one of the strongest domestic-branded automaker ads in years. Certainly more effective than Howie Long pitching Gov’t Motors Cobalts.

    The ad hits the only strong points the Charger can muster: horsepower, rear drive, a vague sense of escapism and “old-school” attitude. The low camera angle makes the body proportions and horrid C-pillar treatment look less awkward. We don’t see awful panel fits, or the basement-grade interior.

    A rare Chrysler win… but I doubt it lasts.

  • avatar
    Bergwerk

    Does she need a place to stay?

  • avatar
    lutonmoore

    Die Chrysler, die.

  • avatar
    AccAzda

    Alright…

    Seriously this is a bitch complaint..

    Couldn’t ya at least show the car in a different color than SILVER?!

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