TTAC's Ten Worst Awards 2008 – Your Nominations Please

ttacs ten worst awards 2008 8211 your nominations please

With all the industry news we’ve been covering, the Ten Worst Vehicles Awards got pushed to the back burner. But now that the meltdown is underway and seems to be running on autopilot, it’s time to take a look at the jaundiced jalopies that contributed to the fiasco formerly known as the auto industry. For those of you who are new to the site, the Ten Worst Vehicles is TTAC’s homage to excessively egregious examples of vehicular vomitus the automakers puked on the car-buying public during the year. TTACs Best and Brightest (that’s you) make the nominations, our crackhead team of writers narrow the field to 20 or so of the crappiest and then you vote on the top (or bottom) ten. Just to refresh your memories, here are the buckets of bolts you selected as the crème de la crap in 2007:

10. Saturn ION – Thankfully they finally rethinked this one right out of existence

9. Chrysler Aspen – A high-tech hybrid powertrain and massive incentives aren’t enough to revive this turkey.

8. Chevrolet TrailBlazer / GMC Envoy / Isuzu Ascender / Saab 9-7X – All but dead. Good riddance.

7. Hummer H2 – Sells so poorly the entire division is on life support.

6. Hummer H3 – That’s not an exhaust note, it’s a death rattle.

5. Chevrolet Uplander – Dead and finally gone. They even closed the plant.

4. Dodge Nitro – Fizzled like wet fireworks.

3. Chevrolet Aveo – The mouth breather grill won’t help this bottom feeder.

2. Chrysler Sebring – So bad even the rental companies aren’t buying it.

1. Jeep Compass – Jeep enthusiasts asked WTF and buyers agreed.

In case you’ve forgotten since last year, or you’re a Ten Worst virgin, here’s are the rules:

1. Any car or light truck offered for sale as a new vehicle in the U.S. between January 1 and today is eligible for nomination. I know those of you in Canada and other countries feel left out, but we have to draw the line somewhere to keep this under control. It doesn’t matter who built it or where, just that it’s sold legally in the States.

2. All nominations have to be justified. That doesn’t mean just saying it’s a POS car. Tell us WHY it’s a POS car. Nominations may be deleted unceremoniously and without warning for any of the following reasons: insufficient justification, excessive verbosity or pontification, foul language or patent absurdity.

3. All nominations must meet TTAC’s house rules on flaming or trolling (i.e., don’t). Offensive comments about other readers will be summarily deleted and the writer could be banned from TTAC. However, offensive observations about the nominees are encouraged.

4. Blatantly badge-engineered siblings can be nominated jointly if they all suck equally (see winner #8 above). Platform mates can be nominated separately, but may be combined at the whim of the editor for the final vote.

5. If we can wake them up long enough, TTAC’s writers will select 20 finalists from the nominees, give or take a few. The number of times a vehicle is nominated is irrelevant so don’t waste the pixels on typing “me too.”

6. Readers will vote via an electronic survey on the 20 or so finalists to determine America’s Ten Worst Vehicles. Multiple voting ain’t kosher so don’t even try.

7. Nominations begin today and will continue until midnight EDT, Sunday December 8, with the 20 finalists presented for voting a few days afterwards. The winners will be announced whenever we get around to it. We have nothing to give the winners but our disdain, so the winning manufacturers will find out about it like everyone else.

How do you decide what crapmoblies are worthy of your attention?

– Styling so bad it could even make Stevie Wonder look the other way.

– A market misfit that makes you wonder what the product planners were smoking, drinking, shooting up or otherwise self-administering.

– Engineering malpractice that makes the vehicle practically undrivable or so bland you wouldn’t want to drive it.

– Something that you can’t quite put your finger on but gives you the urge to regurge anytime you think about it.

So now it’s in your court. Make your nominations below and tell us which ones you think are really deserving of being named one of TTAC’s Ten Worst Vehicles for 2008.

Please note: Nominations will close at midnight EST Sunday, December 8.

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  • Rev Junkie Rev Junkie on Dec 10, 2008

    Listen M1EK, there is no point in arguing when all you do when someone insults your beloved Prius is call them Rush Limbaugh. Now I've never listened to the man on the radio, I don't even know what the hell station its on! For God's sake, the Prius is the poster child of the "green" movement! You could see it from space! (And while you're up there, please notice the polar ice caps still in existence.) And by the way, I agree with you on the Prius batteries, it does no harm to the ecosystem as they are recyclable.

  • CarnotCycle CarnotCycle on Dec 11, 2008

    When I went on a business trip to Colorado for two weeks I had at my disposal a Toyota Prius rental, so I got a chance to drive the car without being predisposed to owning one. Given how the vehicle's reputation precedes itself (see above) I felt like I was "trespassing" in a way by driving it, given that I am not a card-carrying member of Al Gore's Global Warmingnetics Climatology crew. The verdict on it is mixed. A pretty good around-town car. It handles strangely, because it is a heavy car, but the weight is all below the CG. The thing was useless on the freeway. Once the battery is out and you're on heat-cycle power alone, that thing is the most anemic vehicle I've ever driven. One thing about the Prius experience though that I think indicates hybrids are here to stay is the torque it had. Electric motors have so much torque for their power, and it can be so finely controlled. Those attributes were apparent in the Prius, especially taking off from a stoplight. Strange as it was, you felt like you were accelerating much faster than you were just because it felt so solid in acceleration with all that torque. I could see a very high-performance car constructed as a hybrid with a relatively lightweight high-discharge, low capacity battery and electric motors just for things like launch and traction control. In that context, electric-motivated road cars do have a unique performance quality about them. And if that quality can be felt through something as novacained and underpowered as a Prius, that bodes well for future developments that way. Also, you do get addicted to the MPG meter on the MFD in the dash. Its like a game trying to get your mileage up. And with all that care trying to maximize my mileage driving around Ft. Collins, I never got a better average than 46. Geo Metro does better on gas and out-accelerates the thing. 'Nuff said. Don't buy one. But it was an interesting experience nonetheless.

  • Sgeffe Bronco looks with JLR “reliability!”What’s not to like?!
  • FreedMike Back in the '70s, the one thing keeping consumers from buying more Datsuns was styling - these guys were bringing over some of the ugliest product imaginable. Remember the F10? As hard as I try to blot that rolling aberration from my memory, it comes back. So the name change to Nissan made sense, and happened right as they started bringing over good-looking product (like the Maxima that will be featured in this series). They made a pretty clean break.
  • Flowerplough Liability - Autonomous vehicles must be programmed to make life-ending decisions, and who wants to risk that? Hit the moose or dive into the steep grassy ditch? Ram the sudden pile up that is occurring mere feet in front of the bumper or scan the oncoming lane and swing left? Ram the rogue machine that suddenly swung into my lane, head on, or hop up onto the sidewalk and maybe bump a pedestrian? With no driver involved, Ford/Volkswagen or GM or whomever will bear full responsibility and, in America, be ambulance-chaser sued into bankruptcy and extinction in well under a decade. Or maybe the yuge corporations will get special, good-faith, immunity laws, nation-wide? Yeah, that's the ticket.
  • FreedMike It's not that consumers wouldn't want this tech in theory - I think they would. Honestly, the idea of a car that can take over the truly tedious driving stuff that drives me bonkers - like sitting in traffic - appeals to me. But there's no way I'd put my property and my life in the hands of tech that's clearly not ready for prime time, and neither would the majority of other drivers. If they want this tech to sell, they need to get it right.
  • TitaniumZ Of course they are starting to "sour" on the idea. That's what happens when cars start to drive better than people. Humanpilots mostly suck and make bad decisions.
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