By on January 23, 2008

midboxfront_view.jpgI suspect that a large number of readers are dismayed by America’s love for the full-size pickup truck. It may be an inconvenient truth about cars, but there are still plenty of working people who love the gas-guzzling genre with a passion undimmed by concerns about global warming and America’s [entirely theoretical] energy independence. Drilling down one of Houston’s warehouse districts, the Ford F150 XL MidBox got more thumbs-up than a popular gladiator bleeding on the Coliseum floor. Admit it: other than all that PC stuff, what’s not to like about a workhorse with steel wheels and rubber floors?

Thankfully, mercifully, the F-series’ form follows blue collar function, creating an inherently beautiful vee-hicle. While the F150’s chrome accents and aluminum hoops make it suitable for rodeos or Rodeo Drive, the XL-grade trimmings render it the perfect partner for a new generation of WPA artisans. You know, if things keep heading in that direction…

Amongst the pickupscenti, the F150 XL’s MidBox option is its claim to fame; it's a design so ingenious that one wonders why it took FoMoCo so long to put it into production. Our long wheelbase tester’s integrated toolbox was wedged between a short wheelbase bed and a regular cab. With its OEM handles and locks, door strut-assists, interior lighting and a multitude of storage options; the MidBox keeps a clean shop.

door_seals.jpgConsidering the value of work site tools and the ever-present danger of theft, the $3500 MidBox option works hard to earn its keep. For those who still find a cramped toolbox more appealing, a mid-cycle upgrade ties the MidBox’s locking doors to the key chain’s idiot-proof remote transmitter. How great is that?

Use that fob to get inside the F150 and  you'll discover that the standard cab is actually an extended cab. Open the F-150 XL's rear-hinged doors and there’s room for a change of clothes, work boots, several shotguns, loads of jerky (and beer) and a month’s worth of paperwork. Gaze upstream of the surprisingly comfortable split bench seat and it’s standard fare F150. Aside from the XL’s utilitarian use of flat black and drowsy gray trimmings, the cohesive design and top-notch ergonomics are still the high watermark for the class.

That said, the XL is the anti-luxury truck. You get air conditioning, cruise control and a somewhat respectable AM/FM stereo with a high-tech digital clock. And that’s about it. Of course, nothing else is needed from a work truck; (component) failure is not an option when your livelihood is on the line.

four_drawer.jpgOf course, getting to the workplace is kinda important too. The F-150’s optional 4.6-liter V8 is better than the standard wheezy V6, but it takes 4000 revs to achieve 294 lb-ft of torque. Even with assertive throttle mapping and a relatively flat powerband, the entry-level V8’s mediocre acceleration (zero to sixty takes around ten seconds) ensures Hoon-proof job security and respectable fuel efficiency for the corporate balance sheet. 

While the F-150’s no longer the truck world’s freshest face, its chassis and suspension tuning still help it cut through onramps with authority. Drive smoothly and the F-150 XL feels refined and– dare I say it– taut. Upset the beast’s momentum, and the front end plows harder than a John Deere snow blower. Bottom line: the F-150’s safe enough for government work, and the vented disc brakes (with ABS) take some terror out of a panic stop.

While pickups aren’t known for their ride quality, the MidBox-saddled F-150 XL wafts better than many a luxury car– although this configuration features extra body flex on rough roads. Oh well. With the cruise control engaged and a Zeppelin rock block on the beat box, I couldn’t help but imagine how much cooler my job would be if I fixed actual things rather than cubicle concerns. Cruising in the MidBox makes the dream seem more palatable, more believable. Bob Vila, eat your heart out. 

midboxrear_view.jpgBut all work and no play make the F-150 a dull toy. Load the grille in the bed. Carpet the MidBox in ice cubes and frosty beverages, stock the shelves with ribs and fixins and the XL becomes the largest freezer this side of a refrigerated rail car. And when Miller Time makes way for nap time, pull the floor’s drain plugs and prepare for another week of work. Even better, the F-150 MidBox trumps the Honda Ridgeline’s supposed suburbanite practicality for way less coin. And it’s a real truck that holds 2000lbs with ease, Bubba.

While the F-150’s MidBox configuration isn’t for everyone, I reckon the [current] lack of availability in the Ford Super Duty is its biggest failure. But sometimes creativity separates the men from the boys, and the Magna-sourced MidBox is nothing if not innovative. Eye-openers like this are what the F-150 needs to stay ahead of its ever-stronger competition, and retain its sales crown.

[Joe Myers Ford provided the vehicle reviewed] 

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37 Comments on “Ford F-150 XL MidBox Review...”


  • avatar
    storminvormin

    Do you have any photos of the interior? Was it stark and rubbery? If so, I love it. Any word on whether Ford is going to offer a smaller diesel v8? If so, the diesel version will probably come with loads of extra shit to justify the $7000 price hike.

  • avatar
    N85523

    I think this is sort of a one-trick-pony innovation and I’d be surprised if it catches on. That said, I don’t think it is a bad idea and I bet the quality is great. No doubt it looks terrific. There are two ways that commercial pickups typically utilize space and that seems by either a tool-box or two mounted on the bedrails or an entire tool-box bed replacement. With both methods, there is still a fair amount of open bed-space and with the rail-mounted box, there is still room to push particularly long objects underneath the box. The mid-box makes no provisions for a proper full-length 8-foot pick-up bed. Fleets and small businesses typically look at the bottom line and the mid-box adds a lot of expense in purchase price. Ford did put a much smaller flush-mounted tool-box on trucks in the ’70s but it didn’t catch on but the Nissan Titan seems to have remembered it.

  • avatar
    oboylepr

    I love working trucks! I could never understand why people like to drive pickups that are anything but work trucks. Hauling 2 tons of metal, plastic and rubber around everywhere to transport one person to and from work makes no sense to me. But then, I didn’t grow up in a truck lovin’ country. But when i see one of these F150’s with 4 big honkin’ construction workers wearing hard hats, covered in mud, Dash top covered in paper and sundry nuts and bolts, cargo box full of tools and construction materials and towing a big air compressor I think, Ah a thing of beauty!

  • avatar
    AKM

    It may be an inconvenient truth about cars, but there are still plenty of working people who love the gas-guzzling genre with a passion undimmed by concerns about global warming and America’s [entirely theoretical] energy independence.

    During its coverage of the Detroit show, Automotive News ran a piece explaining that the pick-up segment that experimented explosive growth was the option-laden, luxury-oriented truck (F-150 Harley Davidson, new Ram Platinum…). Given that those go for over $40,000, I doubt they’re directed at working men.

    Let’s be honest: a pick-up used as a workhorse is fine. It’s the “I have an office job but want to look tough and pretend I use it to tow stuff every 4 years” mentality that is ridiculous.

    I love seeing pick-ups covered in mud and full of tools and junk in the bed. Those are used for what they are designed for. The clean, shiny, F-350 that I see on the highway going to the office inspire only disdain for their drivers.

  • avatar
    86er

    I love seeing pick-ups covered in mud and full of tools and junk in the bed. Those are used for what they are designed for. The clean, shiny, F-350 that I see on the highway going to the office inspire only disdain for their drivers.

    One must be careful with this logic, because it can applied to a host of vehicle segments. The same could be said of the 911 Turbo driver who is commuting to work with it instead of taking it to the track, etc. etc.

    Despite our attempts to apply our values to others, that pesky little thing called free choice gets in the way.

  • avatar
    N85523

    Yep, I wouldn’t want to drive a pick-up every day, but I once did becaue that is all I had. I don’t like the idea that folks bring attention to their hybrids (vanity plates, extra decals, etc.) or use 4×4’s exclusively in the urban jungle, but everybody has a right to drive the vehicle they choose and can afford.

  • avatar
    crackers

    $3500 for a built-in tool box? No thanks!

  • avatar
    brianmack

    This could be perfect for rural fire departments as their light-duty go-anywhere utility truck. It is still PC to be able to put out fires, right?

  • avatar
    brianmack

    blalor: Best engrish site of the day. I had to open both sites side-by-side to translate it, but you are absolutely right.

  • avatar

    The one nice thing about my F-150 midbox is that it can hold a 4′ by 8′ sheet of plywood flat in the back bed with the tailgate down. That’s important if you’re doing any sort of construction: if a pickup cannot hold a piece of 4′ by 8′ plywood flat in the back bed, it’s essentially useless for hauling stuff to a job site.

  • avatar
    AKM

    One must be careful with this logic, because it can applied to a host of vehicle segments. The same could be said of the 911 Turbo driver who is commuting to work with it instead of taking it to the track, etc. etc.

    Despite our attempts to apply our values to others, that pesky little thing called free choice gets in the way.

    Actually, I do think the same of 911s that are used only to parade and not to race.
    And my disdain does not extend to banning those vehicles, but is an expression of my own freedom of speech ;-)

    I respect people who drive a vehicle adapted to their needs. I also (albeit grudgingly) respect people who drive a vehicle based on their desires and acknowledge this “I drive a pick-up because I like feeling bigger and higher than anybody else on the road” or “I drive a 911 because I’m going through my mid-life crisis and want to enjoy the feeling of a powerful engine even though I don’t get to really use it”.
    However, I don’t respect people who try to rationalize driving a vehicle they bought based on desires, such as “I drive a pick-up because it’s safer” or “I drive a 911 because I need to travel fast”.

    I’ve long been advocating against CAFE increases (that will limit the choice for car buyers), and for a gas tax instead, in which case people could drive what they want, but would have to pay for their choices.

  • avatar
    86er

    However, I don’t respect people who try to rationalize driving a vehicle they bought based on desires, such as “I drive a pick-up because it’s safer” or “I drive a 911 because I need to travel fast”.

    I agree. I’ve never felt the need to justify my purchases, and anyone that tries to make me think otherwise gets an earful.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Is that midbox option on both sides of the bed?

  • avatar
    P.J. McCombs

    However, I don’t respect people who try to rationalize driving a vehicle they bought based on desires, such as “I drive a pick-up because it’s safer” or “I drive a 911 because I need to travel fast”.

    Thirded. But at least I can see over a 911, and I’ve never been rear-ended by a 911 that couldn’t stop quickly in the rain.

    Quasimondo, I believe the Midbox does tunnel all the way through, with two doors.

  • avatar
    blautens

    Our local sheriff’s office training bureau is ordering these to replace their aging minivans. Enough decent lockable storage mixed with the ability to carry cones, targets, supplies, hose out the back, and still tow trailers easily – they loved their test one.

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    I too would like to see the interior. A member at a classic truck site that I also frequent has “If you can’t hose it out, it’s not a real truck” in his signature line. I think that sums it up pretty well.

    I am mighty disappointed in the torque rating for the V8 engine. I believe the inline 6 in my ’58 Chevy has over 200 lb-ft of torque at much lower rpm as well.

  • avatar
    Dynamic88

    I had not heard of this midbox thing before. Seems like a good idea, thought kinda pricey. (How much do door hinges cost?)

    I’m confused about the length of the bed. Also I’m not sure it’s much of an advantage over an extended cab, which also gives you lockable storage.

    Anyway, it’s new, and innovative.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I sometimes wonder what is driving the designs of American trucks. They are now so big and tall that’s nearly impossible for a non-NBA player to pick items out of the bed without the assistance of a step ladder. No wonder both Ford and Dodge now offer storage that is actually reachable by persons less than 7″ tall. Why not just make the truck bed lower so its easer to load and unload?

    I work with a bunch of building contractors and non of them has one of these monster trucks. Most have older trucks like the S10 and Tacoma or commercial vans. Sometimes it seems that these new 380hp monster trucks are mainly designed for guys trying to promote a more masculine image rather than real work.

  • avatar
    Brendon from Canada

    I agree. I’ve never felt the need to justify my purchases, and anyone that tries to make me think otherwise gets an earful.

    Hope that’s sarcasm I hear! ;)

  • avatar

    carguy:

    The redesigned 2009 Ford F-150 has steps that fold out from each side of the bed, and another in the tailgate. Ford explicitly says they felt this was a better solution than reducing the height and thus cargo capacity of the bed.

    I also thought the midbox was new with the 2009s. Apparently not.

    TrueDelta will have reliability info on the 2004 and 2005 F-150 in May. More participants always helpful.

    http://www.truedelta.com/reliability.php

  • avatar
    KixStart

    While I’m favorably impressed by Ford coming up with a new slant on pickup truck styles, I’m a little surprised that I can’t recall seeing this feature on any TV ad.

    So, where’s the ad budget support? Or did I successfully tune out all those truck commercials aired during Patriots’ games?

    And $3500 seems high to me, too. Realistically, who’d pay that instead of just buying a cargo box insert? Or a cargo box cap? Or a real extended cab?

  • avatar
    BEAT

    This is my father’s truck but a little bigger and pimp out. He loves truck and American cars.

    I asked him why he’s still drives his truck while the gas price is rising? he said…

    “Because I’m a contractor and American who likes big stuff, Why should I buy a tinie winnie Jap cars if I can drive a bigger and tougher vehicle like my truck”.

    He actually drive my Lancer once in awhile. Men!!!

  • avatar
    Pahaska

    I love working trucks! I could never understand why people like to drive pickups that are anything but work trucks.
    Because, other than an occasional trip to Lowes or HD, just about all of the miles on my pickup are with the 29′ Airstream hooked on behind or locally in areas we are visiting.

    I (we) spend lots of hours on the road and I want (and have) as nice appointments in my Silverado Duramax LTZ as I have in my Azera. Actually, a bit better in the truck with backup sensors, folding mirrors, XM radio, heated washer fluid, etc.

  • avatar
    davey49

    There’s also a Midbox for the GM Colorado/Canyon trucks. Check midbox.com for more info.

    There’s also another company that makes a small fiberglass cube van style body for the Colorado.
    Search for supreme corp Astro Body

  • avatar

    It is still PC to be able to put out fires, right?

    At least until Fahrenheit 451 kicks in……

    John

  • avatar
    RayH

    I agree with Kix… for $3500, could by a utility box bed (as long as you didn’t opt for a stainless diamondcoated one), and then sell the bed (which are always in demand, even on newer trucks). Or a very high quality, locking, secure topper for $1500 last time I checked. Would happily buy ANY full-sized base worktruck gas truck that got mid 20’s on the highway, or even 20 overall.

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    86er:
    One must be careful with this logic, because it can applied to a host of vehicle segments. The same could be said of the 911 Turbo driver who is commuting to work with it instead of taking it to the track, etc. etc.

    Despite our attempts to apply our values to others, that pesky little thing called free choice gets in the way.

    Others have approved of your ‘free choice’ point – and I agree also.

    However, I’d be open to states adding / regulating the use of powerful & heavy vehicles via driver’s license restrictions & endorsements. There currently ARE limits on vehicle size – upscale soccer mom’s Freightliner platformed KingKong-Escalade does NOT currently exist.

  • avatar

    Thanks for reading, everyone. RF picked a great time to publish it: my cubicle job has me running in circles. The MidBox lifestyle I wrote about sounds mighty nice right now.

    ————————————
    storminvormin : Was it stark and rubbery? If so, I love it.

    Its just like every XL trim Ford truck from the past 25+ years: you’ll love it.
    ————————————

    N85523 : I think this is sort of a one-trick-pony innovation and I’d be surprised if it catches on. That said, I don’t think it is a bad idea and I bet the quality is great. No doubt it looks terrific.

    It is terrific, but the appeal is obviously limited to people who need a nice, safe place to lock tools and whatnot. Pool cleaning companies, certain government industries…many different businesses can use it. Most TTAC readers have no need for the MidBox, but its value is there and adds to the already impressive portfolio of configurations for the F150.
    ————————————

    W3woody: The one nice thing about my F-150 midbox is that it can hold a 4′ by 8′ sheet of plywood flat in the back bed with the tailgate down.

    Nice to hear, I kinda wondered if that would fit back there. So why did you pick a MidBox anyway? Inquiring minds wanna know!
    ————————————

    86er : I agree. I’ve never felt the need to justify my purchases, and anyone that tries to make me think otherwise gets an earful.

    Especially if they judge you by the one time they see you on the road. But its fun to silently judge people on their choice of vehicle, as long as one keeps it to oneself.
    ————————————

    quasimondo : Is that midbox option on both sides of the bed?

    Two doors for both sides of the bed. You can have it empty, shelved on one side, or shelved on both. And you have two depths of drawers to choose from.
    ————————————

    blautens : Our local sheriff’s office training bureau is ordering these to replace their aging minivans. Enough decent lockable storage mixed with the ability to carry cones, targets, supplies, hose out the back, and still tow trailers easily – they loved their test one.

    Bingo!!! That’s why I stood back, took stock, and quickly judged it worthy of five stars. I don’t need it, but I sure as hell get it.
    ————————————

    Dynamic88 : I’m not sure it’s much of an advantage over an extended cab, which also gives you lockable storage.

    Think about it this way: the stuff carried in the MidBox won’t get lodged in the driver’s brain after an accident. If you have company tools, company truck, etc this is a safe way to ensure accountability (from theft) and safety (for the employee and from lawyers)

    When you think about possible lawsuits and theft, $3500 isn’t that steep at all.

    Oh, from what I gather, the $3500 cost comes from this not being a factory installed option. The factory spits out a long wheelbase/short bed F150 and a third party (dealer?) installs the Midbox. And yes, it only comes in white.

    ————————————

    carguy : No wonder both Ford and Dodge now offer storage that is actually reachable by persons less than 7″ tall. Why not just make the truck bed lower so its easer to load and unload?

    No argument here: I’ll touch on that in a future review.

    carguy : Sometimes it seems that these new 380hp monster trucks are mainly designed for guys trying to promote a more masculine image rather than real work.

    Luckily most fleet guys don’t go nuts with the horsepower. I’m not a big fan of the Ford 4.6L in trucks, but it really didn’t disappoint me.
    ————————————

    Michael Karesh : I also thought the midbox was new with the 2009s. Apparently not.

    Same here. When I saw it, I had to test it. This was supposed to be a 2009 addition, but they slipped it in early. But maybe the Tundra had something to do with it.
    ————————————

    KixStart : I’m a little surprised that I can’t recall seeing this feature on any TV ad.

    It’s really not for the retail market, but I expect it will be widely available come mid-year 2009. The Super Duty will do well with it. (if it shows up there)

    ————————————

    Pahaska : I (we) spend lots of hours on the road and I want (and have) as nice appointments in my Silverado Duramax LTZ as I have in my Azera.

    Funny you mention it, I want all that stuff with a work truck-spec rubber floor. That floor defines a truck…and its what makes a truck better than a car.

    Course I also think Minivans should have rubber floors under the rear benches. :)
    ————————————

    davey49 : There’s also a Midbox for the GM Colorado/Canyon trucks. Check midbox.com for more info.

    I was looking for more info on that Colorado MidBox. Its an option for their 2WT trim level, but I can’t build one to see how much cheaper it will be over an F150 MidBox. Google tells me it might be $5000 cheaper (great) but some look like $3000 or less. So I wonder if the Colorado MidBox is a lousy value over the F150.

  • avatar
    LamborghiniZ

    Lets not compare this to the Ridgeline. Saying this is more practical than the Ridgeline is truly unfair. The Ridgeline drives like a car, has lots of room for 5, count them 5, passengers, has a similar lockable trunk under the pickup bed, looks better, and has nicer interior accommodation. There’s no way to compare the two because this is a work truck while the Honda is a truck for the real world. And at the end of the day, unless you work for plumbing or construction or some other trade, the Honda makes WAY, WAY more sense, and is a far better vehicle with more overall innovations.

    I will however say I’d rather have this for the above mentioned trades. But not for real world ownership.

  • avatar
    IronEagle

    crackers has it right IMO. The box is very innovative but Ford should have had that standard for years now. Like say for the worktruck it is a tool box, for the King Ranch it is a beer cooler etc. I believe it was around 1990 that Nissan had that concept small pickup that looked like a melted ice cream cone with the side box like this. Where has the innovation been the last decade? Perhaps instead of making this generation F-150 such a fat porker and as strong as a railroad truss they should have put the money towards a great innovation like this IMO.

    For instance with an extra $3500 at my Dodge dealer in ’06 you were able to upgrade the standard quadcab 1500 Ram to the MegaCab 1500 Ram that is really a HD 2500 with softer springs. They threw in the Heavy Duty fully hydroformed frame, 11.5 inch Dana rear, 14 inch 4 wheel discs with standard ABS and auto f/r bias control, *($900 option IIRC on regular 1500), and all that MegaCab room with reclining rear seat my girlfriends love. ;)

    Plus you got the best Hemi that year that didn’t use the transparent 4 cylinder shut off. I could only imagine that getting stuck in 4 cylinder mode while towing the 20 foot car carrier and the racecar.

    My point is that it seems that is too much money for the side doors on the bed and shelves. Hell buy me dinner at the Golden Corral and i’ll make you a Midbox. I’ll bring my Dremel.

    Speaking of Dodge their new Ram beer cooler bed is very nice also.

  • avatar

    LamborghiniZ: There’s no way to compare the two because this is a work truck while the Honda is a truck for the real world.

    And I’d counter that there’s no such thing as a “truck for the real world.”

    Not that I’m hatin’ on the Ridgeline, I just don’t care for its “truck” marketing designation, its insane asking price, lack of towing, and all around car like attributes…much like the El Caminos of yesteryear.

    IronEagle: I saw the Ram Box at the NAIAS, it should be a better option for retail buyers. But for the world of fleets buyers and entrepreneurs, the MidBox is way more practical. (and I think it looks better)

  • avatar
    Shannon

    Comparing a Ridgeline to the F150 Sajeev reviewed is ridiculous. The F150 has almost twice the payload (2100 vs 1100), a ton more tow capacity (7200 vs 5000), almost 50 lb-ft more torque (294 vs 245), and almost 8 inches more hiproom (65.4 vs 57.6). In exchange for lesser capacity, the Ridgeline gets ONE mpg better fuel economy (15/20 vs 14/19). The F150 is several thousand less. The F150, and other F-series, offer hundreds of combinations that may suit a particular need, where the Ridgeline offers one.

    The Ridgeline is a neat vehicle, but not a truck. Ever seen one towing? The rear wheels take a huge negative camber and the rear end squats under the load. The 8.5 cu ft under-bed storage is a great idea, but inaccessible when the bed is being used!?

    To say that the Honda makes more sense is senseless, my opinion, because it does nothing particularly well, AND gets full-size truck fuel economy. Honda sold fewer Ridgelines last year than ANY full size truck, of any brand. Ford sold several hundred thousand more F-series trucks than Honda sold Ridgelines.

    If someone wants a truck only for their suburban requirements (Home Depot and dumping grass clippings) maybe they should buy a fifteen year old full-size truck for a couple grand and buy a nice 30+ mpg mid-size sedan for the daily grind.

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    AKM,

    Not to pick on you, but I want to point out another problem with your post.

    Working people DO MAKE ENOUGH to buy 40k trucks. No, not when they are just starting out, but later in their careers as tradesmen, farmers, ranchers, or skilled laborers lot’s of folks move up the ladder. Those people often still want trucks.

    I know and have met folks that started without college, worked hard, stayed out of trouble, and applied a little ambition. Many of them millionaires.

    Don’t fall into the trap that workers never get anywhere, it’s a HUGE lie.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    That is true Landcrusher my father never graduated from High School but he earn a good descent living in construction and a contractor he even went to New York to help the 9/11 victims and put his kid thru College. (that’s me)

    Those are the hard working Americans who deserve respect and there are millions of them out there.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    I love the F-150… particularly in XL trim with the rubber floors and steel wheels. But I cannot ignore the the price of fuel and the F-150’s gas mileage just too low for me.

    That’s why I’m still hanging onto the my Ranger. Yes, I have a desk job during the week but the Ranger is a pretty good commuter and I really do use its truck abilities every weekend.

    Now if the F-150 offered a diesel for not too much more money…

    Or does anyone have any real skinny on the next Ranger – or Ranger replacement? I had heard rumors about a slightly larger truck to fill that spot in Ford’s lineup – possibly called the F-100.

  • avatar
    IronEagle

    Rangers are good trucks i’d love to have a 4×4 version to take in the woods. I don’t know why Ford has not done a rehaul yet.

  • avatar

    Steve Biro: Ranger will be dead. That could change, but its factory is slated to close come 2009.

    And since you mentioned it, a Ranger XL review is in the pipeline.


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