By on June 28, 2006

vette.jpgPSST… Hey you!  Yeah, you over there with the shiny new Corvette…  I have something to tell you…  C’mon over…  Now stand close so I can whisper something in your ear.  No, really… it’s a good thing.    Be sure to listen carefully.  I don’t want you to miss this.  It’s something you really need to hear about your baby.  Ready?  OK, here it is… HEY BONEHEAD!  THAT CORVETTE IS A CAR!!  TAKE IT OUT AND DRIVE THE HELL OUT OF IT!

For those Corvette owners who don't understand the concept, I need to explain.  First of all, I’m not recommending that guardians of 53’s, ’57 fuelies, ’63 Z06’s and the other 'Vettes critical to the marque's heritage should go out and thrash their historical artifacts to an inch of their lives (although I'm not against the idea).  Obviously, these vehicles need to be protected and preserved for future generations.  I’m talking about the non-treatment meted-out to your everday, garden-variety trailer queens and wannabees.  You know, the pampered bow tie bombers you see at every club meeting, cruise night and Corvette gathering. 

These seem to fall into two categories.  The first are 'Vettes with paint jobs that cost more than your average Hyundai, chromed to a fare-thee-well and displayed behind ropes like a priceless object d’arte. These are nothing more than full-scale Hot Wheel toys– and just about as useful.  The others are pimped-out stockers that bear silent testimony to what happens when an overabundance of cash intersects with a dearth of taste at the locus of an aftermarket parts catalogue. 

In both cases, you can tell the cars hardly ever leave the garage except when the owners show them off like some priceless Faberge egg.  It’s fun to watch, though.  The owner hovers nearby with polishing cloth and duster at the standby, watching warily in case someone dares touch his precious baby or a speck of dust should fall on it.  Some day I’m going to sneeze on one just to watch the owner pop a blood vessel in his neck.

Many Corvette owners who don’t participate in these spectacles exhibit equally strange behavior.  I have no problem with someone keeping their car looking good, but these people have gone beyond obsessive and now live in the realm of the irrational.  They won’t drive their car in the rain.  They spend exorbitant amounts on special waxes and beauty creams.  They wash it only in distilled rainwater and dry it with chamois from organically-raised sheep that were given daily massages to keep their skin supple.  They panic at the prospect of getting a stone chip in their extra-cost base-coat/clear-coat paint or a scuff on the (cheap) leather upholstery.  

Before you start screaming sour grapes because, obviously, I’m jealous of Corvette owners and if I had one I’d understand, know this:  I own a Corvette.  I wanted one ever since I went down to the Chevy dealer with my grandfather and sat in the ‘Vette while he did his business.  When I got to the point where my credit rating could handle the hit, I bought one.  And I drive it regularly, even in the rain.  I take long trips in it.  I carry my dog it.  I may wash it once a month– in a drive-through car wash. 

Some owners would say I don’t deserve a Corvette.  I say Corvettes were meant to be driven, not pimped, primped, and posed.  Laying aside whatever you think about Chevrolet or GM for a moment, you have to admit the Corvette is a great performance car.  It offers a combination of acceleration, handling, braking and fuel economy you won’t find in many other cars.  I don’t understand anyone who buys one then keeps it locked away in the garage, driving it maybe 100 miles a month.  What in the name of Zora Arkus-Dutov do they think Corvettes are for?

I’ll tell you what they’re for.  They’re for dancing down a winding road to the music of a small block V-8.  They’re for winding through the gears flat-out when the road turns straight.   They’re for transforming high octane petroleum distillates into the most fun you can have with your clothes on.  They’re the perfect antidote for ennui, a quicker waker-upper than a cup of Starbucks’ best.  They’re for entertaining the senses, for restoring your joy of driving, for having a balls-out, catch-me-if-you-can, power sliding good time.

The same criticisms can be leveled at owners of any number of cars.  What of the poseurs driving Jeep Wranglers whose tires have never touched the bare earth?  Many drivers wear their car like so much jewelry, trying make a “life style statement.”  They want everyone to admire their cars so they can sneer “I have one and you don’t.”  People like that should never be allowed to own a proper sports car.  They’re incapable of understanding their car’s soul.  They’re too wrapped up in themselves to notice it even has one.

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38 Comments on “Sports Cars: Posers Need Not Apply...”


  • avatar

    Frank:

    The other day I was stuck in a drive-thru behind an MR2 Spyder with this sticker on the back:

    WARNING
    IF YOU CAN READ THIS YOU’RE TOO CLOSE
    I STILL ROLL BACKWARDS
    OOPS!

    Yep . . . somebody who can barely drive a stick bought an MR2 Spyder.

  • avatar
    Frank Williams

    Well, at least they got the stick. To me an automatic in a sports car is an abomination. (Yeah, yeah, I know what Farago said about how the DSG spells doom for the three pedal car. I’m one of those who still needs something for my left foot to do.)

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    That was really entertaining, Frank. You brought back “fond” memories of my last Corvette gathering at the Bowling Green Museum. Let’s not forget the tacky stuff Mid-America and Eckler’s sell to the Corvette trailer queen crowd. The worst are the blinged-out bench racers, talking about how great Corvettes perform while workin’ the California car duster. Sweeet.

    Then again, its their money and I have two functional legs. And its the same story with any other high performance machine.

  • avatar
    guyincognito

    As someone of not quite substantial enough finances to purchase a new vehicle in the Vette class, I wholeheartedly disagree with this article. I say, keep that car in a climate controlled environment at all times until it depreciates enough for me to afford it. I’ll take care of the driving the hell out of it business thereafter.

  • avatar
    chandler

    @Mark: this morning I passed a middle-age housewife in her RX-8 who was driving it like, well, an old lady. Which is to say that it probably wasn’t getting above 4000 RPM the way she was driving it. I wonder why she bought the car?

  • avatar
    polykarb

    The first car i’ve ever put a wrech to was a C4 1996 Corvette, 543 crank hp, naturally aspirated LT-1.

    My step-father and I built it up in the time of 2 months in our spare time, that thing owned the streets. When I was 16 it was finished, and took it out. He told me to drive it out to the main road in our community, barely gave it gas and the rear end snapped out and did a 360 in the middle of the road. 11.012 quarter mile time. Kevlar reinforced gears, ferrari fuel pump, edelbrock twin tb, custom exhaust, detroit locker rear end, block overbored 3mm and sleeved, too much stuff to list.

    Without that ‘Vette and the guidance of my step-father, I would know nothing about cars.

  • avatar
    Konl

    It’s not what you’ve got, it’s how you use it. I got a graphic illustration of this on the way to work the other morning.

    I got on the highway as usual and pulled over to the left hand lane to make some time. But clogging the lane ahead of me was a Mercedes doing 115 (about 70 mph, for the Yanks in the crowd). Not just any Mercedes, either: an AMG roadster! And I thought, “You fool! You paid extra for the go-fast version–why aren’t you a speck on the horizon?”

    But never mind. He pulled over and I got up to my preferred cruising speed, around 135 (about 80 mph). And I’m tooling along nicely when a car approaches in the rear-view mirror. Like a good citizen, I pulled into the middle lane so the car could pass me. What was blowing my doors off? A VW Jetta station wagon. A DIESEL station wagon, full of junk.

    If I’d been a cop, I would have pulled over both cars and made the drivers change places. Honestly, there is no justice.

  • avatar
    BarryO

    Konl,

    That was hysterical. ‘Make the drivers change places’ – that’s great. I especially dig the fact that you were a good enough citizen to get out of the passing lane out of respect for someone else’s need to shave a few seconds off the world’s fastest commute record.

    In the end, I believe there is justice, though. Next life, that Jetta driver may come back as a ’64 Midget.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I understand why so many ‘Vette owners drive their cars like their in a parade while on the freeway: instant cop bait. For the other folks, in a way I kind of envy them, it must be nice to devote that amount of time and resources to something inanimate, like a car. Which, if I had different circumstances, I *might* participate in.

    I had a discussion with a neighbor of mine a couple of years ago. He’s the (adult) son of a local car dealer. His passion then was taking a perfectly ordinary Kia something-or-another and giving it the full ‘fast & furious’ look. Just the look, not the horsepower. The odd thing about this, we’re the same age, in our mid-40’s. I, on the other hand, was showing my teenage daughter how to install platinum spark plugs in my beater Cavalier Z24.

    I couldn’t hold my tongue and asked him why he was tricking out a Kia, and he said that he liked his cars to ‘look’ fast. When I explained that I didn’t care what it looks like, I just want it to run (and well).

    I don’t think that either one of us truly understands the other’s position, but it did show me a whole new side of my neighbor that was heretofore undiscovered.

    I’m definitely in the same camp with you, just drive the damned thing. Enjoy it while you can. Nothing is permanent on this earth.

  • avatar
    Hutton

    You struck a nerve here… Whenever I see a Corvette on the highway, it’s in the right lane, doing 50mph. It’s so maddening. You bought a fast car… to drive slow in? That’s almost as dumb as buying an off-road vehical to commute in. Not that anyone would do that. (oh wait…). As a car fan, it’s always exciting to see a cool car out on the road, (granted, Corvettes may be on the low end of the supercar spectrum, but still…. it’s a Corvette!) but the excitement wears off quickly when I pass right by them at 65. I’m not saying people should drive fast because others expect them too… that would be stupid. But I expect people who buy enthusiasts’ cars to drive them enthusiastically! If you bought you’re ‘Vette to admire in the driveway, you bought the wrong car… cause they ain’t pretty.

    • 0 avatar
      kokomokid

      When I’m driving on the interstate, I drive as fast as I figure I can get by with, and not get speeding tickets. I do that, whether driving my Corvette, or my Prius. The thing I find is that, even though I drive both cars the same way on the superslab, people hogging the passing lane in their SUV’s are more likely to move over for the Corvette. I know people who hate both Corvettes and Priuses, but they apparently act differently in the presence of different cars.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    Don’t hate on those guys going 50 too much. They just might be one ticket away from losing their license. Remember, when you have a hot ride, you get pulled over just for looking fast… and to whomever is tricking out their kia… There is nothing more laughable than a kia or hyundai with a body kit. I hate people who mess up their cars more than those who treat ’em like babies. Like this guy on my block with a black 944… last month he went and put yellow sticker stripes all over the thing. It looks so so bad. It makes my eyes bleed.

  • avatar
    ktm

    To those of you who are saying that the Corvette is a cop magnet, you would be wrong. Check out the insurance on a Corvette (for you over-25’ers that is). The insurance rating for Corvettes is quite low compared to other cars such as the 350z, Subaru STi, Mitsu Evo, etc. Why you ask? Owner demographics.

    How many teenagers, 20 and 30 somethings own Corvettes (not for a lack of funds)? Right. What is the average age of a Corvette owner? Right.

    Cops know this and insurance companies know this. They know that the drivers are low risk.

    What gets me is not the Corvette owners driving so slow (because I have come to accept the fact that they are probably driving the same speed as their age), but the Porsche, Ferrari, M-B AMG, BMW M-series owners driving slow.

  • avatar
    Bryan Myrkle

    When I was a kid in the mid-1980s, an older cousin of mine had a sweet ’69 Vette that seemed like my every automotive fantasy come to life.

    I dreamed of the day that he’d offer me a ride. And when that perfect summer afternoon finally arrived, I was breathless. I was sure I wouldn’t be able to sit up against the g-forces pushing me down, nor hear anything except the rushing wind and the side pipes screaming in my ear. It was going to be like nothing I’d ever experienced before.

    I bet we hit close to 45 m.p.h. that day. And I think we covered more than a half mile before he turned around in a (paved) driveway to head back. Man, I’ll never forget it.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    ktm – are you joking? you mean cops don’t pay more attention to red sports cars speeding in the left lane? wow everybody has it all wrong!

  • avatar
    Frank Williams

    Re: Corvettes as cop magnets

    I drove a bright yellow Corvette in Texas for almost 3 years with a license plate that read “TKIT B8” (“ticket bait,” for the phonetically challenged). I was never stopped by any law enforcement official for any reason, even though I customarily drove well over the posted limit.

    Frank

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Just in case it isn’t clear: keep the aggressive driving at the drag strip and the roadcourses/autocrosses. The real driving happens there, try that on the street and you’ll wind up in jail, the hospital, or the morgue.

    Corvettes are made to cruise and thrash, but some people forget about the “thrash” part. And that’s a shame.

  • avatar
    Hutton

    Sajeev,
    Good point, though I think you can differentiate between pushing your car and enjoying the performance aspects of it (Which I assume most everyone here would advocate) and driving recklessley and endangering others (Which I’m hoping no one would advocate).

  • avatar
    ktm

    dolo54, I suggest you re-read the article and some of the responses. No where does anyone discuss a Corvette speeding in the left lane. The article, and a majority of responses, address Corvettes driving either at or below the posted speed limit. One commentor suggested that the driver does not want to attract the unwanted attention of a cop.

    I am saying that cops do not target Corvette (and only Corvette) owners because they know that the owner is most likely over 50, and as such will probably be walking his car. Now, if you are talking about a red Toyota Celica, or a WRB Subaru WRX, any 350z (basically, any car within the purchasing reach of a teenager – or their parents – or 20-something), then I agree.

  • avatar
    mbslk350

    As the receipient of a ticket for doing 19-over in my SLK, in the middle of nowhere on a sunny day with no traffic, I now stay below 60 on the highway. It stinks. This car can do 80 and barely break a sweat. Staying at 55 is an insult. But I need to keep my license…

    (By the way, I think the cop did me a favor by charging me with 74 in a 55. I was doing at least 80, probably more.)

  • avatar
    dolo54

    reread my original post and you will see that the only point that i had was that if someone is in a sports car and they are driving the speed limit or a bit under… it may be due to the fact that they are trying to keep their license, and not because they don’t appreciate their car or don’t like to go fast. i have no data nor do i care to argue about which sports car gets more attention from police. i’m pretty sure all sports cars get more attention than a taurus or hyundai…

  • avatar
    Hutton

    Trust me, I’m all too aware of what it’s like to pilot a cop-magnet status vehicle as the owner of the most childishly obnoxious looking vehical to grace asphalt in recent memory (STi). I swear if I drive by a cop doing 70, and a Corvette drives by at 90, I’ll be the one to get pulled over. That’s the price of owning that type of car, so it’s not a complaint, just pointing out that I think the days of the typical shiny red sports cars being cop-bait are over. As far as I can tell, KTM’s got it right about what the cop’s are looking for.

  • avatar
    Joe C.

    Oh…my…Gawd – you have nailed my brother in law, “Bob” – though, pseudonym probably not required, as the kind of Vette owner you describe wouldn’t read TTAC. He’s very proud of his dust-free 24,000-mile ’94 C4, bought it from another Goober who only put 300 miles on it in 3 years, and paid $5k over KBB for the privilege. (I won’t be sending him your article so I don’t start WW3 in the famiglia.) His daily driver: Malibu company car (so, who can blame him, I guess). Mine: ’99 Miata, which gets heavy weekend use, too (it wants to be a Boxster when it grows up). He polished my car’s rock-pocked nose with some special mail-order crap this weekend – yeah, nice, thanks Bob. If you can’t enjoy it, why own it?

  • avatar
    Stephan Wilkinson

    Sajeev has it right. Save it for the track. When the kid in the Corvette pulls alognside my old Porsche (see “Old School Porker”) and wants to race, I think to myself, “Have a nice day, Too Fast Too Stupid, I’m goin’ to the track next week.” I save my drive-like-hell stuff for Lime Rock, Watkins Glen and Pocono, because I’m simply not good enough to recover an out-of-control situation on a public highway.

    There’s a 500-hp supercharged GT500 Mustang press car in the driveway right now, and it handles even worse than my 911. No way I’m going to drive that thing hard anywhere I put anybody else at risk.

    How hard is it to get onto a racetrack? As hard as sending your $40 (or so) membership fee to the car club of your choice–Corvair, PCA, Ferrari, Subaru, Mazda, Goggomobile…

    Stephan Wilkinson
    Too Slow Too Old

  • avatar
    Frank Williams

    Disclaimer:

    My article was in no way a recommendation for or endorsement of driving recklessly on public roads, or in any other way endangering your own or anyone else’s lives. As others have stated, save the fancy stuff for the track. I was merely trying to point out (ok, ridicule) those people (like “Bob,” mentioned above) who own Corvettes (and other sports cars) but never take them out of the garage and enjoy driving a car that was meant to be driven. That is all.

    Frank

  • avatar
    chaz_233

    I concur. I would take it one step further. How about all those folks who do drive their Vettes, Vipers, Lambos, Ferraris…I know you’ve seen them…in the right lane…at 30 mph…at all times…who won’t let the speedometer go past 35–regardless of the posted speed limit I might add. That just kills me. It’s got to be one of the great injustices of Capitalism that when you’re young, reckless, and thrill-seeking, you can’t afford to indulge in the pleasures of driving such a machine. Meanwhile, the hypohormonals who can afford them, by whatever questionable business dealings they engage in for a living, refuse to use these cars for the very purpose for which they were built.

  • avatar
    camp6ell

    what’s with all this pc bs safety/disclaimer stuff? and from the commenters no less! i thought this was the internet?!

  • avatar
    noescape

    gee isn’t that wierd…thats just how I pamper my suby Sti all week but I cant seem to hide those paintchips on the front end caused by the weekend rallys…. nor can I figure out why that vette couldnt lose me flying across the bayside bridge here,, what purpose do those cars have really??

  • avatar
    Chadillac

    Stephen Wilkinson,
    Could you post a little info on what you need to join a track club for a little weekend fun? I don’t have anything glamoros-just a late model Toyota Supra (Manual-I can’t stand auto’s). But, as a high schooler (its my 1st car) I’d like to be able to have a little fun in it, but I’m not going to risk killing anyone (myself included) or getting my license taken away by trying to see what I can do on the freeway-unlike some of my stupid friends who think the 40mph zones are perfect for seeing 130mph go by…. and I know for a fact they can’t handle their cars well enough to do that, and I’m most likely a much better driver than them. But I digress.
    I’d like to find something that can get me into Laguna Seca or Infineon (Sears Point) in CA. Any ideas? Thanks.

  • avatar

    maybe they’re all (the slow drivers) just trying to get the best gas mileage possible.

  • avatar
    Stephan Wilkinson

    Chadillac: a few marque clubs are very exclusionary. The Porsche Club of America, Ferrari Club and a few others only allow Porsches and Ferraris to participat in their track days. Others, like the Audi Club and BMWCCA allow lots of different makes to participate in what are generally called “driver education” days. (Sounds nerdy, but it isn’t.) The SCCA’s various regions also hold open-to-anybody open-track days at places like Lime Rock and, I assume, Laguna.

    Then there are commercial firms like TracQuest and several others that are pseudo-clubs that have track events all over the country. Last TracQuest event I ran in (at Watkins Glen), the cars on track inlcuded two Indy Lites cars, a couple of Mazda rental cars from the Rochester Airport, a Ferrari 333P and dozens of 911s, Corvettes, Vipers, BMWs, etc. So a Toyota Supra would be right up there. (There indeed was one at the TQ event.)

    Car prep: a helmet and a fire extinguisher is usually it. Street tires and standard seatbelt are fine. Some groups either don’t allow convertibles or require a rollbar.

    My suggestion: get in touch with Laguna and Sears Point and see who runs events there, then go join ’em. YOu might be able to do that on their websites. Many people think racetracks are open on summer weekends and that’s it, but these tracks generally have something going on every day of the week round the year, what with the various clubs, commercial firms, tire tests, magazines renting the track, commercials being shot…and, least of all, actual races.

  • avatar

    I drive a 130-horsepower Mazda Protege5. Yet I find that even Biturbo V8-powered AMG Mercedes often hold me up at traffic lights. Frankly, I’m not sure what people who buy these 450+ horsepower sleds use them for. They never seem to be moving quickly.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    chadillac – you might not realize it, but those supra’s make excellent racing cars… you see them quite a bit in drift races. it is often called a supercar and even the stock turbo i think makes over 300 hp. you have actually quite a ride there. by all means take it to the track!

  • avatar
    Chadillac

    Thanks Stephen. I’ll look into that.

    @dolo-its a decent car, but the 300hp is in the latest iteration. Mine is the MkIII, a 1991, the engine produces 230hp. But it is still fun none the less. Its just no M or Vette or anything.

  • avatar
    Stephan Wilkinson

    Chadillac, it doesn’t matter. I suspect the car is more capable than your personal limits, which isn’t meant as an insult by any means. If and when you can drive a 230-hp car on the track so there’s nothing more to get out of it, you’re the ace of the base. Go for it,and if there’s anything more specific I can help you with, feel free to contact me at [email protected] My hobby, basically, is going to track days and DEs, and I enjoy turning other people on to it. It is huge fun–intimidating at first but it quickly becomes pure fun.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    hey 230 is still huge for a car that size. even the latest sports compacts, like the si and rsx only have 200hp stock. there’s mkIII’s that have been modified to push out 700hp. that car has a serious amount of potential and is probably pretty good as is.

  • avatar

    I have owned 13 Corvettes since 1974. Each has been worked on and raced by me.

    Back then those who owned them did their own wrenching and lived at drag strips or auto-xing on the weekend. If you passed another one you’d wave or even stop and chat, today many have their nose up their ass and think they are hotshots.

    The Corvette world changed when GM put jerks in charge of the Corvette for the release of the 1997 C5 Corvette.
    These people truely believed a Corvette was for carshows, caravans and for those who are scared of speeds over 60 MPH and do not have the strength to makes shifts with a manual transmission

    They wanted it so people could get in the car and not have to spread their legs since those on charge felt the car needed to be sold to women.

    The clutch and shifter are for wimps and so those of us who really drive them for what they are all about find the drivetrain to be far weaker then the powertrain.

    The riceball vendors did their part to make “sports car” mean any little 4 banger with a fartpipe labled a sportscar thus saying you have one means nothing now.

    Add the morons who sell so called performance mods such as $500 aircleaners and lots of shiny parts to glue in engine bay and $1,500 headers that do not do much and what had been American’s sport car became a object of how much useless crap can be put on but a badge of honor in how much shiny junk your Corvette has.

    Listen to these people with the new fad of using a static dynoject chassis dyno with bloated performance numbers and the people who have done 50 driving schools and make it look like a race they did and what the Corvette has become with zero interest loans and the buyers who belong in a F-body which no longer GM makes drove those buyers into Corvettes and then treat the car like a stoplight racer. They are more interested in how bad the idle lope is rather then what that does to how the engine management reacts to it.

    Go onto Corvette forums and listen to all the BS performance hypes of claimed “mods” they spent a left lung on but then go to any dragstrip and your lucky to see 2 vettes racing.

    If their vette got 1 rockchip they would have to cry for a week yet they will drive at 55 MPH in 6th gear and when they are coming to a stop they put trannie in neutral and coast to a stop or leave it in 4th gear and forget they did and leave a stoplight in 4th

    Today with the new Z06 Corvette I have seen at least 12 of them totalled out and most had less then 2,000 mile on them because the cult took over and those buying a Corvette the last 10 years, most belong in a riceburner or buy the car solely for an investment and have no clue how to handle 500 HP

    You know how bad it has come when these owners do not even know how to change to motor oil and have zero clue what a sparkplug does and really believe all performance gains are from aircleaners or CATback exhaust system so in the end GM builds the car for “wazers” and not us racers :-(

  • avatar
    jhiiidoc

    You are right Frank…there are a large number of vette owners that pose there vettes more than drive them. I recently attended a Vette club meeting in a neighboring city, and all of the members were in awe at the fact that I had driven 50 miles to the meeting. The President said he had trouble getting members to drive across town!!

    I tried garaging my Vette to keep the milage down, but now, I ask “why”? I truly enjoy driving this car…so I’m gonna drive it. Am I driving the resale value down??? Yes. But, as you said, the car was meant to be driven. Open my hood, the only obvious mods are the headers and the Blackwing Air Filter. I’ve had my Vette up to 170mph on a deserted NM highway (my God was that a rush), and I’ve driven her from NC to NM and back three times in the last 4 years. What a fantastic roadcar (and I usually drove above the speed limit…unless the radar/laser detector was beeping). And know that not all of the seemingly bling-bling Corvette crowd is not inclined to punch their babies occasionally. One “older” woman in our club in NM has a Magnuson SC, cutouts, and 3.73’s, and a ton of chrome underhood parts on hers and was asked to pull off of the Phoenix Raceway Open Track day because her car was going too fast for the field, and was banned from the local strip until she put a cage in her car because she pulled a sub-12 sec 1/4. So have heart and know that not all the Vette owners have blue blood. There are a lot of us out there that know that the car was meant to be driven, even in the rain, even cross-country, even at speed. Remember that most people buy these cars as status symbols, not for the driving experience. After all…it is a Vette!!!

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