By on February 3, 2017

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If you’re going to a party to watch the big game this Sunday, there’s a good chance pizza will be on the menu.

According to the good folks at the National Restaurant Association, Super Bowl Sunday is the biggest day of the year for the pizza industry. Pizza Hut will sell at least 2 million pies and Domino’s expects to sell over 12 million slices.

Why are we talking about pizza at a car publication? Well, since game watchers will be too busy, erm, watching the game, they’ll likely have their pizzas delivered. If that pizza comes from your local Domino’s, it’ll be delivered by this: the Domino’s DXP.

Domino’s Pizza founder Tom Monaghan is proof you don’t need to be a genius to succeed.

To give you an idea of Mr. Monaghan’s idea of smart, he hired a legendary college football coach, Bo Schembechler, to run the Detroit Tigers. Then Monaghan had Schembechler fire another legend, Cooperstown entrant and famed broadcaster Ernie Harwell, only to fire Schembechler himself the following year as Monaghan prepared to sell the team to competing pizza baron Mike Ilitch, the founder of Little Caesars.

Good ideas are more common than you think. Leibniz and Newton both developed calculus, independently of each other. The smartest idea I ever had was if I have a good idea, chances are someone else already thought of it. While good ideas are not that rare, people who persevere are noteworthy.

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Monaghan had one good idea — cheap pizza delivered for free — and he worked it very hard. He and his brother bought a pizza shop named Domi-Nick’s in Ypsilanti, Michigan in 1960, the idea being that students at the local Eastern Michigan University and the University of Michigan in nearby Ann Arbor would be a ready and hungry market.

about_history_60s

Getting back to this being is a car site, and not one for foodies, I’ll point out Volkswagen Beetles loom large in Domino’s lore. As a matter of fact, a year after the Monaghan brothers bought the pizzeria, Tom bought out his sibling’s half share in the business by bartering a VW Bug.

In the early days, Domino’s used a variety of delivery vehicles, including a Checker Marathon, but Monaghan started using a fleet of Beetles with dominos painted on the sides after opening up a branch in Ann Arbor and renaming the company Domino’s in 1965 (either to make it easier to pronounce or avoid confusion with a restaurant named Dominick’s on the UofM campus, which also served pizza). Tom even had custom warming ovens made to fit in the back of a Bug, which replaced the rear seats.

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Monaghan had some love for domestic brands, too. There are archival photos of him in front of the former American Motors headquarters taking delivery of an American Motors Javelin. It was painted in the red, white, and blue racing livery of the Penske/Donohue Trans Am series AMC cars, complete with an illuminated Domino’s roof sign.

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The company that was once worth a couple of used Volkswagens was sold by Monaghan in the late 1990s for about a billion dollars, and delivery is still a fundamental part of its business. Over the years, the company has experimented with a variety of vehicles to get you your pizza while it’s still hot, including motor scooters and electric cars. It’s shown robotic concepts and maybe it’s experimenting with drone delivery as I type this, but currently the firm famous for delivering oven fresh pizzas is, ahem, heated up about the Domino’s DXP, a dedicated delivery vehicle custom designed to fill a few roles for franchisees. The DXP acronym stands for Delivery Expert.

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Working with Local Motors, Domino’s crowdsourced suggestions for a bespoke delivery vehicle about three years ago. Once it had a design brief, Domino’s brought in former GM R&D exec Ken Baker and Roush Industries to bring it to life.

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Rather than build something from scratch, the team settled on the 2015 Chevy Spark. Why the Spark? Domino’s has franchises all around the world and the Korean designed Spark is one of GM’s global vehicles. Also, the company had to consider interior capacity vs exterior size, safety features, and fuel economy. The Spark fit the bill.

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Why a dedicated vehicle? Most Domino’s delivery workers use their own cars and are compensated for their vehicles’ use based on a mileage basis. (Domino’s was sort of the Uber of pizzas before there was an Uber.) A dedicated vehicle owned by the franchisees allows them to hire from a much wider pool of potential employees. Not everyone has a car and not everyone who has one wants it to smell like pepperoni.

A more traditional Domino's pizza delivery vehicle, most likely owned by the driver.

A more traditional Domino’s pizza delivery vehicle, most likely owned by the driver.

General Motors was involved in the project, mostly in a supportive role, while the bulk of the work was done by Baker, Roush and Domino’s own personnel. The cars were purchased by Domino’s through GM Fleet Sales and the pizza shops take delivery from a local Chevy dealer.

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The response from franchisees was much greater than anticipated. Domino’s initially planned on selling just 10 or 20 DXPs, but Domino’s decided to expand the program after it brought the prototype to a franchisee rally and ended up with 100 orders, representing 25 markets.

With thousands of stores, that’s only a single digit percentage take rate, but the DXP is seen as augmenting, not replacing, the current delivery fleet. In any case, the response was so good that Domino’s ordered up another 50 DXPs from Roush. There was just one problem: the DXP has a built-in pizza warming oven accessible from outside the car via a remote controlled hatch mounted into the no-longer-usable driver side rear door. GM changed the Spark just enough for the 2016 model year that the DXP’s special kit won’t fit later Sparks. Domino’s and Roush had to scour the country looking for new-old-stock ’15 Sparks.

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The cars are purchased by the franchises, but Domino’s retains right of first refusal to prevent their resale to the public. At the end of their lifecycle, the DXPs will likely be crushed. A Domino’s executive told me the company doesn’t want ratty old cars hurting the company’s image once they are in private hands. That’s a bit ironic in light of the condition of many of those employee-owned delivery vehicles.

When the driver’s door is opened, it triggers a safety light that illuminates the ground in front of the hatch. The DXP also has something it shares with very high-end luxury cars: fitted luggage. There are two custom warming bags when an order calls for more pizzas than the oven can fit. Now a single seater, the interior has been reworked to accommodate up to 80 pizzas, with attendant salads and drinks. There are bins and cubbies for the food, napkins, flatware and whatever else the driver might need to make a successful pizza run. Though you can’t hose the DXP out, the storage areas have been designed for easy cleaning.

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I’m not sure if the red and white graphics on the base white Spark are painted on or a vinyl wrap, but there are a number of vinyl decals with cutesy labels, like a warning not to put pizza sauce in the fuel filler. All of the Chevrolet logos have been removed and replaced with Domino’s or DXP graphics. Even the wheel center caps have a Domino’s domino. Considering that franchises have to buy them, however, the ad space allotted for the local store, an address below the door handles, could be larger. In general, the DXP’d Spark looks cheerful.

It’s too early in the experiment to see if the DXP has boosted pizza sales, but they’re tracking brand sentiment. So far, the general feeling is it’s been a good investment for the franchisees. Some have even bought a second DXP. Currently, the program is restricted to the continental United States.

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Domino’s headquarters is in Ann Arbor, less than an hour from my home, and the nice folks there arranged for me to test drive a DXP owned by the Domino’s store closest to its HQ, an independently owned franchisee of Pies Inc. The store manager told me the DXP is very popular with both employees and customers. Students at the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan in nearby Ypsilanti specifically request it. I forgot to ask if they tip better when their pizzas come in the DXP.

While I didn’t get to fully test it by delivering pizzas, I did get a chance to tool around north Ann Arbor on the same roads used by the franchise’s drivers.

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Other than the revised interior, it’s like any other Chevrolet Spark from the driver’s seat, except for obscured vision over your left shoulder because of the warming oven. There’s also a non-factory switch next to the USB port in front of the console that controls the removable illuminated sign on the roof.

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This particular DXP had about 23,000 miles on it, so it had delivered a few pizzas, but it didn’t look worse for wear. One of the tires had a slow leak, which they took care of with a fix-a-flat can before I drove it, but it wasn’t like I was going to pull 1g on a skid pad. Actually, that’s a thought: load up the DXP with pizzas, drinks and salads and see what kind of lateral acceleration you can pull before food starts a flying. The “Passenger Air Bag Off” light was illuminated because there isn’t a passenger air bag — or passenger seat for the matter. Once I figured out the controls, the A/C started blowing cold, though one of the drivers told me cooling is marginal with a full load of pizzas on a hot day.

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In terms of driving dynamics, it’s a 2015 Chevy Spark, which actually makes it a decent sedan delivery. While our esteemed colleague Mr. Baruth found the CVT equipped ’15 Spark to have “adequate” freeway acceleration, he was driving it in the middle of winter, albeit below the Mason-Dixon line. I drove the Domino’s DXP in the middle of last summer’s late heat wave with the outside temperature in the high 90s. With the air conditioning on, as I’d expect it would be with a hot oven and 80 pizzas in the back, the DXP is dog slow, and I’m not talking about greyhounds. It is, however, easy to maneuver on city streets, likely another reason for Domino’s choosing the Spark along with hopefully city fuel economy. That last hope may be a bit unfulfilled as the instrument panel indicated a cumulative 28 mpg.

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Actually, while the DXP can carry more than six-dozen pizzas, that’s for corporate catering and special events. The typical Domino’s delivery order, I’m told, is one pie, one side order, and a couple of drinks.

In any case, the Domino’s DXP is a clever idea from a company that has a history of using clever delivery vehicles. While driving the DXP, my route took me right past UofM’s MCity autonomous vehicle research facility. Perhaps at a party for Super Bowl LXI (that LXI sounds like a trim line on a Honda, doesn’t it?) your pizza will be delivered to your door by a drone launched from an autonomous DXP at the curb.

[Image Source: Ronnie Schreiber, Domino’s]

Domino’s corporate headquarters arranged the drive. The local franchisee, Pies Inc., on Plymouth Rd. in Ann Arbor, Michigan provided the Domino’s DXP delivery vehicle, gasoline, and insurance. No free pizza, though.

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78 Comments on “Game Day Delivery: Domino’s DXP, a Bespoke Pizza Delivery Vehicle...”


  • avatar
    dal20402

    Too bad Domino’s pizza has the texture and taste of soggy cardboard.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      You’re supposed to take it out of the box first. :P

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The box is the best part.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          While your point is valid about Domino’s, I’m surprised it’s a guy from Seattle that brings it up. Pizza was one thing that left very much to be desired while I lived there.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Point is 100% valid. Although there are some new artisan pizza spots in town that are very good, although expensive.

            Still, the local 800-pound gorilla of delivery pizza, Pagliacci, is to Domino’s as a new Camry is to an ’82 Citation with the Iron Duke.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Smoking Monkey in Renton was decent. Ate there last year.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @DW the interesting thing about Smoking Monkey is that it has an automotive connection. The building was once owned by Good Chevrolet, the showroom was on the corner. That building housed the fleet and lease dept and living near Renton at the time I selected them as the pickup point for my new company vehicle in 1989. The park across the street had been the sales lot for their Conversion van business on one side and the other was the Mazda dealer After forcing the auto dealers out, the city spent several million making that park and redoing the former shop portion of the Mazda dealer into a crappy events center.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @dal20402

            So it is reliably dull and boring?

          • 0 avatar

            Strange that Seattle doesn’t have good pie, because it’s pretty amazing in Portland.

        • 0 avatar
          WheelMcCoy

          Do you eat it with a fork?

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Scoutdude – That happens a lot when over-zealous city planners try and force such things (it’s hit or miss).

            I ate at Smoking Monkey on a Friday or Saturday night (forgot the exact night, but it was one of the two), and the downtown area of Renton I was in was not exactly hopping (it was nice little area, though, given what I had heard about Renton; other areas were sketchy, near the Boeing “yard”).

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Pizza Hut Meat Lover’s Pizza on a Deep Pan crust. That, and the brewski of your choice.

      Life is good.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Although most franchised chains have awful pizza, Michigan has an unenviable distinction of being the origin of some of the worst pizza giants the world knows, including Domino’s, Little Caesar’s and Hungry Howie’s.

      Little Caesar’s and Hungry Howie’s should be illegal and shut down unless they discontinue using the noun “pizza” to describe their product.

      Domino’s arguably (tenuously) meets the bare standard.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        But the area also has some of the country’s best pizza. I find it pretty hard to top a Detroit style deapdish from places like Buddy’s or Shield’s.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          It should be a violation of consumer protection laws for deep dish pizza to be advertised as “pizza.” The stuff is foul.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            I think you are thinking of either Chicago style deapdish or the crap Pizzahut and Little Caesars sell. A good Detroit style pizza is much better. If you’re ever in town try Buddy’s or Cloverleaf like DW suggested.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            that Chicago nonsense is a borderline casserole.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Cloverleaf is good (original one).

          Buddy’s can be good depending on location.

          Shield’s has tone downhill, IMO.

          Supino is very good.

          Alibi Inn is very good.

          DAL – They just built 2 MOD pizza’s near me? Is it good?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I’m a fan of MOD, but then again I’m biased because they are a client of mine. It’s not gourmet pizza, but it’s amazingly good for something that you can get made in such a short time.

            It also helps that MOD fixes the kind of pizza I like — thin crust, very hot oven, not too heavy/greasy.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I did not know they were a client of yours.

            I want to get a copy of their UFOC for a friend who already owns 7 other franchised locations (mainly YUM!).

            I see that they just raised 77 million in funding (I am curious as to the terms).

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Cloverleaf is good (original one).”

            Gus Guerra’s in Eastpointe? now I’m ashamed to admit I don’t remember if I’ve ever been there.

            if you want something different, try the sfinguini from Bommarito’s on Mack in St. Clair Shores.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I’m not involved with that side of the business and couldn’t share documents even if I were, but here’s what they have to say publicly about franchising:

            http://modpizza.com/franchising/

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            I haven’t had Shield’s in a while so I have to take your word for it. I forgot about Cloverleaf, and just found out they opened a location near me.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Mr. C’s Deli (if there are any left) is good eating — used the Buscheimi’s (sp?) recipe, IIRC.

          Is the original Cloverleaf the one on Harper in The Shores?

          Domino’s is cardboard crust, with cheese like wallpaper paste, even after a “reset” a few years back. They are to pizza what McDonald’s is to hamburgers.

          A Toledo-area chain, Marco’s, is much better, and is exploding onto the scene around the country, but not much into Michigan north of Monroe. (And starting today, you can’t get here from there — I-75 is closed downriver to repave the Rouge River Bridge, among other things, for the next TWO YEARS!)

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            there are two, one on 10 Mile in Roachville and the other on Mack just south of 7.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Original Cloverleaf is south of 10 mile on Gratiot, next to BMW dealership.

            Loui’s, which I forgot to mention before, is also pretty good (much saucier than Buddy’s).

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        You have to admit all those guys made serious money. Maybe not Starbux money, but serious money.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “There are archival photos of him in front of the former American Motors headquarters”

    I worked in that building. Its current state is depressing.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Wow, 20 years almost…

    In July 1997 I got my first ever vehicle, a 97 Dodge Dakota 5-speed 4-cylinder.

    In August 1997 I started delivering pizza part time for Domino’s to help cover the loan payment. What a crazy time.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Separated at birth?:

    http://www.autoguide.com/gallery/gallery.php/?g2_view=largephotos.Largephotos&g2_itemId=288608

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/dominos-dxp-the-truth-about-cars-IMG_0095-1.jpg

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Garbage, delivered in 20 minutes or less.
    .
    .

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Be nice. I hail from Ground Zero of pizza kingdom (New Haven) and even I will give a head nod of respect to Dominos – it’s the only pizza available to large swaths of America, and it’s not too costly.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Humpf! Down by me, Domino’s was about a buck more per pie than the other places! Inflation reigns (Super?) supreme though — never thought I’d ever see a coupon price of two large “specialty” ‘zzas for $30, which just happened when everyone else “adjusted” prices last month!

        (Last week, however, I took advantage of a Groupon offer for $10 large specialty pizzas from Papa John’s! Not bad!)

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Frank Pepe’s or Sally’s?

        (I’ve eaten at neither, and have never been to Yale…err, New Haven, CT, but saw them featured on some show about pizza)

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    They’ve bought 150? That’s better than I thought they would do.

  • avatar
    Jean-Pierre Sarti

    the franchises around my neck of the woods almost all have them. must be the same owner.

    i’m curious how the pay structure is changed for the driver if they use this thing versus personal. i mean part of getting paid as driver must be more than than wear and tear on your car right? you still have to deal with the weirdos out there.

    not a fan of the pizza but then again this is a car blog and above all to each his own…

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      The weirdos weren’t all ‘out there,’ regrettably. Some of them were right amongst us.

      I worked with this guy. He got let go after getting too many tickets, and then, as you will see, took another career path:

      http://www.clarkprosecutor.org/html/death/US/green1102.htm

      There’s actually more to it than that. Before he got fired, there was another local c-store robbery in which the owner got shot and killed. The authorities never pinned that on Green, but they were pretty sure it was him. If it indeed was, then the robbery/homicide took place while he was out on a delivery.

      Thinking back to all the nights we worked together, with all that cash in the store waiting to be deposited… he could have waxed the entire staff and made off with a few grand. That gives you chills.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Cool article, Ronnie!

  • avatar
    Dawnrazor

    Domino’s has done some interesting marketing stuff over the past few years, and I am not surprised at all by the bespoke delivery vehicles.

    They also recently commissioned a pinball machine, which actually looks like a lot of fun (avoid the Noid!). It was ostensibly intended for installation at Domino’s locations, but is also for sale to the public:
    http://www.spookypinball.com/games-swag/
    (I have not played Domino’s, but the Rob Zombie and America’s Most Haunted games are a blast!)

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      This one made Domino’s seem pretty cool to my childhood self:

      http://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/images1/1/1014/14/tyco-c-indy-turbo-boost-race-car-30_1_51a33f0f380e9d2c475879eb856b6b75.jpg

      I think the head even turned with the steering.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    I doubt many of these will see service.

    Given the type of use and what delivery drivers are paid and how they’re compensated for using their own cars it’s far more profitable for the company to continue as at present. Delivery drivers are basically selling their cars to the employers, cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      Erikstrawn

      This. The bespoke Dominos rides will only last until some accountant realizes they can save X amount of dollars by making chumps out of employees. People who have to pay the electric bill next week don’t worry about how they’re going to drive to work in six months. I think it’s more marketing gimmick than anything else.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      In the small town where I lived in Pennsylvania, the operator of the local Domino’s had a fleet of strippo Ford Ranger pickup trucks.

      Honestly, I can’t see the logic in having these delivery vehicles in a franchised business like Domino’s. I would think that it would be huge drag on profits having to license, insure and keep up a vehicle.

      Maybe the branding aspect is worth it in certain markets, but you’d have a hard time convincing me.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Surprised the franchise owner down by me in the Toledo area didn’t pick one of these up — he’s their record-holder for most pizzas made in a given time period, plus his stores pretty much print money! (Likely the reason he could charge slightly above market price for inferior product. Though, to their credit, the Cali Chicken Bacon pizza is pretty good; if I can ever find a coupon for it, that is!)

  • avatar
    mgbjack

    Great choice. GM killed the Spark.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    This has as many seats as the Challenger SRT Demon. New class of cars developing?

  • avatar

    edit-sorry bout that !

    I’m from NYC. ALL chain pizza is horrible. All of it.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    Dominos have the DRU Robot in Australia. Australian Franchise owns several other national Franchises and is the biggest outside NA
    https://www.dominos.com.au/inside-dominos/technology/dru

  • avatar
    Jimal

    This is slightly better than the fleet of Yugos the pizza delivery place I worked for in high school had.

    I’m fortunate that there are enough good local pizza places where I live that none of the chain stores (Domino’s, Pizza Hut, Papa John’s) have bothered trying to set up shop.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I used to work with a guy who had been married and divorced three times (with kids, too!) before he was 30. To say he had a few obligations was an understatement.

    He would deliver newspapers in the morning with an old VW Bully, work an eight hour maintenance shift at our print shop and then deliver pizzas all night long. He ripped all but the driver’s seat out of one of an early 1970’s Honda Civic, and filled the space with wire racks of his own fabrication.

    Finally the Bully died, and he did all the newspapers and pizzas from the Honda. The Honda was something of a maintenance nightmare, as it probably had close to 300K miles on it by then. It looked as tired and dirty as he did.

  • avatar
    Dave W

    When I first heard of these I thought of Neal Stephensons “Snow Crash” A post apocalyptic world that opens with a pizza delivery gone horribly wrong
    “The Deliverator’s car has enough potential energy packed into its batteries to fire a pound of bacon into the Asteroid Belt. Unlike a bimbo box or a Burb beater, the Deliverator’s car unloads that power through gaping, gleaming, polished sphincters. When the Deliverator puts the hammer down, stuff happens. You want to talk contact patches? Your car’s tires have tiny contact patches, talk to the asphalt in four places the size of your tongue. The Deliverator’s car has big sticky tires with contact patches the size of a fat lady’s thighs. The Deliverator is in touch with the road, starts like a bad day, stops on a peseta.

    Why is the Deliverator so equipped? Because people rely on him. He is a roll model. This is America. People do whatever they feel like doing, you got a problem with that?”

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I prefer their 80’s vintage delivery cars:

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qzUiBPGtQOQ/maxresdefault.jpg

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    As someone diagnosed with OCD, I have a hard time with little things like getting my pizza delivered. I flat out refused to do this. It irritates my wife if it is one of those nights where it has gotten late and neither of us wants to prepare dinner.

    I started to get my pizza on a carryout basis back in college when the delivery driver rolled up in a filthy-looking early-90s Escort. The windows were grubby, the dash was littered with paper. I was that disgusted that I think I threw the pizza out later that evening.

    I think company-owned cars may be a little better. In a perfect world, perhaps the manager of the place would be at least somewhat interested in keeping them sanitary. In a perfect world, maybe the local health inspector would take a look at the fleet when they made their rounds. I bet in either case it’s not the reality.

    Either way, I carry out my pizza. I can’t stand the thought of my food being transported in a car that may be borderline biohazard. I just get it myself, then put it in my trunk as I hate the smell of food in my car. That’s another OCD trigger of mine…

    • 0 avatar
      Driver8

      I’d stay out of the back of most restaurants if I were you.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “I’d stay out of the back of most restaurants if I were you.”

        It’s warm comfort that the pizza is heated in a 900° oven before you eat it – probably why pizza-related food poisonings don’t seem to be a trend.

        • 0 avatar
          Jimal

          You have no idea. I continued to work at night at the pizza place while I went to tech school during the day, and started msking pizzas in addition to driving Yugos to deliver them. I can’t think of many days when my hands weren’t at least a little grungy, with a little dirt under my nails from working on cars all day.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Stopped getting delivery when all the pizza joints started charging a delivery fee.

      And I put pizza in the trunk as well! Can’t stand the lingering eau de ‘Zza come Tuesday morning!

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Yeah…you do NOT want to see nor know what goes on in the kitchen area of ANY restaurant (I don’t care if it’s fast food or high end, it will absolutely horrify you).

      I know of precisely two places in a 4-million, 4-county metro area that I know have extremely high standards of cleanliness and standards of kitchen workers. I don’t even want to think about the other places I eat at.

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    I had a 1996 Chrysler Concorde LXi, and although it was lavishly equipped, it was no Honda. I’d rather drive a DXP than own that Large Hell (LH) unreliable, money sucking wh0re.

    LXi were the first fuel injected Accords. They got their own trim like later the V-6 did for awhile.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Yet your username is a car famous for grenading transaxles.

    • 0 avatar
      PentastarPride

      I feel sorry for you. My ’97 Concorde (and ’04 Intrepid) was the exact opposite of your experience. My Concorde was like new, even after 10 years, as I bought it from someone who babied it and had all the maintenance records for the whole 44,000 miles of its life.

      The only major repair on his end was a radiator. On my end? Nothing major. Same with my 2004 Intrepid. No major problems at all.

      The maintenance schedule just has to be followed from start to finish, and not just by you or every other owner.

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        My Sister had a 1997 Intrepid 3.3 that had a bad/burned valve from new. It was in and out of the shop multiple times until it hit the extended warranty- then fixed immediately. She drove the car without a hiccup another 140,000 miles(something like 175k when it was sent to the crusher) and still complains, to this day.

        She’s never had a car she didn’t mistreat– never had a car that didn’t have cola-soaked upholstery, and she’s never had a car that wasn’t carrying around 500 extra pounds of junk– yet somehow her cars always last around 200k miles, despite. It’s inexpiable.

        She’s currently riding a 3900 Impala into the ground. Always bad axles, mounts and brakes/traction control troubles.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Years ago there was a Seattle area pizza chain, Pizza Haven, that had their own delivery vehicles. They were C10s with the tail gate removed and a rather large oven in the back. I think the oven was propane powered and the trucks probably were too. Apparently their original model in their U District restaurant was to fill the trucks with pizzas and then radio the orders to the truck as they came in. Later they switched to make to order and then send the truck out when they had enough orders. I remember it could take 1 to 1.5 hrs to get your pizza.

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      “I remember it could take 1 to 1.5 hrs to get your pizza.”

      This, and the Chef Boy-Ar-Dee “Pizza Kit” (blecch) are why DiGiorno’s is a thing these days.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Used to deliver for Pizza Hut in my xD (I live in a town where half of delivery vehicles are the stereotypical beater, half of them are brand new leased vehicles, plus a few lovingly maintained concours-condition old Rangers and Caprices) and loved that job, got paid 3$ per delivery/other errand they sent me on plus tips, so never had any obligation to do anything else at the restaurant. Didn’t get paid on mileage but the furthest I had to go was probably 15kms away. Made an average of $14 an hour (lots of money when I still lived with my parents) over the year and a half I worked there, which is still more than I make now working a semi-legitimate job with healthcare benefits.

    Would love to do it again but only if I had another car specifically for it, never doing it in a leased car with a mileage limit again. Nor do I want to go through brake parts that fast again either.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I hope a couple escape the crusher and make it into the hands of a collector. Twenty years from now this would be a brain melting cars and coffee vehicle with a crazy backstory.

  • avatar
    Carzzi

    uncle enzo’s cosa nostra pizza


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