By on April 24, 2014

 

coconut

Hi Steve,

What would be the most reliable car I can purchase for about $7000-8000? And what would be the upper limit on mileage that I would even consider?

Steve writes:

I grew up in the food import business. So to me, the answer to this question is a lot like asking my Dad, “What is the best cake I can get for $70?”

He would probably tell you that it depends on your ingredients, your cooking methods, your recipe, and what parts of the ingredients matter to you the most.

The ingredients when it comes to a used car is… the prior owner.

Like a pitcher in baseball who has an overwhelming influence over the outcome of the game, the prior owner’s maintenance habits and driving style has the greatest impact on the longevity of the vehicle when you’re shopping at this lower price range.

The cooking methods are… your own driving style and maintenance regimen. The way you cook those ingredients once you get them determines a lot of that long-term reliability.

My father’s Lincolns were rarely driven hard, and he took fantastic care of his cars. My mom was a rolling hurricane who routinely beat her cars to an inch of their metallic being. Some cars can easily handle the obscenity that is a person shifting from reverse to drive while in motion (Crown Vics come to mind), while other cars would likely be recycled into Chinese washing machines within five years (Chevy Aveo).

You need to be honest about the type of driver you are, the type of driving you do, and the types of wear you have commonly seen in your past vehicles. A diesel is often better for mountainous highways than an older hybrid, and a Lincoln Town Car will likely be a better fit for potholed streets than a Mitsubishi Lancer.

The recipe is usually… the manufacturer.  The ways you get to enjoy it depends on the way they built it.

Cars have their own unique manufacturing tolerances and varying quality levels built into their 180,000+ parts. Honda makes wonderful manual transmissions. Toyota is a world-class manufacturer of hybrids. GM and Ford make highly reliable full-sized trucks and SUVs, and BMW along with Porsche have offered sports cars that were truly the best in the business. The manufacturer that offers the best match for your automotive tastes will impact your reliability because, you will likely be willing to invest in the best parts if that car offers what you consider to be the optimal driving experience.

Does it sound like I’m evading your questions? Well, let me toss around the ingredients that matter to you the most then and give you a solid answer.

If cars to you are like water… no taste is the best taste… and you drive about 50 to 60 miles per hour on flat, boring, mundane roads, then find yourself a 2007 Toyota Corolla. Get a low mileage version with a 5-speed that was driven by a prior owner who knew how to handle a stick. 07′ was the last year of that particular generation and historically, vehicles that are later in their model runs tend to have fewer issues.

If cars are a matter of sport and passion, I have an incredibly weak spot in my heart for second generation Miatas. A low mileage version owned by a Miata enthusiast is a helluva deal. Here in the southern US, an 03 or 04 with around 60k miles would sell for around $7000. I also like the Honda S2000 and the BMW Z4. Those will have higher miles than the Miata, and the Z4 in particular may not match the Miata for reliability alone. But those two models may offer certain ingredients that are more appealing to you.

Finally, if you’re looking for that same automotive luxury and richness as a five layer coconut cake filled with Godiva chocolate flakes, and coconut that was flown directly from the Polynesian Island of Tofoa, the sad news is there are no reliable $7000 Rolls-Royces or Bentleys. However a 2001 Infiniti Q45 is a frequently overlooked luxury model that I would keep a keen eye on if I had $7000 to spend on a ‘rich’ car. One with less than 100k miles, if you can find it, would be a fantastic deal.

Oh well, gotta go and exercise. My morning cake came from an article I wrote a couple of days ago and I now have to remove all the calories that are stuck in my big fat head.

 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

184 Comments on “New Or Used? : The Most Reliable Car In The USA Is A …....”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    That article you wrote on the 10 most reliable used cars was interesting. Cars you would never expect to be on that list. You certainly got your share of differing opinions over on Yahoo, as if you were personally responsible for the cars that made the list.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    The newest, lowest millage Lexus ES you can find. Or a Land Cruiser.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      Yeah! A Land Cruiser!

      I can get one of those for about 20k… with about 100k+ miles on it.

      Where do I sign???

      • 0 avatar
        brenschluss

        I think Land Cruisers came from the factory with 100k on them. That’s the test cycle.

        I’ve never seen one with less.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        For $7-8k you’re looking at one which is at least 18 years old, with at least 180k miles. With terrible parts prices, a worn out interior, and poor MPG for daily driving. Dandy advice.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          Oh mighty Lords of the Internet Automotive Realm, forgive my lack of eternal vigilance in pricing spectrum of secondhand vehicles. It seems my glorious follies have only lead me to reap the fruit of virgin vehicles.

  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    > New Or Used? : The Most Reliable Car In The USA Is A ….

    Horse.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “However a 2001 Infiniti Q45 is a frequently overlooked luxury model that I would keep a keen eye on if I had $7000 to spend on a ‘rich’ car.”

    I don’t know much about the second gen Q45, but for 7-10K I would imagine a late LS400/early LS430 could be had in similar condition, which is what I would buy between the two.

    • 0 avatar
      DeeDub

      winner winner chicken dinner

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The Q is probably not a good choice.

      Honestly, if you’re considering a luxury-ish car, any Lexus, any Acura (excepting anything with a V6 and an automatic made between 98-04) and the Lincoln Town Car as decent choices.

      You could consider an E39 5-Series as well. They’re not super reliable, but the repair and spare-parts ecosystem aren’t bad.

      • 0 avatar
        TOTitan

        I have owned 1995 and 2003 Q45′s. They both went over 200,000 miles without issues. The only reason I sold the 03 is that my wife ran over a big rock and damaged both the steering rack and the stainless steel exhaust system. With so many miles it just wasnt worth spending the kind of money it would have taken to fix it right.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      I’ve known several people looking to drive high mileage in this type of vehicle target the Q specifically because it doesn’t have the recognition / popularity of the LS.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave in Toronto

      Might want to avoid the 430′s with the navigation center console ie screen.

      Or look into the failure rate.

      I know someone it happened to and did some reading at that time, imo there was a pattern to be seen on the net of failure. Not a big one, but there.

      And, the failure affected the HVAC controls as well and was quite expensive in parts to rectify.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I just last November sold my GS430, which was an 01 with nav. The screen worked perfectly, all the time.

        • 0 avatar
          myheadhertz

          AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMEN! I have a 2004 Lexus GX470 with the factory Nav along with the 2013 update disc ($160). Worthless POS. Instead, I use an older Tom Tom on a RAM mount, screwed to the lower portion of the center console. Usually only need the voice directions. (Dash mounted external GPS antenna.)

          • 0 avatar
            WaftableTorque

            The problem with the Lexus navigation DVD’s is that they have very little coverage outside urban areas, so township and range road grids don’t show up. I haven’t bothered to update mine since 2006.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            I love the GX. Three days before I met one of my best childhood friends, his dad had purchased a brand-new 2004 GX 470, black with beige interior, and the navigation/Mark Levinson package. Ten years later, he still has it and it runs beautifully, though he’s complaining about some kind of dashboard-cracking issue that’s apparently a defect with these. The 2008 facelift was nice, but I didn’t like that they added chrome door handles; it looked better without them. This is kind of silly, but the GX holds a special place in my heart for being the first car that I ever saw with an auto-tilt/telescopic steering column (even though that feature had been around for over a decade).

            I kind of want a large SUV, so my next car will either be a first-gen GX or one of the better-built Volvo XC90 variations (as in, *not* the early T6/GM transmission combo).

      • 0 avatar
        DeeDub

        Always avoid factory navigation on older used cars. Not because it might be broken. Not even because you probably can’t get current map data for it anymore. Avoid it because oldtimey nav systems with their Atari graphics look more dated than a cassette deck.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Do not concur. While they might be dated, when I sold my GS every_single_caller/email asked to verify it had the nav, or said “I’m looking for one with the nav.”

          Even if it -does- look outdated, you still HAVE it. Sort of like the old style xenon lamps versus HiD ones – you’ve still got em.

          • 0 avatar
            DeeDub

            Any $70 Garmin or the phone in your pocket will look and work better. Being locked into an obsolete version of a rapidly advancing technology is silly. I believe you that lots of people asked you about nav when you sold your GS. I also believe that lots of people are dumb. :)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            It makes a difference in functionality and the mentality of the used buyer. MOST people still don’t have factory nav in their cars, even today. So for a buyer getting something for <$9K which had:

            RWD
            Lexus badge
            Heated leather
            Premium sound, Nakachimi?
            Factory Xenon
            V8
            Nav
            <110K miles

            Is a good deal.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Yes, the Q45 had a less reliable interior, and a more finnicky, lower-production 4.1 V8. It also didn’t age as well, though I did like the Anniversary Edition special trim.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      There’s an LS400 in our neighbourhood that’s been sitting in a person’s driveway for quite a while. They recently put a cover on it which has now blown most of the way off. My wife asked what was so special about the car. So I told her it’s an LS400 and it’s a pretty historic car for Toyota. Looks like the thing needs a good cleaning but even in the shape it’s in it’s still desirable from a distance.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      The V8 in that Q had a weird problem with crankshaft position sensors that would render the car undriveable. Other than that pretty much bulletproof

    • 0 avatar
      AlexMcD

      I think that there is no question there will be better service support and available aftermarket parts options for the Lexus. I tried to find parts for an Infinity and they were nearly impossible to find. Lexus, everyone had, in stock.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Without knowing the maintenance history of a vehicle, it’s hard to predict. I’d prefer to know that the AT fluid/filter has been changed every 25k miles, but few owners share my concern for this.

    Drivetrain-wise, typically a modestly-powered car is the best bet. No 2.0 Ecoboost Explorers, no 6.4L Hemis, or V6 Accords. A 4-cylinder Camry is a great cockroach.

    Fewer gadgets means fewer failures, too. Electronics can be worse to deal with than drivetrains.

    It can be worth shopping in a flatter region, too. This means the transmission, brakes, and body will be in better shape, because the roads won’t have received as much salt, and obviously the transmission will not have shifted as much.

    Sometimes the most reliable car is the one that’s paid for, even if it nickels-and-dimes you once in a while.

    Also consider the cost of replacement parts – check out Rock Auto to get a taste of what your candidate car’s parts cost. My beater 01 Elantra has been a nickel-and-dimer, but its parts are dirt cheap. Try replacing the side mirror on an Audi for $30. Cheap parts can soften the blow of any unreliability you encounter.

    • 0 avatar
      sco

      All good points. Just went through this buying a first car with my daughter. We settled on…. 2006 Scion Xa, 60,00 miles, $7000. Hits all the targets-Toyota build quality, well-maintained CA car, end of model year, simple engine, nice safety features, basic electronics, no timing belt to replace, semi-forgotten brand. It may not be the most exciting car but it fits her perfectly and she loves it. Maybe that last part is the most important- you gotta be happy with what you drive.

      • 0 avatar
        bryanska

        You are correct. If you hate the car, you made a bad decision.

        I drove a 2002 Alero, bought new, which was a fantastic financial decision. I couldn’t wait to get rid of this perfectly functional, comfortable, reliable and safe car.

        • 0 avatar
          Loki

          I wouldn’t call the Alero particularly safe. I was hit head on by one and it was an absolute miracle that the other driver survived. There was NO occupant space left.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    2000-2004 Avalon. 2nd gen. (I left out the 99′s.)

    Try killing one. Fully loaded or not.

    “Give it a lickin’, it’ll keep on tickin’.”

    • 0 avatar
      55_wrench

      Dittos to raresleeper.

      I got my 2001 Avalon in 2011 at 123K. It’s at 195,600 and all I’ve done is brakes, tires, fluids and since it was so good to me, a set of struts & new springs on all 4 corners.
      No reason to punish yourself with a Corolla, and the JBL stereo is great.

    • 0 avatar
      vbofw

      I think this may be the last sedan with a bench seat if I’m thinking of the correct Avalon.

      My grandma drives one. Complete with these super-strange covers that hide the stereo interface. I always giggle at awkward Japanese design – for some reason always am fixated with the large, awkward font on every CamCord interior control. Functionality overlooks I suppose.

      Based on this sample of one, agree, the car has been pretty bulletproof.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Fink

      I just got rid of my 2002 base Avalon. Bought it for $9,500 3 years ago. Spent $2,900 keeping it running, then it completely killed it’s engine with under 120,000 miles. Sold it for $1,500. Huge lose for me. I know it’s rare, but mine had a good maintenance history and was a complete piece of crap. I’m sure for every reliable car, there will be a few stories like this.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    With due respect, only sort of helpful. First, although the query didn’t specify, someone looking in this price range should be looking at basic, cheap transportation, not sports cars. Sports cars, whether reliable or not, are toys: they only carry 2 people and very little stuff. (I know; I own one.)

    Secondly, you should have helped the questioner with some guidance about the ’07 Corolla vs. the ’01 Q45. I think 90% of people would choose the Q45 if you told them, it was equivalent to the Corolla in cost of ownership. Is that what you meant to say? Somehow, I doubt it even assuming that everyone knows that the Corolla is going to use less fuel than the Q45.

    Finally, I question recommending a manual transmission car. First off, the number of people who can operate them is diminishing every day. Secondly, the clutch on a manual is very much a “wear item” and is subject to, potentially, a great deal of abuse by the previous owner(s). I believe, replacing a clutch is about $1000 or more parts & labor, even for a domestic car. Admittedly, the smaller pool of manual transmission drivers may result in a manual transmission car selling at a discount relative to the same car with an automatic . . . but there are risks.

    • 0 avatar
      The Heisenberg Cartel

      Lolz, no automotive fun at all for the poors!

    • 0 avatar
      WaftableTorque

      My annual running costs for my 2002 LS430 is ~$4500. $2500 of that is gas to run 12 000 km a year. I haven’t even factored in depreciation. If all the OP can afford is $7k, they’re going to learn the phrase “burn rate” very quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        Japanese Buick

        The LS400, at least the first generation, is not reflective of the maxim that it’s still a $50K car when you maintain it. It has a lot of standard Toyota parts and can be maintained by Toyota mechanics quite easily. The only high end maint cost is the 90k timing belt and water pump change.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      ..and $1000 is worse than a new automatic transmission how?? I think a grand is a bargain in comparison.

      In the 3-4 weeks my fiancee and I spent on Craigslist looking up and down the east coast for a used car (had to be an autotragic- her preference), the #1 problem by far on cars in serious need of repair was the damn transmission.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        kvndoon, I think DC Bruce’s point is that at the $7000 price point only the most unreliable automatic transmissions are likely to require a rebuild for about $2000 while replacing the clutch is a relatively high-probability repair even if it costs less less than half as much. I would guess that people who went to the effort to find a car with a manual in the 21st century tend to drive their car rather hard.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    The things I’ve seen done to fleet pick up trucks leads me to believe that in basic form, they are borderline unkillable. The Ford and GM refridgerator white, hose out interior, stripper V6 trucks go forever and see all sorts of abuse. Even though I’ve driven a RAM as a personal work truck, I’ve never been impressed with their durability (outside the LA and Cummins engines).

    As to the OPs non-specific request, my typical answer has been the following:

    Find the best taken care of domestic/Japanese midsized sedan or full size sedan in your price range.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    2007 F-150/4.6. Can’t kill it. Designed for commercial grade abusers. Basically a Crown Vic with a bed. Clean examples everywhere, but look for the, not a scratch, Office Worker Edition. High miles, OK.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I have had many a fleet truck with the 4.2L V6 and 4.6L V8, and they have been unkillable.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      In his budget, it won’t be cheap or it won’t be nice.

      There would be two advantages to the Corolla (or other compact sedan):

      - Likely a more comfortable and quiet ride (not Lexus-like but you won’t have to max the stereo to hear it over freeway noise).
      - Less pain at the pump.

      Maybe cheaper to insure, too.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        His budget could score clean, avrg mi examples in the ’07 range. Just not Lariat 4X4 crew cabs, and such.

        losangeles.craigslist.org/lac/cto/4408761205.html

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        He said nothing about mpg requirements or very long commute.

        Trucks aren’t made for ride comfort, but neither are Corollas. One bucks and one’s choppy.

        But you might be surprised how insulated trucks are. I can’t even hear my F-550′s back-up beeper with the windows up. That thing will wake the dead.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          DenverMike: “He said nothing about mpg requirements or very long commute.”

          True. But he said, “$5000-8000.” That’s not an extravagant budget. If he drives 12K miles/year, he’s looking at an extra $1400/year to feed the F-150.

          Financially, I do OK but I still think $1400 is a chunk of change not to be sneezed at.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @KixStart – I think it’s unclear how great you think the Corolla’s mpg is and how bad you think the F-150′s is. I’m figuring around 200+ gallons a year difference. Or around 17 vs 25 mpg. Lots of variables though. But we don’t know how rich or poor he is, based on his 7-8K budget.

            I may cringe a bit when I fill-up my F-150, although my commute is shorter than most. But I’d rather do that than cringe every moment I’d be stuck in a Corolla. Especially, on the weekends with, loaded with friends, dogs, bikes, gear and whatnot.

            So we don’t know enough about him, to decide for him.

          • 0 avatar
            baggins

            Denver

            The difference between a 4.6l v8 ford truck and a 1.8L corolla in fuel usage is a little wider than 17mpg vs 25mpg. 17mg is about the best you can do with that truck and about the worst you can do in a corolla More realistic to assume the ford uses 2x the gas.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The question is, is worth it for him? It is for myself and millions out there. Say it’s $1,400. I’d give up Starbucks to not have to drive a Corolla. But the other thing is, I don’t have own 2 vehicles. But I know plenty that commute long distances, but can afford to do in 1/2 ton pickups. Life is too short, otherwise, if you ask them about trading down to a Corolla.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            Life’s short, make the right moves and don’t die poor.

            Fuelly says 30-32 for the Corolla and 14-17 for the F-150.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            You’re right, but you have to live a little, just for Today. Quality of life? Nah Brah, what for?

            Everyone has their thing. $120 or so a month extra to feed a 1/2 truck? Big F’ing deal… No?

            Cancel your smart phone while you’re at. Your internet also gone. Basic cable TV only. Sports channels? What? You want to die poor, or something???

            Hockey/football/baseball season tickets? Fishing? Camping? Hopefully it’s not cigarettes or something like that, in addition to.

            $50 sneakers? $48 Levis? Yikers! Haven’t you heard of Goodwill, my Good Man???

            Btw, you are on a car enthusiast’s site. Corollas are a tough sell around here. I don’t recommend, what I wouldn’t drive my self.

    • 0 avatar
      azmtbkr81

      Man I miss my ’05 F150 4.2 5-speed in pest control white. I paid $14k and change for it brand new – probably the best value I’ve ever had out of anything I’ve ever bought.

      One thing to keep in mind about pickups is that friends who you haven’t talked to for months seem to pop out of the woodwork every time they make a trip to Ikea or move out of their apartments.

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    How about cars that are sporty yet practical? An e36 or e46 can certainly fit the bill, ditto a first generation Lexus IS. Or even possibly a first generation Cadillac CTS.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      If someone is thinking about a first gen IS, they might as well get a Miata or pony car. The back seat and trunk are worthless so get a 2-door with a much better aftermarket.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “The back seat and trunk are worthless”

        You’ve described almost every sedan in that class.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Yeah. That’s true. That’s why if I wanted a cheap, sporty car, it would be 2-doors, or some sort of unloved domestic brand larger 4-door.

          I’d rather have a supercharged, late 90s-early 00s H-body/G-body than a Lexus IS of similar price though (The 16 year old kid across the street just got a Olds 88 with a supercharged 3800. I think its a cool first car).

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            One of these days, I’m going to get myself a 1999 Buick Riviera Silver Arrow. (I believe the supercharged “L67″ block became standard in the Riviera in ’98).

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “The 16 year old kid across the street just got a Olds 88 with a supercharged 3800.”

            There weren’t many supercharged Olds ever made and it always seems like they fall into the hands of 16YOs or people that don’t even know what they have.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It sure did Kyree. Beautiful cars.

            Ajla-

            A least the kid across the street really likes the car, takes car of it, and is a respectable teenager. He actually waves to me or says “Hi” when I’m outside. After showing me his car, he is also becoming aware of what he owns.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            What’s his address so I can come up and carjack him, way too nice of a car for 16yo. He should drive a clapped out J-car/Civic/Focus and like it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            If I give you the address you, make sure to stop by for a Founders Kentucky Breakfast Stout or other limited release before you jack his car. I never saw you…

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      CTS is a great choice. Get a reliable engine choice, and it’s a perfectly fine sedan with awful depreciation.

      Same reasons I like the Saturn Aura.

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      I have been shopping for a little while in the “sporty” and “sporty yet practical” categories in this $7-8k price range. The problem is most of the sporty cars in that price range have been abused, rusted, clapped out, modded, and ridden hard and put away wet. It is EXTREMELY difficult to find good examples of low priced sporty cars. With some of the abuse I have seen lately I think I have decided to bite the bullet and most likely go new for my second car needs.

      • 0 avatar

        > With some of the abuse I have seen lately I think I have decided to bite the bullet and most likely go new for my second car needs.

        For the value conscious sporty daily driver shopper, the 7-8k window is not very good, but neither is the initial depreciation hit.

        Off-lease is IMO the best deal if you can find a volume-based low-margin auction flipper who knows what to look for (sunshine state cars with low wear). We have one locally who only appends on ~1k for his troubles (he claims 500 but I have my doubts).

        This makes for bmws and such well below dealer CPO but superior quality to the cheap lots.

  • avatar
    matador

    Buy a premium brand. My logic:

    Let’s look at a vehicle that was produced basically the same for different manufacturers. We’ll use the Chevrolet Trailblazer and it’s relatives.

    The Chevrolet would be purchased likely by an average family with not a lot of extra money or would be financed. The GMC Envoy would be in the same situation. A kid owned a GMC Envoy when I was in High School. He did burnouts with it, and power-slid into a snowdrift. That SUV had depreciated to the point where a drug dealing High Schooler could get one.

    The Oldsmobile Bravada would be a little more upscale when new, but being an orphan, would likely depreciate downwards.

    The Buick Rainier would have been purchased new by someone with money… or good credit. It would be more likely to have its recommended servicing, and would probably be in better shape than the Chevrolet, GMC, or Oldsmobile.

    Buick’s have a habit of losing value over time, but a mid 2000′s Buick is a very nice car. It hasn’t depreciated to the value of my 1995 LeSabre yet. Get one with the 3800 and they’re virtually unkillable. Want something sensible? Regal or Century. Want big? LeSabre or Park Avenue? Want a fast, mid life crisis couch on wheels? Riviera.

    The biggest thing to a car is the owner. Who would you trust more? The owner of an Impala or Malibu, or the owner of a more expensive LeSabre/Park Avenue or even the plain Century?

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      Buicks are hardly ever bad choices. Especially used.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        This.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        I just bought an 03 Century for my mom ($3000), she’s on disability and can’t afford payments, and this is the first car she’s really liked in awhile apart from her Focus that was totaled by her ex-roommate. I did some cursory research around online and found that intake manifold is something to watch for, but otherwise the mechanicals are pretty simple and seem reliable enough.

        • 0 avatar
          Andrew717

          I just traded in an 02 Century. Was my wife’s grandmother’s car, I drove it for a year after she passed. Not my cup of tea styling-wise (beige-on-beige) but rock solid transportation. If it had the 3800 I may have kept it, but the 3.1 was fine.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That eighth-gen Riviera (’95-’99) is one of my favorite cars of all time, and for $7K, you could actually get one that still has all of its paint. GM was using very thin paint at that time, and the Riviera and Park Avenue are two obvious examples of that.

      Also, even a decent Lucerne will fit in the LW’s budget.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I’d vote Lucerne over the Riv. Those not beat to hell ones have too many “owner think awesome” dollars attached.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Like every purple or black 1996 Impala SS…

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          Most cars have that problem out here. A man is still trying to sell his 1995 Non-Supercharged Riviera for $6900. And it’s in average condition.

          It’s not only diesel Excursions out here. Pretty much any diesel truck out here is way overpriced.

          I’m looking at getting a rebuilt Riviera in the next couple of months. It’s a 1996 with the paint issues on the doors. But, a Riviera is one of the only cars from the mid 90′s that can make me drool in awe. Man, they’re great looking cars!

          Almost any Buick is a nice car, though. Give me a big Buick over a Corolla or Camry any day. I’d rather not feel like I’m sitting in a penalty box while driving.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I like the last small one too, the 91-93 looks especially nice without landau. I’ve never seen one with a broken CRT either, though I would prefer not having that option.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Both generations of Riv are attractive, and I believe the last E-body and MY95 G-body Rive share the Series I 3800. $6900 though is a bit much, I passed on a 47K one owner MY95 Supercharged for $4700, I doubt his is any better.

            @Corey

            I could see you in an E-body Riv. or Toro as a sunday car to complement your M37.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            As soon as I have more than one garage space, that’s what I’ll do.

            Mayhaps a Trofeo.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The diesel Excursion is the mythical beast that commands the highest prices in its segment. Its an SUV that you can get with a V10 or 7.3L diesel and 4WD.

            But yes, used diesel pickup pirces are sky high.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Pre-06 diesels will only get more expensive because of all the nonsense things they did on the newer ones.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Imagine a world… where the current Regal GS was powered by a 3800 Series V s/c mated to a six speed stick and AWD.

            I’m sad now that this world doesn’t exist.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            @CoreyDL—The facelifted seventh-gen Riviera did look pretty good (though the same is not necessarily true of the sawed-off and overpriced version that was the Reatta). I thought they all came standard with the digital instrument cluster, though.

            @28-Cars-Later–Indeed. The 1995 Riviera was a little different from the later ones. It had the older Series I 3800 engine, a different dashboard (that lacked the wood trim), and an older keyless-entry system. I’m not even sure it had OBD-II, since that wasn’t required until MY1996.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Kyree

            I don’t believe it did because OBDII wasn’t equipped on 3800 Series I AKAIK. We had several G-body Rivs through the lot back in day, I believe all MY95s (navy blue 112Kish , burgandy 95Kish, teal green 40Kish). I wish I had kept one of them, or if GM would bother making anything as appealing ever again (I won’t hold my breath).

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            Kyrie is slightly off on the 1995 Riviera. The 1995 models offered either the Series I Supercharged, or the Series II non Supercharged.

            AFAIK, there was never a Non-Supercharged Series I in a 1995 Riviera.

      • 0 avatar
        Yoss

        Doggone it guys, and here I thought I’d finally talked myself out of the idea of getting a last gen Riviera instead of something more practical.

    • 0 avatar
      darkwing

      Little-known fact: Buicks with Trifecta Tune actually appreciate.

    • 0 avatar
      mjg82

      Buick all the way.

      Last year my budget for a used car was exactly $7K and I picked an ’05 Buick Allure (Lacrosse), CXS with the 3.6, fully loaded and solid as a tank with 122,000km.

      It was well cared for by an older gent, and serves as perfect basic transportation, with some extra comfort features and a bit more go, of course.

      Incidentally it replaced my ’02 Regal with the good ol’ 3.8 that, based on the insurance slip I found in glove box, was nicely maintained by Martha, who also apparently owned a BMW Z4. Nice garage combo, IMO.

      Next up on my car purchase goals is a ’96 Roadmaster wagon, for summer use only.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        “Next up on my car purchase goals is a ’96 Roadmaster wagon, for summer use only.”

        Go for it. I believe those are starting to creep back up in price…

    • 0 avatar
      Hillman

      I get offers every other month to bu

    • 0 avatar
      Hillman

      I get offers every other month to buy my 94 h body Buick from random people on the street. Great car.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Lesabre?

        • 0 avatar
          Hillman

          Yes lesaber limited. Great car. 3800 series 1. Got 30 mpg on a trip that was all highway last year. My only problem is the dang thing won’t die.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            That’s a problem!? The transmission in mine (1995 LeSabre Custom) is finally going out- a little shy of 220k. Next month, it’s getting a new transmission.

            They’re great cars! My other car is a 2001 Audi A6. The Buick is way less refined, but it’s better for crusing. It’s like a couch with a 3800 attached.

          • 0 avatar
            Hillman

            I am joking about that being a problem. I want a newer car but I just can’t justify spending money on a newer car when the LeSaber works perfectly. You are right about it being a perfect highway cruiser. 4 guys with our bags and can drive in comfort while getting 28 + MPG on the highway. BTW how much was the transmission repair if you don’t mind me asking? I think that repair might be coming in about 4 years.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            I bought the transmission used from a place in Billings, Montana. It has a 1 Year/ 35000 mile warranty on it. The transmission itself was $250 (With a 90 Day warranty, it would have been only $100). They do test their transmissions, though, so you usually get a very good one (I had to wait awhile for one to pass their tests!)

            A local guy is installing it for $400. Add axle seals, Front Seal and ATF, and it’s probably a $750 job in total (About as much as I bought the car for)

            Much cheaper than option B- a 1996 Riviera for $1400.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        H/G/C body Buicks are some of the most reliable out there. I love scooping them up at auction on the cheap because of the uncool factor then selling them to people in the know.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I am thinking for the OP, the 08-09 Taurus/Sable is coming into attainability. Nice 3.5 reliable Ford engine, no CVT, and FWD/AWD, in a big BIG efficient, comfortable package (which nobody wants, esp in Mercury guise).

  • avatar
    KixStart

    “then find yourself a 2007 Toyota Corolla. Get a low mileage version with a 5-speed that was driven by a prior owner who knew how to handle a stick. 07′ was the last year of that particular generation and historically, vehicles that are later in their model runs tend to have fewer issues.”

    The ’08 was the same as the ’07. The ’09 is a newer version. A nice ’07-08 with average miles may be hard to find on this budget. But they are excellent automotive appliances and you do get a price break for a stick.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      The OP might consider a Yaris. Not much power but the 1.5L engine seems to be durable. Owners seem to love them, but I have not checked reliability reports. It’s not a popular car, so the price might be low.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        The Yaris is rock-reliable, even moreso than the Corolla. It’s also got somewhat better interior packaging and amazing fuel economy.

        Against it, it’s loud, the front seats are mounted too high and the penultimate version has the single cheapest piece of trim (that awful white plastic strip) I’ve ever seen.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave in Toronto

          Or consider the 2006 Scion xB, which is a Yaris van.

          I have 125000 miles on one and nothing has ever broken, it has original brake discs at the front still and the original exhaust.

          It does ride harder than it could, and it is noisier than it could be.

          These issues can be much improved for very little money – I did. But not required.

          And IMO it’s hard to find any other car with it’s particular attributes of being a small, reasonably fuel efficient Toyota “like they used to make”, but seats 4 adults / handles child seats with NO problems – that car is like the Tardis.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            How could have I forgotten my 05 xB? It was exceptionally reliable and cheap to operate.

            You’ve described the downsides well. I eventually tired of the noise and rough ride after 7 years and 70k miles, but it was an unbelievably well-built car – and with a cult following.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            I thought about mentioning the older xB but I thought they might be difficult to find and a bit expensive. However, I looked and Craigslist suggests they’re no worse than a Corolla.

            A great transportation appliance. And that’s not a curse, it’s a compliment.

        • 0 avatar
          baggins

          Yeah, the Yaris is a penalty box. If one can swing the funds for the corolla, its going to be a bit nicer of a ride.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Yeah, the Toyota premium comes into effect here. $7500 would get a good lower-mileage Yaris, or a similar-vintage Hyundai Elantra or Kia Optima.

  • avatar
    blackcayman

    similar question to the which used car is the most reliable

    “How long is a piece of string?”.

    …more info is needed to answer it

  • avatar
    ajla

    Lucerne 3.8l

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      *Gasp!*

      YOU!!

      Yeah… you…

      Prepare to feel the wrath of a hundred fingers being pointed at you! For you have not taken your drink out of The Big Cup of Toyota.

      Prepare to be shunned!

      For shame….

  • avatar
    slow_poke

    The most reliable car in the USA is a 4th gen Toyota pickup. Sure, not a car, but i had one for $3k and after 4 yrs, 45,000miles on it and i put only gas, oil, and tires. got 22mpg. total non gas-oil costs over that time was 2k. you want cheap. this is it. it was an automatic, FI version.

    not fast, not necessarily safe,

    • 0 avatar
      anti121hero

      I got much better results out of a 94 f150 with a straight six. 20 mpg and over 20000 miles per year, only gas, oil, spark plugs, and i bought it for 800$ :)

      • 0 avatar
        matador

        The 300 is an unkillable engine. I’d know. I use my 1995 Flareside to tow with.

        Really, any of the Small Block Ford or Chevrolet engines are great.I get 25 MPG with my 1987 Chevy 305. It has a “partial” exhaust system and it’s a No A/C truck, though ;-)

  • avatar

    A more clever approach to this category of money-predicated question is observe the OP is really more concerned about the overall ownership cost.

    In that case the trick is to find reasonably reliable cars that don’t depreciate much, so the s2000 makes a much better candidate than it would seem at first.

  • avatar
    gtrslngr

    A pre or post GM built Toyota Corolla

    Any RWD Lexus

    The Toyota Land Cruiser [ crusher ]

    The old RWD Toyota Avalon [ damn ... seems to be a theme going on here ]

    Any Toyota Tacoma as well as previous small Toyota P/U’s [ rwd or 4wd ]

    And … assuming you yourself are in decent enough shape .

    A Bicycle . Steel or Titanium framed . Any style . Guaranteed to never let you down [ beyond your capacity to repair it ] and the ONLY vehicle on the road that actually IS capable of attaining a comparable 900 mpg

    • 0 avatar
      greaseyknight

      No such thing as a RWD Toyota Avalon.

      Toyota Pickups are good vehicles, but are overpriced in the used market, go for a Ranger instead with a 2.3. Just as reliable, and much cheaper.

      • 0 avatar
        gtrslngr

        Oh yes there was . WAS being the key word here . The 1st generation Us bound Avalon in fact being a decontented RWD Lexus LS . Look it up before sticking thy foot into it

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          If it didn’t happen, then it’s not available. There never WAS an RWD Avalon sold in the US.

          The 1st generation Avalon was on the Camry platform. Are you really that ignorant and trollish that you’ll defend something on which you are completely wrong?

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            Yeah, both Wikipedia and Edmunds say the Avalon was always FWD in the US, and was originally a stretched Camry platform.

            Surprising Absolutely Nobody.

        • 0 avatar
          greaseyknight

          Um, who’s foot is in it now? I verified what I said before posting. You may be thinking of the Cressida, which is what the Avalon replaced.

          All things being equal the Toyota should be more reliable, if the frame does not rot out. In the real world things may be different in terms of supply and demand and condition.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Oh yes there was . WAS being the key word here . The 1st generation Us bound Avalon in fact being a decontented RWD Lexus LS . Look it up before sticking thy foot into it”

            “Um, who’s foot is in it now?”

            QOTD! I would be SO embarrassed, especially if I’d been acting like a real dick

      • 0 avatar
        gtrslngr

        … as to the Ranger . Not a bad choice mind you . But not nearly as dependable or reliable as the Toyotas . But yes . For less money [ and higher depreciation as well ] The Ranger is a fairly decent option to consider . But if you’ve got the extra dollars [ theres a reason they hold their value ]

        Toyota hands down

    • 0 avatar
      anti121hero

      So how much does toyota pay you per comment

    • 0 avatar
      daver277

      I put 32,500 km on my last aluminium bike with zero frame issues but Ti is very nice as it rides like steel w/out the weight.

      Bikes work on many levels – Fitness, parking, CO2, $, immunity to traffic congestion and last but not least for those of us with a desire for speed, you can go as fast as you want all the time.

      The more you ride, the more you will ride as fitness kicks in.

  • avatar
    7402

    7th generation (2002-2007) Honda Accord with the 4-cylider engine, automatic or five-speed manual to taste. Bias toward newer and lower mileage. Done.

  • avatar
    anti121hero

    Jeep cherokee 4.0 it’s an easy choice

    • 0 avatar
      gtrslngr

      A case of misery loving company perhaps ?

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      +1

      Without question.

      Just have to find one which was a grocery getter and parked in the garage in suburbia, not the one that was jacked up on 35′s and off-roaded for the past 5 years of its life.

      Look for the exterior shovel, winch, and the MOAB decals. That will be all the indicator you need :)

      • 0 avatar
        anti121hero

        Exactly this, as long as it wasn’t owned by a teenager, offroader, or hooligan, they will last years of either abuse or regular use. I have a friend witb over 360000 miles on his(with broken odomoter so mileage unknown), abused more than you could imagine, and runs like a top with no issues other than interior squeaks and rattles. these are extremely overbuilt, reliable, very practical and cheap to run. Only downfall is subpar fuel economy.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          They’re too hard to find in that condition with correct owner – and even if you do, not worth $7k at that age.

          • 0 avatar
            anti121hero

            The newer ones with a replaced head ate easily found for that much,which would be most desirable, as are the 97 – 99 which most grocery getters prefer due to the updated exterior and interior. My current one is a 93 that I got for 1500 with no rust, no issues, and bought with 142k, now at 150k, and my aforementioned friend got his for 300$ ages ago.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “Get a low mileage version with a 5-speed that was driven by a prior owner who knew how to handle a stick.”

    And then find a unicorn, since that seems about as likely.

    (AutoTrader shows five within 300 miles of Portland, where I live.

    The single low miler is $10k, and God only knows what the PO did to it.

    The only one in the $7-8k price range has 117kmi on it at a discount lot … and lots of luck with PO treatment, again.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    Get a Panther, be sure to set aside less than $500, probably $350 for the Addco sway bars. Avoid old cop cars, they are excessively harsh and usually need every wear item replaced before they drive good, and they still are loud because they have no carpet. Then again, for $8000 you could probably get a pretty mint one.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbob457

      Perfect advice. No cop cars unless completely refurbished. Try for 2003 or later model. Cop cars and air ride Lincoln Town cars don’t need the Addco sway bars – all others do (plus maybe some Bilstein shocks) or else they wallow. Be advised, mpg is not so hot – 14 to 17 in town and 20 to 24 on the road using regular gas. On the other hand, they are good for 200 to 300k miles. Second hand parts are cheap and available. Any decent indy mechanic can work on them.

      • 0 avatar
        Compaq Deskpro

        Might as well burn up the gas while its still affordable.

        Certain years have issues, 03 and later have exhaust manifolds that tend to rust in salty areas of the nation and cause leaks (all mod motor Fords do), 99-03 have premature timing chain tentioner wear, a run of 03′s have premature axle wear, and all mod motors have a taste for ignition coils when the miles get high. Generally, avoid 03′s. 04′s are the best, 05 and later are all good. Locking rear ends are a pain in the ass, avoid.

        This is a do as a say not as I do kind of thing, as I bought the hammered old cop car that happens to be an 03 with all of those issues, and I love it.

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    For an all-around compromise vehicle (not with the Toyota reputation or markup, not as much fun but not asimpractical as a Miata, not a boonie-basher but not as likely to be hooned as a Cherokee or similar), Consumer Reports likes the 2006-9 Ford Fusion and Mercury Milan.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Any car owned by Norm

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    We have the best luck selling used Buicks. Those almost always seem to be taken care of the best, there interiors are clean and not usually worn, they run out good and still feel tight. Of particular note the LeSabre’s from 2002-2005 are reliable, the Lucerne with the series III 3800 is bullet proof save for the first model year in 2006 when they suffered a few interior issues and the 2003-2005 Century’s and Regals are generally good too. The 2006-2009 LaCrosse also uses the Series III motor and are pretty good cars overall though I would avoid the 3.6 Global V6 at all costs as we have seen several examples that need timing chain replacement which involves taking the motor out and is a big money repair.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      When I sold my A8L to an older couple, the wife said “Oh we thought it was a Buick so we stopped to look at it!” I had to grit my teeth hardcore, but I managed not to say anything. I wanted to go on a rant.

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      The Buick’s with the 3800 are unkillable. I’ve only owned the Series I in a LeSabre, but an uncle owned a Series II in an Impala. With nearly NO maintenance, the car still runs at 220k. If he can’t kill an engine, it’s great!

  • avatar
    wmba

    I still believe the methodology used by Mr. Lang is flawed. Basing old car reliability on what goes through auctions, believing it to be a true subset of cars sold without proof that the samples are related to original sales volume by make and model, is no better than asking Joe down the street what he thinks.

    I said the same here on TTAC a couple of years ago. A statistician with some experience needs to be consulted to see if the correlation is valid before proclaiming results. As it stands, I have no faith in the “results”.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbob457

      I would be a statistician ‘with some experience’. It is rare in the real world that one can draw a classic random sample. In Lang’s case it is easier to work backwards and ask the question: “what is the universe from which his sample is being drawn?” In this case it looks like the answer is: “those vehicles currently being offered for sale as used cars”. Mercy sakes alive, is not this just exactly the universe we as consumers want info about!

      Personally, I would like his analysis to be expanded to in some way include model years or possibly just generational info. Given access to some data, I might even do the work myself.

      It might shed some light on just exactly where to focus. For example, Porsche 996′s are designed and built like the proverbial brick outhouse, but a bean-counter inspired el cheapo IMS bearing grenades the engine in about 10% of examples built between certain dates. Similarly, the usually super reliable Acura TL has a bean-counter inspired flaw in its transmission design for certain model years. It would be nice to have an analysis that might sometimes pinpoint these sort of flaws.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        I wouldn’t assume that the cars at dealer’s auctions are a fair representation of the overall pool.

        I would presume that many of the better cars will have been taken in trade at new car dealers, sold privately or simply kept by their owners and not sold at all.

        In contrast, the cars that end up in auctions are those that the dealers had to dump at wholesale. Some of those reasons are probably tied to negative factors about the car.

        I’m only guessing here, and it’s possible that the auctions are representative of the norm. But I doubt it.

        • 0 avatar
          jimbob457

          I see your point. The pool of cars actually for sale has been creamed by retail dealers taking trade-ins and turning them at retail in their own used car lots. Still, fleet and lease cars are usually auctioned. Older cars are more often wholesaled. Certain models are more often wholesaled. I guess knowing these details and the extent of any bias is what knowing the business is all about.

  • avatar
    George B

    If I needed a reliable car at minimum cost, I’d look for a well maintained conservative sedan built from good ingredients like a Buick with the 3800 V6. Unlikely to have been abused, great engine and transmission, and low insurance cost. The supposed economy cars are much more likely to have been abused and/or neglected by younger drivers and relatively high insurance costs negate savings at the gas pump.

    Another factor in the total cost of ownership is the resale value when you sell it. For resale, it’s hard to beat a pickup truck. Buyers are a lot more willing to overlook oxidized paint and and dents in a work truck than they would for sedan and even major repairs don’t automatically send a pickup to the crusher. Engine and transmission swaps are much less labor intensive for a pickup than for a FWD car.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    It’s hard to believe a Z4 is considered a reliable car. I cannot find anything that supports such claim.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      And what are you finding that disagrees with that claim? Aside from 2003 drainage issues shorting out the power top motor, and notchy steering on the pre-LCI cars in warm weather, they’re the most reliable modern BMW. Fantastic cars and I’m a moron for selling my 2007 3.0si Coupe.

  • avatar
    That guy

    You could find a seriously mint 2004-2008 Pontiac Grand Prix with the bullet proof 3800 V6 and have money left over.

  • avatar
    canddmeyer

    The most reliable? A Toyota _____ (fill in the blank).

  • avatar
    Hemi

    Just get a used Corolla/Camry/Civic/Accord that has service records, was maintained and in good shape. Have it inspected by a mechanic to avoid any issues.

  • avatar
    turvo

    Take your time and find a 95-03 nissan maxima with a decent service history. Bought a 95 back in 98, traded it for a pathfinder, than bought a 98 for my wife back in 02. Kept it till 09 with nothing but regular maintenance and the occasional electrical fault, radio and the like. Sold it to an employee of mine who still has it with 250k on it.
    My youngest son just bought a 98 with my help with 132k, full service history, no rust and runs down the road every bit as well as our 13 Kia Optima for $3200. I actually prefer driving it over the Optima. My sister has owned a 95 and an 03 as did my Mom. Nary a problem with either. Bullet proof cars all around.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I’ve been trying to figure this one out myself – as my older Hyundai gets more and more finicky, my wife is starting to come around to the idea that maybe it’s finally time to get rid of it (easy for me to say, I spend all day in it). I’d be looking to spend $5-6k (so as to pay cash), for something slightly lower mileage than the 100k miles Hyundai, 4 doors (in case a kid comes along in the next couple years), A/C, stick, small enough to fit in a parking spot with a motorcycle (so, no Buicks, as if the stick didn’t rule that out), and reasonably well protected against rust. I mean, a Mazda3 would theoretically work, but good luck finding one that isn’t starting to bubble, if the rear arches aren’t completely gone. Toyotas and Honda are also problematic – they carry a fairly steep premium in the Toronto area (the odd Matrix pops up, which is about the only Toyota I’d consider anyhow).

    I’m torn if a 2.0 MkIV Golf is a safe enough bet. They seem to be among the better rust-proofed compacts in my budget, plentiful, and the powertrain is old enough to drink, so it’s theoretically proven. And I don’t mind the odd DIY job, as long as it’s not a problem that’ll strand me, and doesn’t require me to spend 7 hours fighting with WD40 and a breaker bar. Other than that, Saturn Astras could be worthwhile (if I could find one), and I’m iffy on Nissan Versas (if Nissan can’t get rustproofing right on the Maxima, what chance does their cheapest car stand?).

  • avatar
    redav

    “The manufacturer that offers the best match for your automotive tastes will impact your reliability because, you will likely be willing to invest in the best parts if that car offers what you consider to be the optimal driving experience.”

    In other words: the most reliable car will be the one that you maintain. Take care of it, and it will take care of you.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Not always. Some cars (typically European ones, like my Jetta) do have inherent design flaws that rear their ugly heads and put a wrench in things. But a lot of people end up with issues because they couldn’t even be bothered to crack open their maintenance manuals/schedules and see what kind of care the car required…

  • avatar
    Pebble

    The answer is a used Town Car or Grand Marquis. Buy it and drive it forever. Rock solid.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India