By on May 20, 2013

roadster24

Zolland Design AB, a Swedish graphic arts and design firm that also goes by the name Vizualtech, has rendered an Indy Roadster style body they call the IndySeven with the correct dimensions to fit on a Caterham or Lotus Seven chassis. From a design standpoint it works, but then I’m fond of Frank Kurtis’ Indy Roadsters. Kurtis was one of the most prolific race car builders ever, with 120 Kurtis-Kraft cars having competed at Indy, including five race winners. From a conceptual standpoint I like it even more because it puts a clever twist on the history of the Indianapolis 500. It was Lotus, starting in 1963 and culminating with Jim Clark’s win in his mid-engine Ford powered #82 Lotus 38, that changed Indy forever, sounding the death knell for the traditional front engine roadsters. The Indy roadsters’ proportions work because the Lotus Seven has it’s powerplant up front. It was introduced in 1957, three years before Lotus’ first mid-engine racer and a full decade before the Europa, Colin Chapman’s first mid-engine road car.

roadster17

The renderings look great. They take one of the original wind in your hair sports cars and make it look like it would be even more fun. The original Seven has an immediately recognizable shape, but you’d never know a Seven was under these designs.

A real Indy Roadster, made by Frank Kurtis

A real Indy Roadster, made by Frank Kurtis

Between the Sevens made by Lotus, those made by Caterham, and particularly the popular Locost/Se7en DIY replicas, if someone were to take Zolland Design’s rendering and start selling those bodies, they just might have a ready market.

roadster26

Ronnie Schreiber edits Cars In Depth, a realistic perspective on cars & car culture and the original 3D car site. If you found this post worthwhile, you can dig deeper at Cars In Depth. If the 3D thing freaks you out, don’t worry, all the photo and video players in use at the site have mono options. Thanks for reading – RJS

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

18 Comments on “What’s Right With This Picture? Indy Roadster Se7en by Zolland Design...”


  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    The beauty of the 7 is that it is street legal. This is not. Love the concept, could be expanded to lots of sports racing bodies of the period but keep the car street legal.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Sort of crazy what passes for “street legal” in Europe. They have to be, to run the nurburgring.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Why isn’t it street legal? Plenty of fenderless and windshieldless “hotrods” running around. Maine even has “hotrod” license plates for them. Guess it depends on where you live. Base it on a 25yo donor car and it would not even need to be inspected here.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        I don’t know about Maine, but we’re talking about ‘new cars’. What airbags? What crash testing?

        If you’re talking about registering kit car T-buckets or roadsters, it can be a lengthy process and varies from state to state. California limits it 500 yearly applications. Then you go to a smog referee.

        • 0 avatar
          jdmcomp

          Sorry, I should have been more pointed. I mean street legal for a kit car as that is what this is, another body for the lotus 7 and 7 copies. Still a kit car and only has to conform to those rules, not new car rules.

          As for what passes as legal and what the law actually requires, I find that the requirements are not often followed. Most states give out antique car plates but if you read the requirements (at least here in TN) the car must be all original so street rods do not qualify and yet most street rods in TN have antique plates. Just because you see cars with no fenders does not mean they are not required.

  • avatar
    racer193

    If it where legal to run any car fenderless here I would be looking for a low cost kit and all the donar bits right now. That body.is just sexy as hell but the fender laws here would really kill the look. Oh well

  • avatar
    Autopassion

    Wonderful, classic design language, although it might work better on a slightly larger platform than a Lotus 7, and while you’re at it, incorporate actual torsion bar suspension. I really wish the hot rod crowd would take a long look at this, as opposed to building yet another ’27, ’28, ’29, ’30, ’31, ’32, etc., etc. They’re all great – that’s why there are so many of them – but I’ve seen more than enough.

    Same with the kit car company offerings. Speedsters, Cobras and so on. Love them, but about a change? This, or maybe something like Old Yeller II http://oldyeller2.com/

    • 0 avatar
      Bunter1

      Agreed. It is a circular pattern-all building the same car in different color schemes. This goes triple for chopper builders-I think of them, and their customers, as “conformist rebels”. That includes many (not all)Harley riders also. Chuckle.

      Love and bullets.

      Bunter

  • avatar
    Dan R

    What’s that thing sticking out of the LH side?

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    They could probably come up with some fenders ala Plymouth Prowler for those locations that require them, without ruining the lines. If these were sold where emissions equipment were required, wouldn’t a cat mounted at that height roast your face?

  • avatar
    Bunter1

    I think a tight set of black cycle style fenders would tend to “disappear” visually.
    Love it. The Kurtis roadster is perfect for this and I think it does credit to both the original and the donor chassis.

    Freakin’ cool-why did we need to wait for the Swedes to do this?

    Cheerio,
    Bunter

  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    Indy Roadster Se7en by Zolland Design

    What’s in the trunk..

    WHAT’S IN THE TRUNK!!!!

  • avatar
    raph

    I’d rock it! Well with a Hartley V8

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    This is pretty slick. For a while, I’ve been thinking about designing my own “Locost” vehicle–as these Lotus 7 clones are apparently called.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States