By on November 9, 2011

Thirteen years after the Mercedes-Benz SLK reintroduced the hard top convertible, the novelty has once again begun to wear off in the face of concerns about cost, complexity, and curb weight. Even high-end manufacturers like Audi, BMW, and Jaguar have fit their latest convertibles with soft tops (albeit multi-layered ones to retain heat and keep out noise). In other words, the retractable hard top has not rendered ye olde ragtop obsolete. This isn’t to say that the retractable hard top is pointless, at least not when innovatively executed. The recently updated Volkswagen Eos remains the best. But would you want one?

The Eos’s exterior styling remains consistent with the VW brand. Meaning it’s much more clean and functional than drop-dead gorgeous. The revised, de-chromed nose is more generic, but an improvement nonetheless. The top’s novel configuration avoids the poorly located side rail seams that mar the appearance of the otherwise more stylish Volvo C70. Inside, the Eos is similarly very VW, with an instrument panel similar to other compact Euro-market VWs. So clean and solidly-constructed, but nothing flashy or notably luxurious.

As in a number of other VWs and Audis, the driver’s seat is firm and supportive, but is not especially comfortable despite the inclusion of a four-way power lumbar adjustment. You’ll find a far better seat in a Volvo. Visibility is pretty good in all directions. The rear seat is just roomy enough for the average adult male to side behind another such male. If either person is six-plus-feet-tall, though, the fit is going to be tight.

The top is truly the big story. If you’re not interested in it, then you’re not interested in the Eos. VW’s key innovation: separating the center panel from the side rails. This enables a number of unique advantages:

  1. A superior exterior appearance when the top is up, as noted above. The separated side rails can stow to each side of the rear seat, so they can be longer than a one-piece center panel could be.
  2. An extra-wide rail-to-rail fully functional glass sunroof within the retractable hard top. So you can get some light in the car even with the roof up. Or, to get a little air in the car without fully opening the roof, vent or open the sunroof.
  3. A compact retracted roof, in sharp contrast to the much simpler roof of the late, unlamented Pontiac G6 hard top convertible. Even with the top down there’s enough room in the trunk for my usual weekly grocery run. With the top up, trunk space expands from 6.6 to 10.5 cubic feet. And there’s a pass-through to the rear seat for long objects in either configuration.

You simply cannot buy any other car with a roof this versatile. VW even includes a standard wind blocker that covers the rear seat to enable comfortable top-down driving on cool days, and that easily fits in the trunk when not in use.

Of course, the roof also has downsides. The first: with so many motorized pieces, it’s extremely complex. While my sons were highly entertained by the top’s “transformer” effect when in transition, the reliability survey conductor in me must wonder how durable this mechanism will be, and how much it would cost to fix if it did break. Even with the nearly new tested car the top proved finicky. On cold mornings it visibly shook and audibly creaked while traversing patchy pavement. (To keep the seals supple, regularly apply Krytox GPL lube, which runs $50 for two ounces.) Get the trunk’s cargo separator just a bit out of place, and the top won’t go down. Other times the windows wouldn’t move up or down in response to my initial request. And once the windows started rapidly going up and down a fraction of an inch, as they do whenever a front door is opened.

The second downside: curb weight. Tipping the scales just north of 3,500 pounds, the Eos is over 400 pounds heavier than a GTI. So VW’s ubiquitous 200-horsepower 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine feels a bit soft off the line and more laggy at middling speeds. Unlike some these days, you can tell it’s a turbo. Once boost is up, though, the 2.0T moves the Eos forward more than well enough given the car’s typical cruising mission. You don’t have to rev the engine, given its plump midrange. If you want to do so anyway, the mandatory ultra-quick-shifting DSG dual-clutch automated manual transmission is eager to assist. Manual mode works via the lever; there are no shift paddles.

The extra curb weight appears to have cut two-to-three MPG from the Eos’s rated fuel economy, 22/30 vs. 24/33 for the GTI. In suburban driving the trip computer reported from 23 to 26, depending on my driving style. Not bad numbers for a four-seat turbocharged convertible.

In casual driving the Eos feels taut, sporty, almost agile, and much more enjoyable than a Chrysler 200 (the only other hard top four-seat convertible with a price in the mid-thirties). The VW’s steering provides little feedback, but it’s quick and nicely weighted. Drive the Eos as you might a GTI, though, and it lapses into a clumsy plow as its higher center of gravity (especially with the top up) and extra pounds overwhelm the capabilities of the suspension and 235/45HR17 Goodyear Eagle LS tires. The tires do contribute to a generally smooth, quiet ride.

The final downside of the complicated top: price. At $34,765 in its base trim with no options, the Eos lists for $6,950 more than a GTI with DSG and the Sunroof and Convenience Package. Aside from the retractable hard top, the feature level is very similar (according to TrueDelta’s Car Price Comparison Tool), so you’re paying about seven large for the top (in addition to the cost of a sunroof, which is included in the GTI as configured). Not that you’ll do better elsewhere. A Chrysler 200 Limited hard top convertible costs about the same, while a Volvo C70 lists for $6,000 more.

The Volkwagen Eos doesn’t handle like a sports car, or even like a hot hatch. Its styling doesn’t suggest otherwise. But some people are merely seeking a solid, sensible, livable car with a versatile roof that lets them enjoy the sun and fresh air to the maximum extent the weather permits. For this mission, the Eos serves best.

Volkswagen provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review.

Michael Karesh operates TrueDelta, an online source of automotive pricing and reliability data.

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73 Comments on “Review: 2012 Volkswagen Eos...”


  • avatar
    smink123

    would love to see a picture with the top completely up…

  • avatar
    th003g

    It wasn’t the SLK that reintroduced the hardtop convertible, it was the Mitsubishi 3000GT Spyder.

    • 0 avatar

      If a tree falls in the forest, and no one is there to hear it…

      The 3000GT was too expensive and from too marginal a player to have an impact. The SLK inspired the current abundance of offerings.

      • 0 avatar
        th003g

        A fact is a fact….
        if a tree falls, a tree falls…
        To this day the cars have a cult following.

        Yes, a $20k premium over the coupe is expensive, but then again the original SLK was based on the cheaper C class platform and priced at a premium. Charging so much for a convertible version of a Japanese GT car (Already a niche market) basically priced it outside most budgets except for hardcore enthusiasts of the brand.

        SLK was a move downmarket, people saw this car as a way to get into a MB coupe/convertible which used to be territory of the expensive SL at a bargain price. Moving downmarket is much easier than a move upmarket.

        Put the same platform in a Chrysler and it also will bomb (Crossfire). Mercedes just had the marketing, budget, and customer base to make the concept a sales success.

        Your statement ” Thirteen years after the Mercedes-Benz SLK reintroduced the hard top convertible” is very different than “The SLK inspired the current abundance of offerings.”

        Point being give credit where credit is due, Mitsubishi was able to come to market with an idea not seen on the market in 30 years and charge a premium for it. Thus you could also say it inspired the later offerings because it showed it was possible to charge a crazy amount of money for some newfangled tech.

        Your statement ” Thirteen years after the Mercedes-Benz SLK reintroduced the hard top convertible” is very different than your modified rebuttal of “The SLK inspired the current abundance of offerings.”

        I guess we can agree to disagree….

      • 0 avatar

        Only 1618 3000GT Spyders were produced. Not a number that invites copycats.

        ASC was actually responsible for the concept, and initially pitched it to Nissan:

        http://www.3000gtspyderregistry.com/300zx/index.html

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        “Only 1618 3000GT Spyders were produced.”

        Even fewer Veyrons are produced. A car’s significance is not always proportional to units sold.

      • 0 avatar

        The Veyron is significant?

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      +1 Was totally going to mention the ’96 Mitsu Spyder. First all folding hardtop convertible since the ’57 Ford Fairlane.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    This is the car for spinster librarians with nice pensions who need to trade in their lavender New Beetles.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Which, you know, totally describes me.

      Except for the part about being a female, a librarian, a spinster, and having a pension. But other than that I’m all over this, and lavender Beetles.

      • 0 avatar

        Canadians love convertibles despite their short summers. Or maybe because they have such short summers? The Eos, with its sunroof, makes even more sense north of the border than it does way down here in balmy Michigan.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        Canadians love convertibles despite their short summers

        Summer has nothing to do with it. I’ve taken my father’s Mustang out in January.

        In Algonquin Park.

        If it’s not actively raining, snowing or misty to the point of dampness, the top goes down.

      • 0 avatar
        Japanese Buick

        I’ve noticed that the shorter the summer, the more people work to squeeze every bit of enjoyment from it possible. Compare the number of backyard pools in someplace like New York or Wisconsin with a southern state like NC, for example.

      • 0 avatar
        TCragg

        My wife and I don’t fall into any of the above categories, except being Canadian and enjoying driving convertibles in any kind of weather. We were the owners of two Cabrios (2001 and 2002), and an ’09 Eos. We found the Eos to be better in every respect over the soft-tops. We did not have any issue with the fuel economy on the Eos. After living with the dismal performance and fuel economy of the 2.slow in the Cabrios, the 2.0T in the Eos was exhilarating. We easily saw 700+ kms out of a 55L tank in highway driving. We had 50,000 km on our Eos when we traded it on a 2010 Passat wagon demo. We parted with the Eos reluctantly when our son came along earlier this year. Fitting a rear-facing car seat in the back of the Eos was possible, but it required the front passenger seat to be moved so far forward as to render it inhabitable by only the smallest humans. I will definitely pick up another Eos as a used third car in a few years, once the used values come downn a bit.

      • 0 avatar
        Japanese Buick

        @TCragg, so in other words the secret to satisfying Eos ownership experience is to get rid of it after 31,000 miles?

      • 0 avatar
        TCragg

        Japanese Buick: I’m not suggesting that at all. Our Eos was completely trouble-free over two years (and through two Canadian winters). The car gave me no reason to believe that long-term ownership would be any more painful than any other hardtop convertible. We never had any issues with the top, or any electical glitches. The only visits I had to the dealer were for scheduled maintenance. Of course, 50,000 km doesn’t tell you much about long-term issues, but from an initial quality perspective, the Eos was above average. I would still have the car today were it not for the baby. My wife gave up her Eos, and I gave up my BMW R1150RT. The things you sacrifice for your kids…

  • avatar

    I’d like to have some solid reliability stats for the Eos. But we’re only close for the 2007, and even for that year we’re two cars short of the minimum for an “official result.” So the not-quite-worse-than-average score of 89 repair trips per 100 cars per year (very similar to the scores for the Rabbit and GTI) has an asterisk next to it.

    To help with the Car Reliability Survey, with an Eos or just about any other car:

    http://www.truedelta.com/reliability.php

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    I am a huge fan of the hard-top convertible. I really don’t like soft tops, they leak and make it easy to steal the car.

    • 0 avatar

      I’d actually expect more leaks with a hard top convertible. Far more seams.

      • 0 avatar
        th003g

        Actually if you google EOS roof leaks… its a major issue with this car

      • 0 avatar
        TCragg

        Michael, the Cabrios leaked like sieves. The Eos was tight and leak-free. I would never dare to take the Cabrios through an automatic, “touchless” wash, but it was no problem with the Eos. The seals, as you mentioned, did have to be lubed at regular intervals to maintain the leak-free condition.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        “The Cabrio leaked like sieves.”

        B.S.

        If I take our ’97 to the car wash and spray a wand at the tops of the windows it will leak – little rivulets rolling down the inside of the side glass. Driving in the rain or parked in the rain the car is dry as can be and our Cabrio sits outside all year ’round.

      • 0 avatar
        TCragg

        Perhaps I should clarify. I could not take either of the Cabrios to an automatic or coin-op car wash (anything with high-pressure) without water streaming down the insides of the windows. I could only hand-wash the cars. The Eos, on the other hand, was regularly taken through a touchless high-pressure wash and did not leak. As you mentioned with your ’97, leaks in the rain were not an issue most of the time. Our ’02, however would leak on the passenger side in a particularly heavy rain.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        Okay – now you are making sense. I also would never take a soft top car through a car wash either. I take mine a few times a winter to wash off the salt on the bottom. I keep the wand off the top and care for that by hand at home.

        That said I recently followed a soft top Sebring through an automatic wash – the kind that scrub a car all over. Would never do that to a new car but considering my ‘V is now 12 years old and the paint is not perfect, I don’t worry about it at all for occasional use. The Sebring came through with a roof but I’d never try that myself.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        I leaped to the conclusion that you were lumping the Cabrio in with the MGs and Austin-Healeys (we had a 3000) and those – those cars leaked…

      • 0 avatar
        Japanese Buick

        @th003g — I’m all for cracking on VW reliability, but in fairness I’m not sure that googling for a specific problem and finding hits is a fair way to assess quality.

        I have an LS400 (thus my handle) and their transmissions are known to be extremely durable, but if I google on LS400 transmission failure, sure enough I find hits.

        People don’t post “my transmission is still fine!” any more than they would post “my EOS still doesn’t leak” which is why I don’t think googling for a specific problem gives you any idea how widespread it really is.

  • avatar

    I looked at this a few years ago and I liked it. It’s too bad you can’t get it with the stick anymore. I ended up with a Miata instead… soft top.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    My wife and I love these, but doubt if we would ever buy one – the complexity of the top scares me to death – just give me a good rag top and I’m fine – or – simplify the doggone thing! Rube Goldberg need not apply.

    Still, a pretty car, but our MX5 takes care of our “fun” quotient.

    • 0 avatar
      Japanese Buick

      I hear ya, Zackman. I would already have one of these if the combination of “Volkswagen” and “complex intricate top mechanism” hadn’t scared me away.

      I have a Miata that would have been replaced with this. As my wife and I get older the Miata seems to get smaller and less comfortable. She won’t even get in the Miata any more, but she can easily get in and out of an EOS.

  • avatar
    SMIA1948

    I have a 2007 Eos with the manual transmission and I love it. The only real problem is that when people see a guy driving one of these, they assume that he’s gay.

  • avatar
    imag

    It seems like a pretty good rental on a tropical vacation if a Mustang isn’t available.

    I want to know where these turbo cars are that have unnoticeable lag. Even the much-vaunted 335i feels squishy to me as the turbo spools up. It’s not like ye olde 80′s, but it sure doesn’t fool me that it’s real displacement.

  • avatar
    swedishiron

    The Volvo C70 is worth everyone penny of its $6K higher price, better styling. more power and greater reliability and probably safer especially in a rollover. Plus Volvo has an optional Polestar performance tune that does not mitigate the factory warranty nor reduce EPA mileage.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Not having spent much time in hard top convertibles, I can’t speak to all of them.
    However, I was given an evening in one that belonged to a work-mate last fall to and from the LA auto show.
    I was shocked!
    I didn’t have the heart o tell him I was getting nuts listening to the sounds of an old wooden boat creaking in the waves!
    Those creeks and cracking that were coming from the top on the downtown LA streets were uts!
    What was causing these? Were they supposed to be greased or something?
    This car cost 62 pus grand!
    Now IF I were to EVER pay 60 grand for a car, I sure as hell would not be happy with noises from simple street dives pounding in my head.
    This was a stupid buy.
    Sounds like the car suffers from the same noises.

  • avatar
    FleetofWheel

    These cars will make for an interesting Piston Slap column 10 years from now.

    People will be asking Sajeev the sagacity of daring to put the top down on an aged model with retraction mechanism gremlins.

  • avatar
    Marko

    Well, at least there’s no “basket handle” that brings to mind certain nicknames…

  • avatar

    “In casual driving the Eos feels taut, sporty, almost agile, and much more enjoyable than a Chrysler 200 (the only other hard top four-seat convertible with a price in the mid-thirties).”

    Doesn’t the Mustang V6 convertible also fit in the 4-seat convertibles category? I haven’t done a feature for feature comparison, but according to Ford’s site, it starts at $27,310 for the base V6 convertible, and $31,310 for the V6 premium convertible. That leaves plenty of cash to load up on options. I’d personally choose the Mustang over the Eos, but I can see why some people would prefer Eos’s quieter design over the loud and retro-riffic Mustang design.

    • 0 avatar

      The Mustang convertible isn’t a hard top.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        True. But in ’95, Ford offered a removable hardtop convertible (with a soft-top as well) as a $1500 option. I’ve owned my ’95 Cobra Hardtop Convertible for nearly 8 years now and have found the hardtop to be totally sweetas and a real pain in the ass.

        PROS:
        - Much more secure than soft-top. Can actually lock the car downtown and not worry about knife welding meth heads ripping the top to steal the stereo.
        - Styling. The soft-top when its up gives a bit of a baby-buggy look, not the best for a muscle car. The hard top gives it a very unique finished look.
        - Rarity. Wins car shows in its class. Always get the small crowd who never heard of it before.
        - Cold weather/Sound insulation. The hard top is better.
        CONS
        - Initial cost must have been a bitch.
        - Weight. All fiberglass but the rear window is huge. 80 lbs extra though is not too bad. Two person, awkward lift to place on the stand.
        - Storage. Comes with a really cheap wheeled stand that takes up a ton of space in the garage.
        - Sound. Yeah, it does tend to sound like a boat creaking on the water on unsettled pavement. Nothing to do about it.

        At the annual Shelbyfest two years back, I had the opportunity to ask the SVT engineers if they felt they would bring back the hardtop convertible with a resounding NO. Reason: Cost.

    • 0 avatar
      Advo

      It doesn’t matter if a convertible has four seats if passengers in the back can’t fit or are very uncomfortable due to wind or wind noise.

      I’m comfortable in the back of a Mustang behind a driver of my size (6′), but I can’t fit my knees in so they stick out a bit at the sides of the front seat. Actually, for some reason, the Mustang’s back seat fits me well, and I really like it.

      The problem is that from what I’ve read on the internet, the wind buffeting and noise is really bad back there in a Mustang. If I had a convertible and were, say, showing Vancouver to friends or relatives from out-of-town, I’d want an Eos for the extra room and wind deflector on the front windshield. For two people, a Mustang would be great.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    My ex-GF is going to be foaming at the mouth for this thing. I can just see the future emails now:

    Well, the damn top on my car screwed up again..

    The pic of the top mechanism is enough to keep any sane person away, but I bet she will have one within the first 6 months it’s out.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I believe VW makes the best-looking convertibles, and this car is no different.

    But I’d never buy it – too much money, too complex. If it’s electrical and VW, it’s better to stay away.

  • avatar

    Lexus IS250C

    I’m just going to leave that right there…

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Owning one of these out of warranty is a bit like Russian roulette, with a bullet in every chamber. Anyone considering long term ownership should buy a used SC430 instead. There’s no room in back, but at least the thing will work right.

  • avatar
    Full-Throttle

    C’mon TTAC’ers, you guys agree there is anything sporty ever built by VW, what crap do you guys drive really? My DD is a BMW 130i, I once gave the Golf GTI a test-drive, it was a disaster compared to the Werke, you could even tell from the steering feel alone.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Well, you are comparing a rwd vs. fwd, of course you were not impressed. Plus, the GTI really needs a sway bar upgrade to tight things up, and your DD is a bit more expensive as well. Compared to other fwd “hot hatches”, the GTI is very good, very sporty, and very fun. Also, the Eos isnt meant to be sporty, its just a cute beach cruiser, the replacement for the old Cabrio.

    • 0 avatar
      mpresley

      As far as girl’s cars go, the EOS is probably as good as the Bimmer One Series. Obviously a man looking for a sporty sedan will opt for the 3 series, preferably an M, and from VW the Golf R. In a pinch the 130 M could do.

  • avatar
    Eurylokhos

    These cars are terrifying. I’ve made the mistake of buying 2 VWs, one ended up a lemon buy back and the other got traded in with serious electrical gremlins (sunroof and windows randomly operating) after a 12k DSG replacement at 8k miles. VW makes a great chassis and engine with beautiful styling and then uses the worst quality electronics possible. That roof is going to fail in a spectacular fashion, and knowing VW it’ll do great things like randomly going down uncommanded while driving at speed, or will refuse to go up once down.

    My mother bought a 2010, it’s a nicely finished car like all VWs, but naturally has gremlins. When visiting her we’ve gone out in it a few times and out of the 4 times she’s tried to put the roof down while I’ve been there it’s successfully happened once. The dealer tracked it down to the sensor for the divider in the trunk. Not a good start on a car that had 3k on it at the time. I hope that car is willed to my sister, it scares the crap out of me.

  • avatar
    windswords

    This is the only VW I would consider buying (with a factory warranty of course).

  • avatar
    energetik9

    The mechanical part of me is interested in the top, but at the end of the day, it’s still a boring looking VW.

    Even my wife who wanted a convertible refused to look at this. Her choice in the end, BMW 128 vert.

  • avatar
    brettc

    My brother owned a white Eos (2009 model I think) for a brief period of time. He owned it while it was still under warranty but ended up trading for a Routan because a convertible isn’t really a practical family car. Watching the roof go up and down was entertaining. But as others have said, you’d be insane to own one of these outside of the warranty period.

    That is unless you enjoy pulling your hair out trying to chase down the reason that your roof is permanently up or down…

  • avatar
    John R

    $35k for a Golf convertible?? yeeesh. Guess I’m not a convertible person. I’d rather a loaded up GTI as mentioned above and save myself $6 large and post-warranty ungodly repair invoices.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I love my VW and even I wouldnt take a chance on one of these. There is just too much risk with VW’s typical electrical gremlin history.

    Not to mention, its heavy and feels really slow. But WTF is up with everyone being able to hit 23-25mpg around town in a 2.0T?? My GTI can barely hit 21mpg around town, no matter how I drive it. I am getting frustrated, with 400 extra lbs the Eos shouldnt be doing better than my car. My dealer says there is nothing I can do, they make no guarantees on mileage. I have lived with it for 2 yrs, I just want to know why…

  • avatar
    smokingclutch

    I’d like your explanation on how this is the best retractable hard top solution on the market when the hardtop Miata:

    - Folds into the same well as the soft top, so there is no difference in cargo capacity when the top is up or down
    - Carries an approximately 70lb weight penalty over the soft top, despite the soft top not being power operated
    - has the fastest top operation of any folding hardtop

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      A guy at work had a PRHT Miata, and I never rode it when it didnt rattle like a Rubbermaid shipping truck. According to him, the top needs to be “adjusted” at the dealer every 10-15k miles or so, but in reality the adjustment only lasted 5k or so before the squeaks started again.

      Other than that, the design is brilliant, but I think the PRHT goes against the entire concept of a Miata as a simple roadster. And MX-5 PRHT is a dumb name.

    • 0 avatar
      Japanese Buick

      the Miata is a much smaller car on the inside and therefore isn’t in the same class, IMO. I own a 1996 Miata myself, I sat in a new Miata and was surprised to see that it had no more room, despite looking larger from the outside.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        I recently rode in a 5 year old Miata and they are really great. Now if only I was 5’4″ and 130 lbs. I don’t bend in all the right places to get in and out of the Miata easily.

    • 0 avatar

      The Miata’s top is best for minimizing the downsides. But, by incorporating a fully functional glass sunroof, the Eos’s is best for realizing the potential benefits of a retractable hard top.

  • avatar
    svenmeier

    I have a friend with a 1991 Mercedes 500SL that has over 300,000 km on it at this very moment. According to him the roof-mechanism needs alignment fine-tuning every 50,000 km (depending on usage) but the system has never failed him.

    A few years ago I was actually considering a 1st generation Mercedes SLK320 but it turned out to small for me. However, upon doing research on the reliability aspect of the car, I found that the foldable roof systems were quite reliable and only needed alignment fine-tuning every 50,000 km depending on usage – just like with the old 500SL of the early 1990s.

  • avatar
    mooreae100

    OK…I own this car. Practical, no…but who buys a convertible to be practical? So, if you are looking for a family car, or for a car to road trip across the country in, this is not for you. Fun, yes. Fun to drive and it’s a great drop top. I live in Virginia and have the top up all winter. The hard top is about the same as having a coupe. So yes, I like this car. That being said, the top is a mechanical…well, challenge. I actually took it into the VW dealer today because I went to put the top down for the first time this year and it didn’t go down…looks like a hydraulic pump. So, my suggestion, if you want a hard top drop top this is a pretty good car for the money. Do like I did and spend the extra $500 to get the 7 year 70,000 mile coverage. If this is your only mode of transportation, go with an SUV or a minivan…this car is for fun!!!


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