By on November 26, 2007

07shelbygt_02_hr.jpgAs automakers continue their relentless pursuit of refinement, there’s precious little “magic” to be had behind the wheel of a new car. Sit down, and you instantly know where everything is and how to operate it. Start it up and drive and few sensations are overly vivid. In short, most new cars are about as surprising as a toaster. Ford’s Mustang Shelby GT is the un-toaster. I recently braved the perils of California’s Mojave Desert (e.g. bad road food) to sample the Shelby at the Willow Springs Raceway. The experience was not bland. On the contrary, it was, erm… memorable.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. The Shelby GT is a for-the-people version of 2006’s Shelby GT-H, a special-edition ‘Stang available only for rental through Hertz. The same upgrades apply: a one-and-a-half-inch drop, stouter springs, dampers and anti-roll bars, a front strut tower brace, and a freer-breathing intake and exhaust. There’s also—wait for it— a numbered and Carroll-Shelby-signed commemorative plaque on the dash. Ooh. Aah. Sorry, just yawning.

07shelbygt_06_hr.jpgNow, this may seem like the umpteenth special-edition ‘Stang Ford has released to pump life into its retro pony’s sales (Warriors in Pink Edition, anyone?). But the car’s pert, chunky lines still draw stares. And while Shelby’s visual additions put the “tack” in tack-ons (eighteen-inch imitation “mags,” hood pins, billet grille, the usual suspects), they can be taken in good fun. Early in the day, journalists waited in line to drive this car. When’s the last time someone got excited about a rental Ford?

I mentioned memorable sensations. The first arrives when you swing open the Shelby’s heavy door and drop yourself into the dark, leather-trimmed interior. Half-filling your bunker-slit view is a hood scoop. Not a WRX-style mail slot, but the real dream-cruise deal, racing-striped and stamped into place with rivets. It’s nonfunctional, of course.

08shelbygtconver_04.jpgAt the base of the console sits another shameless, self-conscious grasp at the past: a cue-ball-topped Hurst short shifter. Try to grab a gear with this thing and it feels broken. Improbably high effort is required to scritch-scratch the lever through its tiny, gritty H-pattern, as if someone used sand as a lubricant. Stylistically, it gels seamlessly with the rest of the ‘Stang’s ‘60s-revival interior décor. And hey, at least the five-speed is a manual; the Hertz GT-H, as some may recall, was auto-only.

The salience of that last point becomes apparent upon turning the key. The noise that issues from the Shelby’s exhausts is the stuff of teenage fantasies: dense, rumbly, woofly and loud. Spine tingles come standard. And with a manual at your disposal, this luscious soundtrack inspires all kinds of delightful antisocial behaviors, from unnecessary revving at a stop to unnecessary displays of WOT on the move.

07shelbygt_09_hr.jpgAccording to Ford, the exhaust and intake combo are good for an extra 19 horses versus the standard Mustang GT, for a total of 319. That’s more than enough for serious fun, especially since the 4.6-liter V8 pours on torque thickly and smoothly in the midrange (low-end grunt is surprisingly modest). Zero to 60mph runs take just about five seconds. But the Shelby’s dynamics are, um, less than contemporary.

Readers who’ve driven the standard-issue ‘Stang are doubtless already familiar with its light, numb steering, its proclivity to understeer and the general sense of squidge in its suspension. Truth is, the Shelby’s starched suspenders don’t improve matters much. Body motions are nicely taut, and its stride feels a bit more hunkered-down. But the Shelby still left my neurons reeling as its helm scribed gloopy, too-fast arcs into Willow Springs’ sweeping high-speed corners.

07shelbygt_03.jpgAnd braking? Talk about “memorable.” The middle pedal feels weaker than a wine spritzer and mushier than Mills & Boon. Worse, the Shelby GT evinces a spooky live-axle weave when you drop anchor at triple-digit speeds. Its rear end gets loose and queasy as the front end dives to sniff the pavement. I didn’t notice any pucker marks on the seat cushion’s leather upholstery. Must be tough stuff.

Okay, so the typical Shelby GT buyer isn’t looking to run it around a track. More likely they’ll use it to cruise the main drag, luring envious glances from other aging rodders. Or maybe they’ll canter down a mountain road, reveling in the echo of its exhaust. Under such circumstances, I, too, would surely fall under the Shelby’s spell.

07shelbygt_08_hr.jpgBut hey, that’s easy to do while driving on someone else’s dime. The MSRP for this nostalgic bit of blue-oval bluster? $36,970. Seriously. And all of the performance parts are, as they say, “also sold separately.” Check ‘em off in your Ford Racing catalog and you’ll total $2,656. Budget a couple thousand more to have everything bolted onto your $25,840 Mustang GT.

Have you driven a $6,970 commemorative plaque lately? I told you it left an impression.

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63 Comments on “Ford Mustang Shelby GT Review...”


  • avatar
    Gottleib

    I think the Bullit model would be the one I would choose if and when I want a blast from the past. Now if Porsche will just bring back the 356 Speedster, now that would be the ultimate boomer retro car along with a VW Combi Bus.

  • avatar
    timoted

    For almost $37k I’d rather find a couple year old C5 or C6 vette and have an all around better performer with the same if not more aftermarket upgrades available. I guess Ford isn’t going to have too many more opportunities to use Carrol Shelby’s name while he’s alive so, they’re using it for all it’s worth. Too bad they couldnt have made it a better performer for the money.

  • avatar
    durailer

    At that price, I’d rather rent the Hertz version!

    At least the hood scoop on the Subarus are functional… Otherwise, great review.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    The Bullitt model has an even squishier suspension than the base V6 stang! Check out the pop mechanics video of their road test. It’s pretty bad. From what I’ve heard the Roush stang is the one to get.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    Dead on review. The Mustang GT is a good straight-line performance car for your dollar. The Shelby GT is just paying for a name, paying a lot. At that price a BMW 135 will get my dough.

  • avatar
    Matthew Danda

    What is Ford’s plan for this platform? Surely they aren’t going to subject it to the same living death as the PT Cruiser or VW Beetle. Or is it too late?

  • avatar
    Joe O

    Interesting review. I’ve read alot of reviews who pan this car for it’s suspension and it’s cheap interior.

    I think that the interior is so cheap and poor functioning that it deserves scorn, the backseat is smaller than the late 60′s version, and the trunk does not deserve the name it was given, the car has done exactly what Ford intended it too….

    It reinvigorated the muscle car. For $26-27k, you got a honking v8, rear wheel drive car that sounded like a muscle car, steered like a muscle car, and looked like a muscle car. It’s been a huge sales success for Ford and has helped keep their name on the map long enough to hopefully bring on some more success.

    Beyond the craptastic functionality of the interior (cup holders that are 1 to 1.5″ deep, etc.) the true crime behind this car is the number of people out there who jumped on the bandwagon to release endless “special editions”. It was a short term plan doomed for long-term scorn. Carroll Shelby lost my respect, and I’m a young’n.

    I admire the Mustang for what it is. Cheap performance in an everyman’s car. Whilst many scorn it’s live axle rear, it’s the best solution to cheap manufacturing AND durability in launch after launch.

    The mustang is the 50-and-up crowd’s WRX. Cheap interior, some functionality, lotta tunability, and wallet-friendly fun.

    Joe

  • avatar
    GS650G

    Box it up for a future ebay auction.

    Used mustang = 15K
    Suspension mods = 3K
    Supercharger kit = 4K
    Tire upgrade = 2K

    Seeing the look on someone’s face when you blow past them for 24K = priceless.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    Stupid little tricks and gimics for Ford dealers!
    Can’t make profit pushing regular Ford products? Just sell a few of these turkeys (if you can get them to from the factory) to some unsuspecting fools and your dealership will be in the black this month.

    Have the domestic automakers any pride?

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    For the record, the Mustang in “Bullet” did look like worn out mattress going around a corner. :)

  • avatar

    I see a basic problem with the basic muscle car formula: safety.

    These big[ger]-engined Mustangs are death cars. Seriously. Unless you approach a corner with deep respect, you will be in deep you know what– with no way out.

    If you think about it, the less expensive the high horsepower Mustangs are, the more dangerous it is; the price puts them in the hands of less experienced, more highly testosteroned drivers.

    Just a thought.

  • avatar

    These Shelbys are expensive and they also aren’t selling well because of it. You can have the same wheels, scoop, etc in Mustang GT with the interior and exterior appearance packages for about 10k less. I should know, my Dad bought one. He had zero interest for the Shelby after the sticker shock.

    Dad, like anyone else, can order the other Shelby goods from the FRPP catalog, or any other place that advertises in Super Ford magazine. Hell, I think one vendor sells the “Hertz” badges for $20.

    The V8s lack of low end grunt is from the torque management baked into the timing curve. Drive older 4.6L Fords and there’s none of that, you can feel when the Mustang’s electronic nanny lets go around 3000rpm.

    Spot on review, thanks P.J.

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    Nice review. I agree with the others that if you want the Mustang nostalgia and good performance, you’ll stay away from the Shelby Mustang and get a Roush Stage 3 Mustang (stay away from the Stage 1; you might as well buy a Shelby Mustang), or possibly even better a Saleen Mustang.

  • avatar
    Joe O

    RF -

    Tend to agree with you. But if you look back at some of the most sought after cars (for those less-heeled, higher-testosteroned buyers), they tend to follow that formula. The mustang is more advanced, thank God, than those older generations. Does it now come standard with stability control? If not, it should.

    It doesn’t take much power to get a young’n in trouble in a corner. Just a feeling that what they are driving is fast. As an example: look at all the crashed honda civics. (Disclaimer: I own a 2006 Honda Civic SI, uncrashed)

    Of course, a 15 second quarter mile used to be pretty darn fast. Now it’s just average.

    As almost every auto enthusiast will enthuse….if it’s not enough or too good to get you into trouble, than it’s not a real “driver’s car”. At least, that’s what every BMW and Porsche rag has been spouting for 10 years whenever a new version comes out that is heavier and has more electronic interference.

    The mustang returns to those days. On the cheap.

    Joe

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    Robert Farago :

    agreed. Fortunately, the young’uns will have to blow all their allowance on just a little gas. So maybe not as many of them as there were a few years ago!

    I wish the hell that ford (or chevy or the other one) would put as much r&d into small high strung more full efficient engines as they put in the big 8 cyl honkers. geeze. We could have a $25000 screamer that gets 40 mpg.

  • avatar
    bfg9k

    This has, what 325 hp, and a live rear axle for $35k. The WRX STi has 300 hp, AWD, and an independent suspension, for $33k in 2006. I fail to see the value in the Mustang. Sure, you get the muscle car nostalgia thing, but at the expense of handling, braking, and useful trunk and rear seat space.

  • avatar
    8rings

    I was in a Ford Dealer the other day and saw one of these on the floor with a 50k sticker!! This car is such a sham, if someone wants to pay that much money for a Shebly plaque they can go for it. I would just take 3k and do the upgrades myself, the other 6k I could put into a supercharger.
    I’ve just had enough, I’m in Oklahoma where everyone thinks that a Mustang is the best sports car you can buy and the only kind of racing is a 1/4 drag strip. Even the guys in the Estrogen Edition (V6) Mustangs think they are cool.
    Ok for a cheap V8- fast in a straight line car- I’ll give the Mustang it’s props, but a sports car it is not. You also need handling, steering and braking to meet that criteria.

  • avatar

    I agree with the others that if you want the Mustang nostalgia and good performance, you’ll stay away from the Shelby Mustang and get a Roush Stage 3 Mustang (stay away from the Stage 1; you might as well buy a Shelby Mustang), or possibly even better a Saleen Mustang.

    Or bypass all the branding premiums (unless you really go for that) get the same stuff from less popular vendors. The Ford Racing Performance Products catalog is a good start, easily installed by the dealer and most of it retains the factory warranty.

    But if you’re serious, grab a Mustang-themed magazine and get the real parts (i.e. Griggs racing suspension components) without the Roush/Saleen non-functional junk.

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    Or bypass all the branding premiums (unless you really go for that) get the same stuff from less popular vendors. The Ford Racing Performance Products catalog is a good start, easily installed by the dealer and most of it retains the factory warranty.

    But if you’re serious, grab a Mustang-themed magazine and get the real parts (i.e. Griggs racing suspension components) without the Roush/Saleen non-functional junk.

    True, if it’s not a new car that you are buying. I completely share your opinion on the ridiculous badging, side skirts, etc. But, won’t buying a plain Mustang GT and adding aftermarket parts yourself void the warrantee? Of course in a couple of years, a modified used Mustang will become a real option. Buy a four or five year old Mustang with the great (IMO) looking redesign, then add a supercharger, better suspension parts, etc. without the pointless body modifications.

  • avatar
    fellswoop

    Fake scoops make baby darwin cry.

  • avatar
    P71_CrownVic

    I saw a Corvette ZO6 in the local “Auto Trader” with around 10K miles for $35K.

    Hmmm…do I buy a 30 year-old looking pig with even older suspension, or a ZO6 that will run with 911s all day?

    ZO6 please!

  • avatar
    BEAT

    Hey this mustang is awesome!!! Factory SRI and muffler are all you need to sound like a street racer I bet the sound is awesome on this Mustang.

    The Loud sound is typical for a car with High performance muffler and intake system and Just imagine driving a Lambo.

    I love the sound it makes people turn their heads especially young ladies that are into rice rockets.

    Look at that Shift knob, Ford forgot to put the #8 on the ball.

    If you never driven a Ford Mustang, Keep Quiet you don’t know what you’re Missing.

    By the way, We DON’T need to Buy Parts or spend $3,000 for this Mustang a whopping 319 is already enough to leave your ego in your wallet.

    Well, Good luck on finding one on a Hertz rent car. They don’t usually let you drive a mustang except if you’re a high profile executive with a week or a month of car rental. Their typical loaner are Dodge Neon or Ford Taurus.

  • avatar

    But, won’t buying a plain Mustang GT and adding aftermarket parts yourself void the warrantee?

    Nope. Most everything from the FRPP catalog (unless indicated) is available at the local Ford parts dept and can be installed yourself without voiding the warranty. (or let the dealer install it and put the burden on them…at $75 an hour)

    I haven’t driven a Mustang with the FRPP Performance packs (suspension, cosmetics, superchargers in various levels of boost) but you can bet it’ll put down the same numbers as a Shelby/Saleen/Roush with very little labor on the owner’s part.

    Course if you want to get serious, don’t wait for these retro Mustangs to get out of warranty, get a Foxbody Mustang and take advantage of its smaller size and lower weight. Go to town on that bad boy!

    (or get a used C5 vette like P71_crownvic said and do nothing to it!)

  • avatar
    Larry P2

    This car flies in the face of the conventional knowledge regarding the woes of domestic automakers that is the recieved wisdom on this site.

    It sells for $36K because it can and it will sell like hotcakes for in excess of MSRP. Should the 2.5 try to fight head to head with Toyonda on their middle-brow yawnmobiles, or should they stake out their exclusive turf with ponycars where they have no competition? I bet the Mustang and camaro and challenger are more competitive against Accords and Camrys than is a fusion or a malibu or a PT Cruiser. Will a lot of buyers decide they aren’t quite dead yet, eschew the Toyonda blandmobiles and decide that this new rash of ponycars can perform most of the same functions with similar fue economy? I.E. ferrying one person on the daily commute.

    Second, I bet the used car residuals on these speciality Mustangs is sky high – probably well in excess of anything Japanese or European. In fact, I would bet there is a fair chance at this Mustang gradually increasing in value over the years.

  • avatar

    Larry P2: there are plenty of Shelby GTs sitting on the lots for months, they are not selling well. Unlike the GT500s, they sit with zero markup on them.

    Two months ago I found a bunch of 2007 Shelby GTs on Ford’s inventory lookup website: the Shelby’s are easy to find because they are ordered as Mustang GT’s with no factory installed spoiler. That, and the insane asking price.

    Maybe the Shelby GT (not 500) will have long term growth potential like the slow selling Plymouth Superbirds, but I’m not holding my breath on that.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Can’t we just buy a bottle of “Z-Max” for that Shelby feeling?

  • avatar
    Larry P2

    Well, Sajeev, part of what has given the Plymouth Superbirds their legedary multimillion dollar auction prices is the fact that they sat – literally visibly rusting away – sometimes for two or three years, until some dealers removed the ugly nose and ridiculous sky-high spoiler and sold them as normal Chargers!

    I haven’t seen a Shelby GT or GT500 on any Ford lot around here, but then again, this is the epicenter of redneck culture possibly for the whole world. Live rear axles rule here. I just happened to see about 90 miles from here the one and only SHelby GT in this whole multistate area. If they aren’t selling in San Francisco and Boston and other Prius-lands and sitting on dealer lots, then Ford is blowing a huge selling opportunity.

  • avatar
    Matthew Danda

    Farago:

    If you think about it, the less expensive the high horsepower Mustangs are, the more dangerous it is; the price puts them in the hands of less experienced, more highly testosteroned drivers.

    Actually, you should replace the word “Mustang” with “Suzuki GSX-R” or “Hayabusa”. A teenager can get his hands on a 5-year-old 130+HP motorcycle for a few thousand bucks and discover rather quickly whether the afterlife exists.

  • avatar
    LtSolo

    I agree with this review. The Shelby edition steals the money out of people’s pocket who are too ignorant to realize there are much better cars out there.

    I have driven a Mustang (V-6, GT, GT Convertible, the Shelby Edition, and the real Hertz GT-H in Las Vegas… for a paltry $100… government rate! :-) So I DO KNOW what I’m talking about.

    I almost bought a Mustang last April. I almost had an original E30 BMW M3, owned by Mario Andretti no less, and had it sniped from me by a Californian for $3000 over what I was willing to pay. Then I had a deposit on an original 1983 Audi Ur-Quattro… which got promptly totaled when the dealer took it to get aligned.

    SO! I was in the market for a sporty car to trade my trusty Ford F-150 in on, and I promptly went to the local Ford dealer here in Oklahoma to look at Mustangs. Yes, they are fast in a straight line. Yes, they handle decently, and yes, for a small sum of $25000, you can get a decent Mustang GT. I nearly signed the papers despite the killer depreciation, the bad, plasticky interior, the really bad leather, and the iffy, iffy handling.

    Then….

    I drove a Porsche Boxster. The base model. I was smitten. For the same price as a base GT, I could get a used legend.

    Then….

    I drove the Boxster S. For the same price ($27K) as a Mustang GT Convertible (with appearance package), I could drive a true modern classic. The car is absolutely brilliant. I drove the Mustang again to see if I really wanted a Porsche. The dynamics were so bad by comparison, so raw, unrefined, so…. half-assed that the great exhaust note and styling seemed to be just a show to say, “I know my car looks better than me, but you will still sleep with me just the same…. despite my Mossy Oak camoflage and growing beer gut”.

    Then I drove other cars, the STI, the Evo, a Z06, a Jaguar XK8… even a stinking Audi RS4. The more I drove other cars, the more the Mustang seemed a fashion statement for those who didn’t really know much about other cars. So if I had to sum up the Mustang, here is what I would say:

    CHEAP SPEED? Yes!

    SMART SPEED? NOOOOO!!!!!!

    P.S. BEAT, if you want to drive something other than a Dodge Neon at the rental agency, all you have to do is request it…. AND be OVER 25. Since turning 25, I have gotten a Cadillac CTS, a Chrysler Pacifica, two Volvo V70′s, an Audi Q7, A4, and even an A3. I even got a Toyota Prius to drive to Mexico in….. don’t get me started on that car… it sapped my will to live in about 10 minutes, and I own a Jetta TDI.

  • avatar

    Larry, no doubt the Superbird deserves its rags to riches status, but I don’t see the Shelby GT pulling that off. That’s partially because its not the top of the line model, but mostly because its cosmetic enhancements are very similar to a decked out Mustang GT. The Superbird was unique in many aspects, but (other than Marketing buzz) there is little special about this ride.

    But then we have the GT500. Its the heir apparent to the Superbird. Sure it sits for months, but every Ford dealer has $10,000+ markup on them. They are a hot commodity because they are the top dog in Ford’s lineup.

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    Good point about the Fox Body Mustangs. They are good car for a modern hotrodder who doesn’t want to drive a ricer and likes doing mods him/herself. Relatively light with a huge choice of aftermarket parts, and they still cost next to nothing. Mustang fans are starting to catch on though, and we could see the prices on these ugly stepchildren start to rise a little in the coming years as people start to buy and modify them.

  • avatar
    whatdoiknow1

    The Mustang is like the 300c and Charger, remove the V8 from the equation and what you are left with is a complete POS with very little or no appeal to it.

    So all of these Mustang GT fans appear to be purchasing an “option” attached to the cheapest platform on the market.

  • avatar
    Dynamic88

    “It sells for $36K because it can and it will sell like hotcakes for in excess of MSRP. Should the 2.5 try to fight head to head with Toyonda on their middle-brow yawnmobiles, or should they stake out their exclusive turf with ponycars where they have no competition? I bet the Mustang and camaro and challenger are more competitive against Accords and Camrys than is a fusion or a malibu or a PT Cruiser. Will a lot of buyers decide they aren’t quite dead yet, eschew the Toyonda blandmobiles and decide that this new rash of ponycars can perform most of the same functions with similar fue economy? I.E. ferrying one person on the daily commute.”

    They should focus on yawnmobiles as that is a much larger market. Nothing wrong with offering the Mustang, in addition to the Yawnmobile, but it’s a small niche.

    I don’t see a lot of buyers changing their mind and getting the ‘Stang instead of the Camry. You either want a Mustang, or it’s not even on your radar.

    This is getting away from the Shelby in particular, but I thought the original Mustang was a fairly inexpensive car. I think they start at about $19K right now for the base model. It might be interesting to compare that to the price of the ’65 car, adjusting the $ for inflation, or looking at the prices as a % of MHI.

  • avatar
    skor

    When the current gen Mustang became available, the critics bashed it — mostly for lack of IRS.

    I thought that there was method to Ford’s madness. I assumed that the first couple of model years would be available with solid axle only since Ford knew that there were thousands of knuckle-draggers who would buy the car for the new body style no matter what held it up. I further assumed that Ford would add modern bits to the car to keep up interest(and sales) as it aged. I guessed wrong.

    Apparently there is no method at Ford, only madness.

  • avatar
    twilker

    I am sorry, this old cow won’t milk.

  • avatar
    KnightRT

    “Have you driven a $6,970 commemorative plaque lately?”

    You were on fire with that one. Ouch.

  • avatar

    Not a WRX-style mail slot, but the real dream-cruise deal, racing-striped and stamped into place with rivets. It’s nonfunctional, of course.

    I think that sums up this car nicely.

  • avatar
    NickR

    Not a WRX-style mail slot, but the real dream-cruise deal, racing-striped and stamped into place with rivets. It’s nonfunctional, of course.

    Frommage.

    At least the old Shaker, Air Grabber, and Cowl Induction hoods were functional.

  • avatar
    f8

    Mustangs can admittedly be pretty cool, but like Camaros, they aren’t good sports cars. Yeah, they look pretty good, but in this price bracket an STI will destroy a Shelby GT in any race imaginable and would still be far more practical and comfortable in every aspect

  • avatar
    f8

    By the way – I decided to look up Shelby GT500s, and there are several in my area.

    Here’s one: http://www.cars.com/go/search/detail.jsp;?tracktype=usedcc&searchType=21&pageNumber=0&numResultsPerPage=50&largeNumResultsPerPage=0&sortorder=descending&sortfield=PRICE+descending&certifiedOnly=false&criteria=K-%7CE-%7CM-_14_%7CD-_179_%7CN-N%7CR-100%7CI-1%7CP-PRICE+descending%7CQ-descending%7CZ-95051&aff=national&paId=242507390&recnum=0&leadExists=true

    Here’s another! http://www.cars.com/go/search/detail.jsp;?tracktype=usedcc&searchType=21&pageNumber=0&numResultsPerPage=50&largeNumResultsPerPage=0&sortorder=descending&sortfield=PRICE+descending&certifiedOnly=false&criteria=K-%7CE-%7CM-_14_%7CD-_179_%7CN-N%7CR-100%7CI-1%7CP-PRICE+descending%7CQ-descending%7CZ-95051&aff=national&paId=250727502&recnum=1&leadExists=true

    Just $77,575. Any takers? There are some 2007 Shelbys for just $65K as well

  • avatar
    Johnster

    Doesn’t the Infiniti G37 have close to the same list price? I suppose it’s not as fast in a straight line, but give me some finesse and some handling. Let me know that I’m paying for some engineering.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Does Shelby seriously have any “street cred” with the kids these days? I mean since I’ve seen him peddling Z-Max on TV I would be embarassed to have his name on my car.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    I really don’t see the value. You can get a left-over ’07 Corvette “redtagged” at like $38000 here in Detroit. Faster,safer car. Or an Infiniti G37 which is almost as fast,rides better. Is a much nicer place to spend time.

    Of course, this brings up another point. The price. Once upon a time, the pony cars were for young males who were getting their first job. They were affordable fun cars. OF course, now that there are few good jobs for young men…who buys these things?

  • avatar

    Just in case it got lost in the comments, you can have all the exterior/interior upgrades of the Shelby EXCEPT for the stripes and badges on a regular GT. And that will set you back around $29,000. Add the suspension, induction/exhaust and shifter from FRPP and you’ll be out the door (dealer installed, full warranty) for about $3000 more.

    And unlike the Shelby GT, that’s quite respectable.

    A sample of the FRPP packages, thanks to Muscle Mustangs and Fast Fords’ Project MILF .

  • avatar
    Sanman111

    In my opinion, special edition cars come in three varities with very few exceptions:

    1. They do very little except slap a badge on the back and charge more

    2. They take an already good car and turn it into something ridiculous, like a track special(see s2000 cr)

    3. They take a craptastic car and make it what it should have been in the first place for way more than it should cost.

    I’ll let you decide which category the mustang falls into.

  • avatar
    Larry P2

    I seriously doubt that anyone in the target market for a Shelby Mustang, or any ponycar for that matter, would even be remotely interested in an Infiniti, a Porsche Boxter, or a Subaru.

    I would dare say that similarly, anybody interested in a Jeep Wrangler would not seriously look at a Mazda or lexus crossover, a Porsche Cayenne or an escape hybrid.

  • avatar
    Justin Berkowitz

    @Matthew Danda
    Re: Motorcycles being suicide for kids.

    You are totally, 100% right. A very nice guy I went to high school with passed away in the seat of a high performance bike. Not enough experience + extreme horsepower + the dangers of a 20-something attitude = recipe for disaster.

    @Larry P2
    I seriously doubt that anyone in the target market for a Shelby Mustang, or any ponycar for that matter, would even be remotely interested in an Infiniti, a Porsche Boxter, or a Subaru.
    I agree with you completely. This causes two problems:
    (1) Some people read a review like this and say “that guy is crazy. this is an amazing car. who would want a stupid bmw” and
    (2) The number of people that want a car like this is shrinking. Which is a problem. I agree that the big 2.8 must fight Toyota, Honda etc on their own turf (i.e. RWD big cars with panache) but if you look at the sales numbers, this Mustang is not the way to do it.

  • avatar
    Larry P2

    Justin,

    RE: Shrinking market for ponycars

    Time will tell, once the new Challenger and Camaro hit the dealer lots and the modern day horsepower wars finally heat up in earnest. It will be interesting the kind of frisson and syncronisity the three of them will generate.

    I would say it is pretty hard to predict a “shrinking market” when GM hasn’t had a ponycar for almost 10 years and Chrysler has stayed out of the market forever.

    On modern V8 powered hotrods: Nothing like having 400 horses and still get 25 mpg highway for around $30 K. Of course, I reside in what many people are calling the epicenter of American hotrodding. Just in my neighborhood alone, in a mile radius, there are no fewer than 10 custom hotrod builders.

    People around here wouldn’t be caught dead in an infiniti. Everybody, and I mean everybody, is waiting to buy one of the new camaros and challengers the minute they can.

    And compared to the imports, the performance aftermarket for hotrodding late-model Mustangs is really unbelievable. When you buy a Mustang, you are benefiting from a deeply-discount performance bonanza. There are at least three or four late GTs in this area that are pumping out around 7 or 800 non-juiced horses for about $15,000 in off-the-shelf parts. And they are nice docile daily drivers to boot.

    Hilariously, there is a business calling itself the “General Store” which carries everything from guns to fleece underwear to women’s clothing that right now on its shelves has everything you need to boost a stock GT into the 500 to 550 horse range.

    What would it cost to build a Porsche Boxter with 700 horses?

  • avatar
    8rings

    The fact that the Mustang is a “deeply-discount performance bonanza” has never really been argued in my opinion. However this goes back to the fact that there are two kinds of enthusiast drivers, those that only go fast in a straight line and those that race on a real racetrack (with turns)!
    A Mustang pumping out 7-800 Hp is impressive, but it is only good for one thing, getting down the 1/4 mile, it still can’t handle or steer. Maybe it can brake if you have done the upgrades.
    How much would a 700hp Boxster cost, a years salary for most of us. But why build a 700hp boxster? To go drag racing? The boxster is an all around great sports car, it does everything well. Bring the Boxster to the drag strip and it gets smoked, bring a 700hp Mustang out to a road course and a stock Boxster S will smoke it.
    We are comparing apples to oragnes on this one I’m afraid. And no I don’t own a Boxster, but I do race on real racetracks- where you are required to heel & toe- understand oversteer, understeer, weight transfer, trail braking, etc…
    The Mustang…stomp on the gas when you see a green light…..now that is race driving (or not).

  • avatar
    Larry P2

    But generally speaking, if it isn’t the “oranges” of “those that race on a real racetrack,” then it isn’t about to get a fair reception on this site, correct?

    How many boxters, WRX’s and Infinitis, btw, are actually wheeled on “a real racetrack?” Not very many, I would guess. However, there are tons of people with daily drivers with a horse on the nose with those archaic live rear axles who do very well “getting down the 1/4 mile.” On real live racetracks.

    Nobody so far has mentioned the almost insurmountable disadvantage of IRS on a dragstrip – the real racetrack where one is most likely to see a box stock shelby.

  • avatar
    Jim H

    Frankly, I’m surprised it got 3 stars and not 2. Is a V8 that gets 15/23 actually a good indicator of performance? :)

    “Seeing the look on someone’s face when you blow past them for 24K = priceless” — actually, it’s $24K. :)

  • avatar
    IronEagle

    8rings said:
    7-800 Hp is impressive, but it is only good for one thing, getting down the 1/4 mile, it still can’t handle or steer.

    Oh come on are you kidding me? Mustangs have been roadracing forever since the 1960s. There are whole chassis upgrades such as subframe connectors (best mod I EVER did to an 89 GT back in the day), strut braces, rollcages, sway bars and spring shock packages that turn a modern Mustang into a true road racer. You can also swap out the IRS from the SN95 Modular Cobras into your SN95 live axle GT and vice versa.

    Don’t get me wrong I wouldn’t buy a new Mustang but they are not just a 1/4 mile drag car IMO.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Oh come on are you kidding me? Mustangs have been roadracing forever since the 1960s. There are whole chassis upgrades such as subframe connectors (best mod I EVER did to an 89 GT back in the day), strut braces, rollcages, sway bars and spring shock packages that turn a modern Mustang into a true road racer. You can also swap out the IRS from the SN95 Modular Cobras into your SN95 live axle GT and vice versa.

    Don’t get me wrong I wouldn’t buy a new Mustang but they are not just a 1/4 mile drag car IMO.

    Ah…ya. None of those things come on this car and if you buy this car you won’t have any money left over to buy those upgrades. What was your point again? Moral of the story. Buy a Roush.

  • avatar
    LtSolo

    I do race a Boxster. And I race it against a roadrace modified Mustang GT, just like Iron Eagle said. Guess who won? Yep, I DIDN”T! Go to OKSCCA.org to see the results. However, the car was undriveable on the street, and I mean UNDRIVEABLE. It had to be trailored.

    On that same site, look at the results for the modified Mustang GT’s, yep, the ones in the F-Stock class. They are out run by Audi TT’s, VW Passat Wagons, BMW’s, stock Miata’s, Mini Cooper’s, a Datsun 240Z, and RX-8, and so on, and so on. You can make a Mustang a track car, but then you can’t drive it on the road. Keep it to where you can drive it on the road, and it won’t make for a very good track car. The results at the race track, where I race, and win, prove it.

    But go to the 1/4 track, and I lose, all the time. But I don’t want a car that is a one trick pony.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Stupid Question Alert! – I’ve seen the hood release pins on the Hertz version also – do they serve a purpose or are they just something that will eventually look like junk after 50,000 miles?

    Any ETA on when Ford is going to slap some fake fender vents on the Mustang? Hopefully they’ll put on those huge and very hideous fake Super Duty vents and really make the ‘stang look bitchin’!

    $7K for a badge. I’ll walk away shaking my head in disbelief.

    I think we have another candidate for the Ford Death Watch since if they think there’s a market for a 40k Mustang (and that dealer charging 50K should be shut down now), they deserve their fate. Mustangs really aren’t known for long term quality (how many Mustangs from 1993 to maybe 1996 do you see these days?) and their depreciation is heart stopping.

    I’ll take the G37, thank you very much.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    “Warriors in Pink” edition…oh yeah.

    If they want to go purely retro, let’s have the “1973 edition.” A wolf howling at the moon will be airbrushed on the rear fenders. Fuzzy dice will be bonded to the rear view mirror. Peeled tinting film is standard. They’ll rip out the leather and put in that horrid sticky vinyl that ripped everywhere and had the sharp metal edges that tore your legs up. 8-track changer is standard. Your choice of the “BACK OFF” or nude woman mudflaps. They leave the factory with rust already on the body (random for each car.) 4 drum brakes. Add some sagging shocks and springs, random leaks, ALT and GEN lights on the dash that never turn off, a lingering odor of water damage and whatever happened in the car the previous night, and one novelty horn and FORD HAS A HIT!!!

    Or Ford can keep burning money into an ancient platform instead of making it better and modern.

  • avatar
    rtx

    “Have you driven a $6,970 commemorative plaque lately? I told you it left an impression.”

    Very true…..It’s a shame that Ford and Shelby have stooped to this level. Shelby was at one time a very influential part of Ford and responsible for many Ford racetrack wins.
    Now he seems to have sold out his name to try and help the fading blue oval bring in those badly needed $$$.
    I wonder if the Shelby Memorial Mustang is in the works? I would hope that Shelby would want to look after his family and since neither him nor FoMoCo has any pride left the SMM makes a lot of sense.

  • avatar

    Autoextremist has some VERY unkind words about Mr. Shelby here.

  • avatar

    Great car, when you just want to go straight.

    Jon
    http://www.sportscardriven.com

  • avatar
    Realracer

    I think most of you dont get what this car is about. It’s not about being a better value than a STI or even a base GT. Its about history, exclusivity, and human nature.

    I still am amazed that so many people even mention the Shelby GT500 and Shelby GT in the same sentence. While the 500 may be the king in performance, its 100% assembled by Ford, never seeing, or for that matter earning registry with Shelby. I could understand the outrage over the 500 but the Shelby GT is actually (granted with bolt on Ford parts) modified at Shelby Automobiles shop and is registered as an authentic Shelby.

    Now this wont win any races but it will become a worthwhile part of history. As we move into the hybrid era, there will be collectors that will crave some of the last made registered Shelbys. I for one would love to be able to pass down to my son a piece of muscle car history before we are all driving golf carts.

    So, I dont think a regular GT or even a Ford badged “Shelby” GT500 is going to have the same long-term collectibility of a registered Shelby GT from Shelby Auto. $35k doesn’t buy much car today and to me that doesn’t seem like a ridiculous price to pay to own a piece of history.

    Lastly, as a licensed SCCA driver and PDA instructor, I have had the pleasure to drive many, many cars (including the STI, Boxster S, M3, regular GT but not the Shelby). All of these cars exhibit different qualities. Some can make even the sloppiest drivers look good (aka – STI and Boxster). The Mustang is…..a modern day muscle car…PERIOD. If you actually know how to drive (most think they do but truly know little) then you can pull some fast laps in a Mustang and have a blast doing it.

    So what does it boil down to? I guess it depends on what you are looking for. If I have the resources, I would own the Boxster S and the Shelby GT and that would be the best of both worlds.

    Dont kid yourself, humans have a terrible habit of collecting / nostalgia and the Shelby name is probably as significant as Enzo Ferrari. Look what happened to the value of all Ferraris produced prior to Enzo’s passing (oh yeah, like the 308 wasn’t a mega piece of overpriced crap!). Shelby is 85 and odds are he wont be around for much longer – hope thats not true…just based on statistics…..stay well Mr. Shelby!

  • avatar
    SkyDancer

    I just love reading the opinions of people about this Shelby Mustang GT….and
    I really get a kick out of the fact that it is painfully obvious that every one of the SGT dissenters don’t have a single clue about why people would buy this car.

    First it is the first Mustang in over 40 years that Caroll Shelby and his facility in
    Nevada had an actual hand in building after the base GT model left the Ford
    production facility. That alone makes the car an instant collectable for car
    collector enthusiasts.

    Barrett-Jackson auctioned SGT #0001 (and I am not mixing that up with the GT500) for $650,000 which will set the baseline for its future value in 20 years time.

    Second – if a GT350 isn’t produced in the years to come, the SGT just may inherit the slot as being the GT350 that never came about. Though this is just speculation it is
    possible given the economic climate and certain info that has come from both Ford
    and SAI about whether a GT350 will or will not be made.

    Third – This isn’t about what is a better made car….it is about nostalgia…which is
    something most people in the United States between the ages of 16 and 40 don’t
    have a single clue about because they have nothing in their past that they can get
    excited about.

    Instead they would rather get distracted, sucked up and diverted away from things
    that have a potential toward apprecating in worth and instead spend all their energy,
    time and money on worthless techno-wizard gadgetry, video games and sound systems
    so they can remain dumb, stupid and ignorant about the finer things of life.

  • avatar
    StevoApex

    I appreciate many of the comments of some here who have a clue about this car. The SGT is force in both performance and in the fun factor. I recently had the opportunity to drive a SGT and it was a blast. You won’t confuse it with a WRX or the G37 thats for sure. I’ve owned two WRX’s, not STI’s, but still, all wheel drive is just lame unless its raining, or snowing; utterly boring unless driven at the limit, a torqueless nanny car. A turbo charged 4 banger just isnt the same as a free breathing V8. Buying a Shelby used for about 25-28k is so much more fun. Probably best suited as a second car and driven for fun only. If your looking for daily driver or gauge performance by a just specs alone you might as well get many other vehicles; however, if theres blood in your veins and any testoserone left in your body, you will immediately get the the point of the SGT.

  • avatar
    spiderj0e

    OK I dont normally post on sites but I have to. Shelby what can I say the name is a legend. All the people here talkin crap about it dont know much about cars. Ok performance is not all a car is about. Style neither. Limited Numbers make a giant difference. I have driven more cars then most know exist. A base model gt is a nice car. I own a 2007. Sure I can get frrp parts that make it a shelby without the name plate but 60 years from now what car will sell at a bj auction for a ridiculous amount. Another thing I live in las vegas (world office of shelby) shelby is offering a s/c or s/r upgrade to a base model gt that will register it as a shelby Limited Number. Also you peeps baggin on handling and saying only good in strait line. Who is owning the drift circuit. Mustang. And take a look at other mods from other companies like griggs racing. Solid axel mustangs with less horse power are destroying corvettes porshe bmw!!! sorry for the rant but SHELBY will allways be a great investment.


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