Report: Biden to Use Wartime Powers to Boost EV Battery Production

U.S. President Joe Biden is said to be considering utilizing wartime powers to spur domestic electric vehicle battery production. The administration reportedly wants to add the necessary raw materials to the Defense Production Act (DPA) penned at the start of the Korean War in 1950.

Originally designed to give the federal government more control of the U.S. economy (especially in regard to raw materials) throughout the Cold War, the law has also been leveraged by the Department of Defense to advance new technologies starting in the 1980s. In 2011, Barack Obama invoked the act to force telecommunications companies to provide detailed information to the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security. Donald Trump would later invoke the DPA to identify an array of products deemed critical to national security as the trade war with China heated up, and then again to spearhead domestic production of materials and goods pertaining to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Sheer Magnetism: Toyota's Plan for a Cheaper EV Involves Hard-to-pronounce Words

If buyers really do plan to line up to buy electric vehicles, even before the government forces them to, automakers had best figure out a way to make them affordable not just to buy, but to build.

We all know battery packs are expensive (with ingredients clouded by child labor and environmental issues), but batteries are only part of the equation. While simple in operation, electric motors are nothing like the aluminum or iron affairs under the hood of your dad’s Buick Enclave. There’s a lot of metals you’ve never heard of in a permanent magnet AC motor.

Toyota, which wants to be an electric car bigshot, just figured out a way to make a cheaper motor.

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China Will Again Control Rare Metals in Hybrids, Other Cars

Metals found in hybrid batteries, diesel fuel and headlight glass could again be subject to China’s ever-changing rules for rare earth exports.

On Wednesday, Molycorp announced that it would be suspending its mining operations of rare earth metals in California, but keep its mines in China and Estonia open for the time being.

The company, which went public in 2011, has fallen on hard times. In June, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and slowing demand in China isn’t helping. However, without a mine in the U.S., much of the rare earth metal mined in the world could be under Chinese government purview, and that’s not good.

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  • SCE to AUX One world government would solve this problem.
  • Master Baiter [list=1][*]Add a HUD.[/*][*]Improve ride quality.[/*][*]4680 cells.[/*][*]Improve rearward visibility.[/*][*]15 year battery warranty.[/*][*]Improve front-end styling. [/*][/list=1]
  • Ajla "cutting the number of components involved in the production and for the car’s interior."This is like Calista Flockhart going on a crash diet.
  • SCE to AUX "...as soon as late 2023"I'll hold my breath. TSLA has fallen a lot lately, so this news is timed to fix that.
  • Tassos Most of these are utterly unnecessary. Winter tires especially, they cost $, take too much space to store, and if you have a good set of all season tires, you sure do not need them. I have driven in MI for 45 years, never had winter tires, the last 20 years I drove only RWD cars, and still never needed them. If you own a flagship German car, like I did for many years, air filters can be very expensive. I tried to replace mine this fall, but they asked 4 times what I paid for the exact same part overseas (I own identical 2007 and 2008 E320 Diesels). You can always roll down a window by 1 inch or less in the winter and refresh your cabin air. Wipers are rarely used during winter, you can clean the snow with your scraper, use wipers only when it rains hard. I keep mine for at least two years. Microfiber towels may be good. I never used them. Are they washable in the washing machine? ANd how 'cheap' are they exactly?