By on March 30, 2022

U.S. President Joe Biden is said to be considering utilizing wartime powers to spur domestic electric vehicle battery production. The administration reportedly wants to add the necessary raw materials to the Defense Production Act (DPA) penned at the start of the Korean War in 1950.

Originally designed to give the federal government more control of the U.S. economy (especially in regard to raw materials) throughout the Cold War, the law has also been leveraged by the Department of Defense to advance new technologies starting in the 1980s. In 2011, Barack Obama invoked the act to force telecommunications companies to provide detailed information to the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security. Donald Trump would later invoke the DPA to identify an array of products deemed critical to national security as the trade war with China heated up, and then again to spearhead domestic production of materials and goods pertaining to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Biden actually used it on his second day in office to further increase production of supplies related to the pandemic and then again in March of 2021 to supply equipment to Merck facilities manufacturing Johnson & Johnson vaccines. He invoked the Defense Protection Act a third time in September to supplement the supply of fire hoses intended to combat an unusually high number of wildfires taking place on the West Coast.

This time, the goal is to incorporate lithium, nickel, graphite, cobalt, and manganese into the government list of extra-important materials. According to Bloomberg, officials that leaked the plan (who it said asked to remain anonymous) believe the relevant mining companies could access $750 million under the Defense Production Act’s Title III fund. Funds and relief may also be established to encourage new battery recycling centers.

From Bloomberg:

Instead of loans or direct purchases for minerals, the directive would fund production at current operations, productivity and safety upgrades, and feasibility studies, the person said. In addition to EV batteries, the directive also would apply to large-capacity batteries.

Administration officials are working to ensure production will occur under strong environmental and labor standards, one of the people familiar said. Amid concerns from critics, including some Democratic members of Congress, aides are taking steps to make sure the presidential actions won’t skirt environmental reviews or permit regulations, the person said.

Several departments, including Energy and Interior, will oversee the effort, the person said.

The directive also would pave the way for Congress to allocate more resources to the effort, said Ben Steinberg, co-chair of the critical infrastructure group at D.C. lobbying firm Venn Strategies.

“The president’s signature is a big signal, but it’s incumbent on the Congress to appropriate dollars that are commensurate with the challenge,” Steinberg told the outlet, adding that the funding available via the DPA might not be sufficient since it currently has to cover numerous industries.

A bipartisan group of U.S. senators — including Joe Manchin (D-WV), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), James Risch (R-ID), and Bill Cassidy (R-LA) — previously asked the White House to consider leveraging the Defense Production Act to encourage localized battery production. The following weeks included rampant speculation that it was under consideration. But this is the first time we’ve heard the news that the Biden administration was planning to move forward.

Critics will undoubtedly point to this as an example of the Biden administration utilizing wartime provisions to advance its green agenda. But it’s not so cut and dried as that. One of my many criticisms regarding the transition to electric vehicles in the West was that it would overwhelmingly advantage Chinese battery producers that already dominate the market. Having the government provide domestic rivals with a leg up, while also focusing on the need to procure raw materials, seems prudent if the shift toward EVs is to continue at the desired breakneck pace. Though valid concerns will remain as to which parties will be getting favorable treatment, how funding will ultimately be allocated, and what that means in terms of the ongoing relationship between big business and the United States government.

The Biden administration has already set aside billions in funding for EVs in numerous infrastructure bills. But prices pertaining to their raw materials have been skyrocketing of late and have only been made worse due to the war in Ukraine. Bloomberg speculated that this could be a boon for mining operations and help tamp down costs while also serving as a way to endear the administration to an industry it previously shunned. Unfortunately, this runs the risk of placing the White House at odds with environmental activists that want people to drive all-electric vehicles without having to bore into the earth to acquire the necessary metals.

[Image: Orhan Cam/Shutterstock]

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139 Comments on “Report: Biden to Use Wartime Powers to Boost EV Battery Production...”


  • avatar
    RangerM

    My governor (NC) has yet to give up his “emergency powers” too.

    At some point, I’ve got to believe people are going to tire of it (from the States or the Feds)

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The way to curb the power of the US president is for both parties in Congress to start working together and tell the president what to do. They can do that.

      The executive branch only has as much power as it does because Mitch McConnel keeps congress paralyzed.

      I imagine NC has similar issues, though following NC politics hasn’t been a priority for me personally.

      • 0 avatar
        RangerM

        Exactly what does Mitch McConnell have to do with Biden’s misuse of wartime powers? Chuck Schumer is in charge of the Senate.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          @RangerM
          “Exactly what does Mitch McConnell have to do with Biden’s misuse of wartime powers?”

          Mitch McConnel’s resistance on inaction increases Biden’s power.

          Someone has to solve our nation’s problems. If Congress won’t act, then the president does.

          Congress has the lower to tell the president what to do. That’s what “Executive” means, the Executive Branch executes the government policy of the United States of America, and that policy is set by Congress.

          By insisting that Congress do nothing, biden is given enormous attitude to use his own judgment.

          The problem, of course, is that curbing the power of the presidency this way requires the Republican leadership in Congress to admit that our nation has problems and then negotiate and compromise with the Democratic leadership in Congress to solve those problems, and Republicans are morally opposed to that. As a result, Biden ends up more power than any president in a Western Democracy should have.

          This is a fixable problem.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Elections have consequences. Win more of them and this won’t be an issue. Republicans are behaving in the same manner Democrats did when Bush was in the White House and how their voters expect

            If you could get your entire party in line even (Manchin, Sinema) it would be a non issue. But you can’t so partisan hacks like you do what they do…blame big bad Mitch.

            Take your grievances up with voters in West Virginia and Arizona. You can’t pass your agenda because you haven’t won enough seats to overcome the fact that a couple of your own Senators don’t support your nonsense.

            Anyway, if you are correct Democrats should wipe the floor with Mitch’s party in the mid terms. How’s that looking?

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Luke42–Good points. My opinion is that many Republicans are more interested in the next election and making the President look bad than actually doing something and risking that whatever they do could might alienate voters. Blame it on the Democrats and don’t admit that our nation has problems that need to be addressed regardless of which political party is in power. Better to do nothing and blame the opposition. Negotiation and compromise seem to be dirty words.

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            @Luke42

            You didn’t answer the question.

            You can’t wash away Biden’s responsibility for his actions by deflection; unless you want to claim he doesn’t know what he’s doing.

            Here’s how to “fix” your fixable problem, btw. Instead of producing Omnibus bills that contain aspects that the parties can’t support, why not break them up into small(er) bills that contain just those items where both sides agree?

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            “Here’s how to “fix” your fixable problem, btw. Instead of producing Omnibus bills that contain aspects that the parties can’t support, why not break them up into small(er) bills that contain just those items where both sides agree?”

            We tried that. No Republican ever votes for one of those bills.

            If the Republicans would play ball in Congress, Congress would be able to oversee (and constrain) the actions of the president.

            You can have oversight of the president, or a paralyzed congress – but not both. The Republicans work very hard to ensure that Congress remains paralyzed, so they clearly prefer to cede their power to Biden.

          • 0 avatar
            Bike

            All due respect to the GOP, butthe real Art Vandalay, a learned man of culture and sophistication, would never hold these views. May I add too, Art would never pretend to be someone else, like you are doing here.

          • 0 avatar
            Bike

            All due respect to the GOP, butthe real Art Vandalay, a learned man of culture and sophistication, would never hold these views. May I add too, Art would never pretend to be someone else, like you are doing here.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The real Art Vandelay would be focused on his latex production facility.

            Who are you again?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      North Carolina has lithium, so would benefit from this.

      https://piedmontlithium.com/

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    We’ve just seen first hand what happens when we deal too much with corrupt regimes like Russia. China is much worse because of the size of their GDP which “we” allowed to happen. Stimulating EV development and mining of resources shifts dependence on China and unstable oil supplies. People are tired of their children spilling blood and dying on foreign soil for what lies under that soil.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Naa…they really arent. We spent about 20 years fighting the last war. For about the last 19 and a half the only people that cared were the folks that were there and their immediate families. Thats not enough to change policy.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “localized battery production”

    Well, that’s open to interpretation.

    Cobalt – the elephant in the room – is already being reduced to zero in some cases, like Tesla’s LFP batteries out of China – and soon the US.

    But Tesla has had a Gigafactory locally producing batteries since 2014. Will they get some credit for that, or does this money only reward unionized laggards?

    This seems like an abuse of the Act. I’d like to know who’s promoting this from backstage – maybe some of the laggards have realized how expensive battery production really is, and now they have their hand out.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I have good money that says Musk won’t be invited to any of these discussions. This will go to the usual suspects, unfortunately likely with the usual results (limited production of inferior batteries that are considered successful if they don’t burn your house down.)

    • 0 avatar
      BEPLA

      Newer 4680 Li Batteries use no Cobalt at all – and the new Silicon Ion batteries won’t either.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      My state (Idaho) has one of if not the largest cobalt deposits in N. America. So I’m getting the fun of watching this play out politically in a very conservative state that very much values the outdoors and has one of the highest percentages of federal vs private land of any state.

      What I see playing out is a whole bunch of white noise that ends up doing nothing. There are already existing mining claims for other precious metals that will ramp up again for cobalt. It won’t be enough. The cobalt that goes through federal land will still not be accessible (maybe a sop here and there, but nothing meaningful) because it goes across some absolutely beautiful country with lots of migration routes and abuts national parks, and what permits they are going to give to harvest federal land have already been given to forestry. There are many calls to privatize more federal land for mining operations in the state legislature but they don’t have any real authority to do anything so nothing will happen.

      That all being said, I don’t think there is a way to create a meaningfully large domestic battery program without some sort of kickstart from government so I’m not really against what Biden is doing, even though it’s a little dubious.

  • avatar
    MitchConner

    And where will the juice for the batteries come from? Coal. Natural gas. Rest assured it won’t be coming in large quantities from solar and the wind from Al Gore’s big fat methane rich backside.

    Just shut up and encourage domestic oil and gas production while signing an order to get the crazies from blocking nuclear plant construction. You’ll cover a lot more useful ground faster.

    Then again, when Biden, AOC, Fauxcahontas, John Kerry, Da Corpse (Pelosi), Da Vulture (Schumer), and Ca Ca Kamala are your brain trust — USDA Grade A stupid like this is what you get.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      “Then again, when Biden, AOC, Fauxcahontas, John Kerry, Da Corpse (Pelosi), Da Vulture (Schumer), and Ca Ca Kamala are your brain trust “/

      WOW fox news has fried your brain

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        And they got all riled up when Drumph was called Cheeto POTUS.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          Trump is still vocally supporting Putin. What a true American.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “ Trump is still vocally supporting Putin. What a true American.”

            Ah yes. And Hunters laptop is fake new Russian disinformation right?

            I love the completely baseless claims that President Trump is somehow in support of Putin. He’s never said anything in support of his actions and there is countless statements against Russia.

            Oddly enough, the people that support Putin are liberals. They love his censorship of anything that goes against the official government statements, they love the control he has, and they love citizens fearing him.

            I’m honestly surprised a bunch of the liberal ilk here have not flown to Russia to help their dear idol.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            Right. Tucker Carlson, big liberal. Madison Cawthorn, classic lefty. Marjorie Taylor Greene, prominent progressive. And of course, the guy who responded to Putin’s invasion of Ukraine by saying “This is genius” and “You gotta say that’s pretty savvy” – and who, when asked if he believed US intelligence reports that Russia interfered in the US election, responded “President Putin says it’s not Russia. I don’t see any reason why it would be” – was such a liberal.

            Burp.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @EBFLEX–Trump’s behavior has nothing to do with liberals or conservatives. Trump’s actions and speech at best are deplorable but close to treasonous. As for Hunter Biden why didn’t Trump’s own Attorney General bring charges against him? If there was information it was the responsibility of the Attorney General to bring charges against Hunter Biden. I am not a liberal and for most of my life I have voted conservative but Trump on numerous occasions has praised various dictators and openly expressed that he would like to have their power. This is conduct not becoming of a Commander In Chief.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “…get the crazies from blocking nuclear plant construction…”

      3.6 roentgen…not great, not terrible.

      youtube.com/watch?v=ocBVLMHK6c8

      (Sorry, there are PLENTY of perfectly rational reasons not to want a nuclear power plant in your backyard. But on the subject of rationality, I’d say using stupid names, or calling anyone who disagrees with you “crazy” doesn’t say much about YOUR rationality.)

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Are any reactors on the drawing board of the RBMK type or going to be built in an area proned to tidal waves? If not history shows there isn’t much to worry about.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @Art–Agree we need more nuclear power but FreedMike has a point that many will not want it in their backyard. The same thing is true with an oil refinery but at some point you have to have oil refineries and mines, you cannot import everything.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @Art:

          The good news is that nuclear accidents are rare. The bad news is that when they happen, they’re unbelievably devastating. Here’s a sobering thought: Fukushima and Chernobyl could have easily turned out to be far worse than they were.

          And then there’s the issue of fission waste, which absolutely no one wants stored anywhere near them, and I’d say that’s rational.

          And let’s not forget fission plants are VERY expensive in the first place.

          I see fission nuclear power as a short-term solution given all its’ compromises. I’d rather spend the money we’d be spending on fission plants on fusion power research. That’s the long term solution we need.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Well if you spend that money on Fission, you get electricity in return. Spending on fusion might get you electricity, nothing or something akin to the Castle Bravo test.

            How about we do the rational thing and spend some money on known tech while continuing research into fusion. But saying we are only going to spend on fusion is as pie in the sky as giving all of the money to Elon Musk and saying we are going to colonize mars. Maybe moreso…we have demonstrated the ability to fly to Mars. Fusion? Same 10-20 years away that it was when my middle school teacher gleefully extolled its virtues circa 1988.

            Aditionally we have fission tech that we haven’t explored as well. Maybe look into that too.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            1) No, fusion plants wouldn’t cause a H-bomb explosion if they failed, any more than fission plants would cause an a-bomb explosion.

            https://www.iaea.org/topics/energy/fusion/faqs

            2) I didn’t say we should ***only*** spend on fusion. You’re putting words in my mouth.

            3) There are plenty of other technologies that can make the current mix of fossil-based fuels a lot more carbon-friendly. I’d have no problem spending on them too.

            I see fission as a dead end. Building the plants is VERY costly, running them is also expensive, and they don’t get built overnight. Once they’re up, you still have the stuff that people have always hated about them – the chance of meltdowns, nowhere to store the waste, etc. And in that space, there’s a decent chance that the fission tech itself will be eclipsed by fusion, leaving us with a ton of waste to deal with.

            (Also, on a personal note, you need to chill a bit.)

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “ Just shut up and encourage domestic oil and gas production while signing an order to get the crazies from blocking nuclear plant construction. You’ll cover a lot more useful ground faster.”

      The crazies (you are being far too charitable) want to destroy American life as we know it. They don’t want vehicles, they don’t want legitimate sources of energy (IE not solar or windmills), they don’t want success, they don’t want people to be independent rather they want total dependance on the government (cradle to grave), etc. They loathe this country (for whatever reason) and want to destroy it from within. Why else would you promote becoming cozy with hostile dictatorship regimes like Venezuela or Russia rather than drilling for oil here?

      They want electric everything (despite electric lightbulbs being so horrible just a decade ago) yet don’t want to build plants that can handle the increased usage. They are damaged people.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @EBFlex-A second term Trump would definitely destroy America and the first thing to go would be your right to free speech. As I have stated before just drilling for more oil is not going to lower the price of gasoline or diesel at the pump. Too much oil produced will lower the price but as what happened in 2020 there is limited capacity to refine oil and limited storage capacity to store oil that is waiting to be refined. Also the commodities market determines the price of oil not the President. Seems you don’t understand commodities and how they are traded. I don’t support everything that Biden does but I am not going to blame him for everything that goes wrong. I do not support anyone who openly admires a dictator and wishes they had the power of a dictator or someone who brags that he could shoot people and be applauded for it.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Also the commodities market determines the price of oil”
          “Seems you don’t understand commodities and how they are traded.”

          So please explain.

          One side on here wants to put the blame of high fuel prices on Biden while the other side puts the blame on nebulous “commodity trading” without discussing the mechanism in which they do this.

          I expect the real cause is a bit of both which is why no one is happy.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @ajla:

            “…the other side puts the blame on nebulous “commodity trading” without discussing the mechanism in which they do this.”

            That’s the problem, there’s no rational mechanism that adequately explains how gas prices went up 40% while the supply of both oil and gasoline increased. It’s voodoo.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            “the other side puts the blame on nebulous “commodity trading” without discussing the mechanism in which they do this.”

            The global commodities market is complex. On one hand, it’s one of the markets mostt easily described by the simple supply & demand model from Econ 101 and, on the other hand, it’s as complicated as all of geopolitics and all of economics wrapped up into the prices of Brent Crude, WTI, and all of the others. It’s hard to describe in a number sticker.

            Here’s a primer:
            https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2016/08/26/491342091/planet-money-buys-oil

            This series revolves around the reporters buying a barrel of oil from a well in the US, and they follow it as best they can through the entire supply chain, asking economics questions a long the way.

            Remember that Planet Money is a podcast, so the audio of the episodes listened to is the best way to take it in.

            But you’re right in one way: those of us who study this sort of thing already know the answer, and those who have no clue won’t learn from being reminded of the answer. The only way to understand is to hit the books — or the pop econ podcasts.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @ajla–Since you don’t understand what commodities are and how they are traded please read the following explanation. “Commodities that are traded are typically sorted into four categories broad categories: metal, energy, livestock and meat, and agricultural. For investors, commodities can be an important way to diversify their portfolios beyond traditional securities.In the most basic sense, commodities are known to be risky investment propositions because their market (supply and demand) is impacted by uncertainties that are difficult or impossible to predict, such as unusual weather patterns, epidemics, and disasters both natural and human-made.
            There are a number of ways to invest in commodities, such as futures contracts, options, and exchange-traded funds (ETFs).In the broadest sense, the basic principles of supply and demand are what drive the commodities markets. Changes in supply impact the demand; low supply equals higher prices. So any major disruptions in the supply of a commodity, such as a widespread health issue that impacts cattle, can lead to a spike in the generally stable and predictable demand for livestock.” https://www.investopedia.com/investing/commodities-trading-overview/

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      It’s ok to turn the channel from Tuckkkker Carlson and OAN. I promise.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Color me skeptical.

    Sounds like Solyndra 2.0.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Good! Let’s bring this production to the States.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Meh, I’d say Mexico. Cheaper but better than China, etc. I don’t really want to subsidize the union kickbacks that Biden is sure to attach to this via strings.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @Art: I doubt Mexican production would reduce battery costs very much, but it would increase shipping costs to the final assembly plant.

        The reason is that batteries have almost no human labor in them. Tesla is consuming about 30 cells *per second* 24/7 to build its US cars; nearly all of that production, assembly, and test is automated out of necessity.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Production of these materials is from mining. The US imports the majority of these materials because the cost to mine them in the US is prohibitive, or there aren’t enough deposits to meet domestic demand. That’s especially true of nickel, cobalt and manganese. The money will go to US mining companies as a subsidy for exploration or more efficient methods of production, but won’t increase the supply any time soon.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    So is he going to bring Elon Musk to the table this time? He does seem to be the only one that can build reliable batteries in this country in any quantity. But he calls Biden old and doesn’t utilize union labor so probably better to bring in the “professionals” that can’t source batteries in any meaningful quantity or build ones that you can put in a garage safely.

    Yeah, lets just say I’m skeptical on any meaningful outcome from this. But his buddies will get some work.

    If he is serious, he will bring in the guy that is in charge of the company that builds batteries successfully. Bet we get some photo ops with the usual suspects (Barra, whoever is running Ford, some UAW guys.). Meanwhile Tesla will keep churning out batteries.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Yay!!! Emergency powers to destroy the planet!

    You’d think if there was any sort of demand this wouldn’t be necessary.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The waiting list for Teslas is over 10 months long. I ordered mine on January, and I’m likely to get it in September. That’s pretty good demand.

      Fortunately, Tesla os the process of bringing two more factories online. Hopefully that will help cut the backlog. The demand is there.

      I’m waiting months to get a Tesla, because so many other people got their orders in first and/or were willing to buy a higher-spec vehicle to get to the front of the line. The demand is there.

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        “I ordered mine on January, and I’m likely to get it in September. That’s pretty good demand.”

        I’d say Tesla’s backlog has more to do with the inability to get components than anything else. Every auto maker is struggling to produce cars now.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          @MB: It’s true that sourcing is a problem for everyone, but Tesla’s shipments jumped last year while everyone else tanked.

          So their backlog is also driven by demand.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Exactly. It’s not “demand” it’s an inability to build.

          People still don’t want EVs in any appreciable numbers.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            Demand means people want to buy Teslas.

            A 10-month waiting list means that demand exceeds supply.

            Tesla’s supply (prior to Gigafactories Berlin and Austin coming online) was about the same as Mazda and BMW, give or take a few percent.

            Do Mazda and BMW have those sort of waiting lists? I’m sure they have some backlog, but it’s not 10 months.

            Also, I didn’t even consider buying a Mazda or a BMW — because Mazda is old-tech and BMW’s EVs are 2nd-tier. Some people love old tech and/or 2nd-tier EVs, but I’m not interested.

            Unfortunately, all of the people in front of me beat me to it in one way or another (many of them by out bid me by choosing a higher trim level).

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Yes. My coworker is about 6 months in waiting for his M4 competition.

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            @Art:
            My order is for a Model Y, which is a bread-and-butter model like the X3/X4/X5.

            The M4 is going for the Roadster 2.0 buyer, and Tesla’s waiting list is longer.

            People who want BMWs should buy them and be happy, I guess.

            But it’s disingenuous to suggest that there’s no demand for EV, because they’re more popular than many well know brands.

            P.S. Failing to make & sell EVs is failing to wring money from a whole segment of people who can afford premium vehicles but choose not to buy them.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    We can all agree, we god rid of a bully as president (Trump) who tweeted too much, and elected the village idiot (Branden).

    I mean gang, in 2020, gas was $2.20.
    In 2022 (so far) gas is around $4.20. (well at least here in Georgia, even though our governor just stopped the state tax to make it a bit cheaper).

    Here is the village idiot Branden, who needs sticky notes to answer questions, instead of permitting gas pipelines, joining forces with Canada and Mexico to increase production, forcing California and other states to allow fracking and expand refinery capacity, trying to help with batter ingredients for a far distant future.

    Let’s be serious, renewables are not prime time. It is why Germany which stopped (idiotically) using its nuclear power plants and relied on blood stained Putin gas pipelines, and betting on renewables, is now struggling with what a cold near future without Russian gas they will have.

    You can not cut off your primary energy sources UNTIL alternative energy sources exist. For the love of God, why is that hard to understand?

    Ahh the idealism of political left running against cold hard reality of needing energy, oil and natural gas, to power our modern economies. But the left is still pushing their agenda, and a senile president is exposed as a bumbling old man incapable of leading. And the second in command is even worse, being incoherent, laughing uncontrollably, or getting mad as Fresh Prince at the slightest disagreements.

    One last thing,

    Average gas prices for presidents recently:

    Bush – $2.180
    Obama – $3.041
    Trump – $2.573
    Biden – $3.271 (last week $4.334)

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @pmirp1 – I take it you don’t realize that the USA only covers 1.87% of planet earth’s surface? Rising fuel prices is occurring in virtually every country on this planet. Blaming it all on Biden is as partisan as it gets.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Lou–While he is at it he can blame Biden for global fuel prices, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, forest fires, volcanoes, Covid-19, losing his puppy, and everything else that is wrong in his life. Biden is far from perfect but at least he is not a Putin lackey.

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      Here we go – global gas prices in US Dollars for select countries for this week:

      Hong Kong: $10.90/gal
      Netherlands: 9.53/gal
      Monaco: 9.41/gal
      Norway: 9.27 /gal
      Zimbabwe: 8.91/gal
      France: 8.26/gal
      New Zealand: 7.41/gal
      Philippines: 5.18/gal
      Rwanda: 4.65/gal
      USA: 4.63/gal

      But that’s OK. Don’t let facts get in the way of a Fox News/OAN/Newsmax argument. Best to keep the mouthbreathers believing that the entire world revolves around their own TV set and that there is nothing else out there. And I’ll wait with baited breath to hear about how “Brandon” has caused gas prices to skyrocket all over the globe. Please cite your sources as I will cite mine.

      https://globalpetrolprices.com/gasoline_prices

      And give the f’n “Brandon” thing a rest. It has been driven into the ground. But there are really no funny conservative comedians that can provide new material so when they found something funny, they rode that horse until there’s nothing left but a pile of hair on the ground. Plus “Brandon” is from last NASCAR season. Try harder.

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        “Here we go – global gas prices in US Dollars for select countries for this week:”

        Your price differences reflect differences in taxation levels, and you’ve cherry-picked those countries with the highest taxation.

        In Saudi Arabia, gasoline is $2.35 per gallon.

        Nice try though.

        • 0 avatar
          theflyersfan

          OK Master Baiter, here are prices from countries with low gas taxes as well.

          Tax info taken from the Tax Foundation (taxfoundation.org/oecd-gas-tax) with the US$ per gallon conversion from the site I cited earlier.

          Australia: $5.86/gal
          Canada: $5.91/gal
          Hungary: $5.32/gal
          Poland: $5.84/gal
          Latvia: $7.55/gal

          And to try to score some cheap points, you totally missed the point with what I posted. Is “Brandon” the President or Prime Minister of any of those countries? Last I checked, no. So, to make my point again, the yapping on the right about Biden having everything to do about high gas prices due to a pipeline not being built or any of the weak kneed arguments given by them come from people who likely have never crossed an international border. It’s higher in most countries because of the oil price shock caused by Russia.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Good. So we are in agreement that gas prices are not out of line and we don’t need a stimulus or suspension of any taxes. Like lawyers…If you can’t afford fuel, a bus pass will be provided!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Is “Brandon” the President or Prime Minister of any of those countries?”

            Someone should check with him, he might think he is you know, the thing.

          • 0 avatar
            Master Baiter

            You’ve proven that the U.S. taxes gasoline at a lower rate than most other countries–congratulations! You have a firm grasp of the obvious.

            “Is “Brandon” the President or Prime Minister of any of those countries?”

            Oil prices jumped immediately after Biden’s election. Explain that please…

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @Baiter: Petroleum prices increased for the same reason that employment numbers increased and the stock markets increased. People seem to forget that fuel prices reduced dramatically during 2020 when the pandemic first took hold.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Too many facts Pmirp!!! The Brandon voters (not the dead ones) won’t know how to handle your post.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Explain exactly how the president controls the gas prices. I’m listening.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Dave M. – The almighty Q knows all. All you need to do is believe. Who needs truth when you have faith.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          You are probably right. I am sure energy policy and perceived future hostility toward the industry has zero effect.

          See…I can do that too.

          While it is dumb to say the president directly controls fuel prices, it is just as idiotic to claim he has no effect.

          Ergo you are all idiots

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Ahhh, another whiff of corruption. Smells like the section of Spencer’s Gifts from the 80’s right by where they sold fart cans. What’s the over/under on Biden’s spawn getting his beak wet with some of that sweet government sugar?

    Regardless of the stated goals of ev battery production, that is not where the money will go. I used to be supportive of single payer. What little trust/hope I had in government got sh**canned over the last 5 years.

    This is why Trump won in 2015. People see money being spent like I spent on Spring Break in 1992 in Mazatlan, but don’t see their cities, schools, streets, sidewalks improve. Plenty of money for Raytheon, Boeing, gun manufacturers, GM, etc. No money left to fix roads, roofs on schools or taking less tax money, when tax breaks go to Bezos so he can fire off another c**k rocket.

  • avatar
    Luke42

    Every EV that’s made means “demand destruction” in the oil market.

    That car will never burn gasoline, and a lot of countries with interests that clash with ours (Russia, Venezuela, Iran, the middle east) are all oil producers. Every EV made is a economic/strategic setback for those nations. I see the strategic argument for encouraging battery production here in the US.

    I also see why people who favor Russian-aligned politicians here in the US would argue against this.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      While this is true, you omit the fact that the United States is an oil producer and petroleum is I believe our largest export.

      Nice try though…trying to imply that if one doesn’t agree with you they are a Putin Stooge.

      I’m all for EV’s…which is why it is so perplexing that when Biden had his big discussion on EV policy he didn’t invite the guy that sells more than anyone and pretty much single handedly made them viable

      This will be the same. He will involve the companies that make batteries with less range and more catching on fire because he is as petty as Donald Trump and doesn’t like Elon Musk.

      He’s not serious about anything other than shoveling cash at his friends. Sad.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Art Vandelay – both sides of the political spectrum on this board are playing the “Putin’s stooge” blame game. Both sides in office shovel cash to cronies and big campaign donours i.e. bribes.

        • 0 avatar
          Astigmatism

          Both sides may be playing the Putin’s stooge blame game, but Russia certainly isn’t. When Russia imposed retaliatory sanctions against the U.S. for sanctioning Russia, the only elected officials they sanctioned were Democrats.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Funding and equipping one side of a war is a dangerous game. People need to realize that you saying “no U.S. Troops will be involved” is meaningless because the Russians get a vote. If they get sick of having their tanks destroyed by US Javelin missiles and start taking action to stop them from reaching Ukraine, then guess what…US Troops are involved.

            I have nearly 3 years downrange in tthe last war we were involved in. You argued that we had no national interest in either one of them. You argue that the US Defense budget is too big. But then you also argue for equipping a European nation in a war with Russia. You can’t have your cake and eat it too.

            I have no love for Putin. What I don’t want is another generation of Soldier to spend a career fighting a while people like you barely acknowledge it is even happeniing.
            Here is hoping that if this one goes down that road that it effects you personally so maybe this time you will care outside of how it effects your political party. Doubtful though. you’ll gripe about it when the other party is in charge and not mention it when the flag draped boxes come home on your guy’s watch but you won’t lift a finger otherwise. Again, 20 years of data confirms this.

            You are the problem.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Art,

        “He’s not serious about anything other than shoveling cash at his friends.”

        That is completely unfair. Biden is also shoveling cash to his spawn, Huntee. It’s not just his friends. But no mention of a cut for ‘the big guy’?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @jkross22 – “Biden is also shoveling cash to his spawn, Huntee.’

          I disagree. Everything looks like Hunter is parasitically living off the Biden name. Nuance is one of the first things sacrificed on the alter of partisanship.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Lou, The incestuous relationship between corporate news and government protects all parties involved at the cost of the citizen. It’s bipartisan. Since they all agree it must be good.

            The laptop story was called Russian disinformation, when in technical terms, it was malinformation from the corporate news monkeys that wanted to keep their snouts in the trough. The corporate professional note takers dutifully repeated falsehoods without question what they’re told to print/broadcast, lest they risk losing access to sources.

            These leaches had to create new words to further rationalize shutting down questioning. Dis/Mis/malinformation. Official sounding terms to delegitimize any backtalk from the 340 million exhausted from the constant gaslighting.

            The best part is that it’s in the open. Anyone can search stock trades of these blood suckers and see for themselves the corruption happening in front of all of us. If only we’d care.

            “Evil is still evil in anybody’s name.”

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @jkross22 – why should the mass media care about someone’s porn collection stored on a laptop?

            Who cares?

            or who benefits?

            Oh yeah, mid-terms are coming up. The right needs one more bugaboo to get behind.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Come on Lou. If that laptop belonged to Donald Trump Jr. You’d be screaming for investigations and rightfully so.

            It is possible that:
            Trump is dirty

            AND

            Biden is also dirty.

            Heck given that we are basically a nation of morons now I’d say it is downright likely.

            But I know…I know. It’s the other guy that is dirty. Your guy is squeaky clean.

            Congratulations…you are in fact the problem.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Art Vandelay – nope.

            Hunter Biden benefitted from his father indirectly. Is there evidence to the contrary.

            Donny Junior benefits directly from his father. Rump’s activities in the Whitehouse benefited their businesses. Donny was also active politically.
            Oh and why should I care if Donny Junior has porn on his laptop?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Is there evidence to the contrary?”

            Maybe we should look into who exactly “the big guy” is and what he was getting 10 0ercent of.

            Yeah, given that we have had the laptop confirmed to be his and the emails confirmed to at least be actual emails, maybe I’m crazy but I think it bears looking into.

            If you don’t you are nothing but a partisan hacks.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @JK: how much did Trumps children and son-in-law receive during his administration? And what were their qualifications. Sorry but your dog does not hunt. There is only one administration in this century which has multiple members who have been convicted of crimes or who are under indictment. Despite all the rhetoric about HRC or Hunter.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Oh well heck…Trump’s family did it, so it’s OK that Biden did too!

            You are all blithering morons and get the government you deserve.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Oh well heck…Trump’s family did it, so it’s OK that Biden did too!”

            Who said that? I didn’t and neither did Arthur. Whataboutism is a republican/Rumpian tactic.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            When somebody says “look…here is something dirty Biden may be connected to” and you say “BUT MUH TRUMP IS DIRTIER” yeah, that’s what you are saying.

            And what are you yelling at me for. Trump is dirty. I agree. I’m not calling you an idiot for saying he’s dirty…I’m calling you an idiot for putting your fingers in your ear and yelling when evidence starts to suggest Biden is a little dirty

            He’s been in DC 50 years? Why would it surprise you? And why do you care so much as a citizen of somewhere else?

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            If trump or his spawn peddled influence and committed crimes, prosecute. If Biden’s spawn committed crimes by peddling influence, which he clearly has, prosecute.

            Arthur and Lou, are you both so partisan that you can’t see the obviousness of this?

            Also, how long will you let trump live rent free in your heads?

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            “If Biden’s spawn committed crimes by peddling influence, which he clearly has, prosecute.”

            Assuming your conclusion is not actually making an argument. And a politician’s child trading off of his famous last name is not actually a crime.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Astigmatism you fncking hack

            Unless someone can show me that Hunter is actually a huge fan of WKRP in Cincinatti and “The Big Guy” referenced in those emails is the station manager Arthur Carlson then it sure looks like he is up to something nefarious that involves his Father (the then sitting V.P.)

            There is certainly enough to investigate the matter at this point. We should probably also investigate who was putting out all those claims that it was all a Russian intelligence operation since that seems debunked.

            If this was a Trump offspring you’d be screaming for an investigation (and rightfully so BTW). But you arent because you are just another jagoff hack.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Arthur and Lou, are you both so partisan that you can’t see the obviousness of this?

            Also, how long will you let trump live rent free in your heads?’

            Investigate away. I don’t care. As far as Rump living rent free in my head… LOL

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            Biden wasn’t the sitting VP in May 2017, when the “10 held by H for the big guy” email was sent. The Wall Street Journal actually looked into all of this when the emails were first made public. “The venture—set up in 2017 after Mr. Biden left the vice presidency and before his presidential campaign—never received proposed funds from the Chinese company or completed any deals, according to people familiar with the matter. Corporate records reviewed by The Wall Street Journal show no role for Joe Biden.”

            https://www.wsj.com/articles/hunter-bidens-ex-business-partner-alleges-father-knew-about-venture-11603421247

            Not sure what you think there is to investigate, but investigate away, if you want to. I’m sure you’ll find Hunter Biden trying to make money on the fact that his name isn’t Hunter Brown, but again, that’s not a crime, no matter how much spittle you end up coating your screen with.

      • 0 avatar
        Alex Mackinnon

        You guys import a lot of oil too. I don’t think the US exports much oil when you consider the imports against it. You barely break even.

        The US does export lots of refined fuel though.

        Services and semiconductors are the big US exports that you guys actually make money on.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      “…Russian-aligned politicians…”

      Whatever.

      The man who’s name you dare not speak would have negotiated a deal with Putin to keep Ukraine out of NATO, which is exactly the deal Biden will eventually make, except that Biden will have caused 10s of thousands to die as a result of his administration’s incompetence.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Trump would have not only kept Ukraine out of NATO he would have withdrawn any support from NATO and demanded NATO be dismantled. Trump owes a lot of money to the Russian Oligarchy and owes his allegiance to them and to Putin. So is its Biden’s fault that Ukrainians defend their freedom or is its Putin’s fault for invading Ukraine? Do people have a right to fight for their freedom or do we just support the invader and tell those people they have no rights and should just lay down their weapons and submit to a tyrant?Maybe that’s what we should have done as a country just submit to everything the British wanted and just say please and thank you.

        • 0 avatar
          Master Baiter

          “…withdrawn any support from NATO and demanded NATO be dismantled.”

          NATO is an obsolete organization that should have been disbanded when the Soviet Union collapsed. Russia rightfully views NATO and its eastward expansion as a threat to its national security. Talk of admitting Ukraine into NATO was the last straw for Putin–he’s been saying so for years.

          If you poke a bear in the eye with a stick, don’t be surprised if you get mauled.

          And maybe Russia and its western neighbors aren’t on board with the Western elite program–a program that includes persons with penises competing in women’s sports, climate hysteria (keep all your oil in the ground) and unlimited immigration from the third world. There’s certainly no love lost between the Hungarys and Polands of the world and the European Union.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            So are you saying that the NATO should be dissolved and Putin should be allowed to invade any country that he wants especially if his goal is to put back the former Soviet Union? Do you even know why NATO was created? Should a dictator determine what a free independent nation can do? Putin is a dictator.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            How is NATO a threat to Russian security? NATO does not have the conventional military capacity to threaten Russia. And NATO as demonstrated will not risk a nuclear war.

            Putin used the very same excuses to invade Ukraine as Hitler used to invade Poland.

            It is amazing how ‘right wingers’ in the USA have now displaced the far left as the ‘useful idiots’ of Russian disinformation. But then it appears that many of the far right in the USA would prefer to see their democratic governmental institutions replaced by a ‘strong man autocracy’.

          • 0 avatar
            Astigmatism

            It’s amazing how quickly “America First” morphed into “I will happily adopt and regurgitate the positions of a country that is literally killing people because they wanted to be allies of America.”

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            So are you saying that the NATO should be dissolved and Putin should be allowed to invade any country that he wants especially if his goal is to put back the former Soviet Union? Do you even know why NATO was created? Should a dictator determine what a free independent nation can do? Putin is a dictator. You could always join Putin.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            So I am old enough to remember when Democrats were convinced Ronald Reagan was going to get us into World War III and it was him that was the hothead…Gorbachev was the logical one.

            And you fought him at every turn.

            I don’t want WWIII so I must be a Putin Stooge. From a group of people who think watching John Wayne movies is the pinnacle of patriotism.

            Were Democrats Soviet Sympathizers?

            Let me guess ..that was different.

            Whatever, my time is done. If this all goes south my one pleasure will be seeing how that scared $#!+less look on your face while they ship you or your kids off to war while I watch the world burn between episodes of Beavis and Butt-Head.

            If course most of the big whiners are Canadian so it’s not like you’ll be anywhere near it other than whatever unlucky squad of water purification specialists you send over as “your contribution”

            Yeaaaahhh….you can all gofukyaself

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Yeaaaahhh….you can all gofukyaself”

            Too much RedBull and not enough cannabis.

            LOL

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Art, it’s possible Biden apologists can’t see reality. They’re so gaslit by the evil of Trump real and fabricated that no matter the facts, they’re unable to see their mythical assumptions are just that.

            Russiagate rotted many people’s minds. They believed all of it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Russiagate rotted many people’s minds. They believed all of it.’

            The Mueller investigation did not find direct collusion but the scope of his investigation was rather narrow. Other investigations’ did show direct communications between various Rump lackeys and Russian assets. That same investigation did find several examples of obstruction of justice.

            @JKRoss22 – your comments about this remind me of your antimask and/or antivax commentary. A lot of bandwidth consumed by your claims but nothing to back up what you claim.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “would have negotiated a deal with Putin to keep Ukraine out of NATO’

        That would be the same dud who wanted Ukraine to produce dirt on Biden and his parasitic son. You are giving that orange fool too much credit.

        • 0 avatar
          Master Baiter

          “That would be the same dud who wanted Ukraine to produce dirt on Biden and his parasitic son.”

          That dud also puts ketchup on his steak. What does that have to do with anything?

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @Lou–Reminiscent of Neville Chamberlain’s appeasement of Hitler. We should take Putin at his word that NATO is a threat to Russia and that he only wants to take Ukraine and no more. Let’s disarm free Europe and trust Putin to do the right thing and not invade them. While we are at it let’s reinstall the orange fool as Commander In Chief as Putin’s puppet. Am I missing anything except create a new one party system and call it Trump with directives from Moscow.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Jeff S – I don’t know why the west is afraid of Putin and his nuclear arsenal. If it has seen the same degree of maintenance and quality control we’ve seen with their military, it will all self detonate upon launch or run out of fuel before it leaves Russian air space.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou–I am less afraid of Putin now especially since Ukraine but I am afraid of the zealots who worship at the altar of Trump. Trump is envious of Putin’s power and would like nothing more than make the US his own fiefdom. Never thought in my lifetime that I would have to worry about the US becoming a dictatorship and I never thought that I would ever see the staunch anti-Communist Republican Party become pro Putin and yes not all of them but a fair number of them.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Not sure I’d chalk this up to incompetence. The big guy’s got to get his 10%.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Art Vandelay–I like WKRC in Cincinnati especially the episode when they dropped turkeys from the sky. It was a great show and really funny unlike many of today’s comedies. It would probably not be allowed in today’s politically correct society. Probably say that about All In the Family and Barney Miller.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Agree and would like to see more domestic production of batteries but it will take several years. I would also like to see the power grid expanded and more reliable EV chargers. I don’t like being dependent on dictators and the ups and downs of the oil commodities market.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    TD Ameritrade news feed: Ford’s Flat Rock will be down next week due to “chip shortage” according to employee memo per Automotive News.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      And Jalopnik reported another lot in Metro Detroit is full of silly little Broncos allegedly waiting for chips. Although this lots is typically used to hold vehicles that need to be fixed immediately after being built. Typical Ford things

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @EBFlex–You really seem to hate Ford. Did you have a bad experience with a Ford product? Where did you come up with your name especially Flex it reminds me of the Ford Flex.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    On the topic of war and energy, I found this thought-provoking:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/29/opinion/ukraine-war-putin.html

    Excerpt:
    “Suppose for a moment that Putin never intended to conquer all of Ukraine: that, from the beginning, his real targets were the energy riches of Ukraine’s east, which contain Europe’s second-largest known reserves of natural gas (after Norway’s).

    “Combine that with Russia’s previous territorial seizures in Crimea (which has huge offshore energy fields) and the eastern provinces of Luhansk and Donetsk (which contain part of an enormous shale-gas field), as well as Putin’s bid to control most or all of Ukraine’s coastline, and the shape of Putin’s ambitions become clear. He’s less interested in reuniting the Russian-speaking world than he is in securing Russia’s energy dominance.”

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I saw that and thought it was an interesting take. I don’t think the invasion has gone his way to this point but I also feel like he can still win even without a parade in Kyiv. This is exactly how that would look IMHO.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I don’t trust anything about the Ukraine fiasco though I am very partial to the current ZeroHedge headline: US “Doesn’t have Real Information”: Kremlin Rejects Claim Putin Being Misled by Advisers. Without a doubt DC/Brandon are not disseminating any real information to the proles which is standard procedure for decades now (assuming they even have any which IMO is 50/50).

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I don’t believe Putin was mislead. Russian Generals and Putin were too full of themselves. Hubris on a grand scale. They assumed Ukraine would be easy pickin’s like Crimea.
          I’m sure that the calculus leading up to the invasion included securing Ukraine’s costal resources. It also gives Russia better access to the Black Sea. That then gives Russia access to Eastern and subsequently Western Europe. If Russia was successful with Ukraine, Turkey’s control of the Dardanelles and the Bosphorus would come under greater threat from Russia.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “If Russia was successful with Ukraine, Turkey’s control of the Dardanelles and the Bosphorus would come under greater threat from Russia.”

            For Erdo’s gov’t to be threatened they’d have to lose control of Istanbul and the region around it, which will be very interesting theatre should it come about but as of now isn’t in play. Control of both the Dontesk Oblast and the Sea of Azov in addition to providing a land bridge to Crimea allows for new crude oil and nat gas (for LNG) pipelines to ports on said sea. Once the Ukie puppet government agrees to peace, it will be interesting to see what happens to the Erdo government/Rep of Turkey especially since they are already technically NATO members. Oh I can’t wait for Season 2 to start!

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          @28, I usually hop over to the youtube (on my tv) [no cable because my household entered the recession early] and search for “Pentagon briefing” and see what John Kirby has to say (I watch the whole thing). One of the most interesting parts (to me) is to see the questions he gets and how he deals with them.

          What I don’t want to engage in is coaching the Russians online.

          Two general observations:
          a) It is obvious that Biden doesn’t run everything and the people in charge see an opportunity and are working to take advantage of it
          b) The Ukrainians I have seen on video [including ‘recent trainees’] have impeccable trigger discipline (finger in register) compared to Hollywood

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Interesting, though not sure what you mean on “coaching the Russians”.

            A. I agree and this is the case in every major country since at least the start of the 20th Century. I read a quote from Hillary of all people to the effect of, “we [presumably at the White House level] get lied to all of the time and I have the skills to discern what is true and what is not”. I generally scoff at that daffy b!tch yet when I read the quote I thought, “hmmmm, really now?” – since even a broken clock is right twice a day I’m inclined to believe her on such a point.

            B. I’d bet dollars to doughnuts some of that footage are Hollywood actors on a green screen, à la professional actor and El Presidente Zelensky’s communiques from his green screens in Poland or Romania.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          28,
          “I am very partial to the current ZeroHedge headline: US “Doesn’t have Real Information”

          It’s amazing there are still people listening to the people who have gotten most of the last 30 years of foreign interventions wrong. What’s the syndrome that occurs when people who are kidnapped fall in love with their kidnappers? That’s what we have.

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      I understand that under the seabed of the Black Sea is one of the largest untapped natural gas fields in the world. Crimea gave Russia the foothold. Now they want the maximum allowance of maritime open sea they can get their hands on. Plus a lot of Asia to Europe pipelines go through Ukraine. Russia controls them and they can control and amount and price of fossil fuels heading to Western Europe. This is a war over resources, plain and simple. Russia lacks the population to fully exploit their own massive country and they need money and resources now, so look to the west. This has nothing to do with “Ukrainians who think they are Russian” and whatever spin RT put on it before they were shut down.

      There is also the issue of fresh water into Crimea. Ever since Russia decided to cheat at the game of “Risk” and snag Crimea, the main canals that provided fresh water into Crimea have been blocked off in Ukrainian territory. Russia has to find ways to get fresh water to Crimea. Best to resume takeover of the country and blast open the canals again.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Finally someone who is paying attention, if you have not read the late Dr. Brzezinski’s “The Grand Chessboard” he implies as such (incidentally I just read Brzezinski’s son Mark is the current ambassador to Poland). The West has had its fingers in Ukrainian business since the 2000s for this reason and part of the Obama Admin’s 2013 Euromaidan coup d’état was as such. In I think December I read analysis which suggested the Soviets would seek to control the regions around eastern Ukraine in order to later build pipelines to the ports around the Sea of Azov and/or Crimea in order to export to Europe as a Nord Stream 2 workaround – now look at what has been “liberated”.

        Incidentally the Soviets were making claims captured documents showed in late January the Ukie General Staff sent out orders to mass of troops east of the Donbass in order to enter and presumably ethnically cleanse the oblasts. The claims of these documents suggests Moscow waited for the troops to move into position but struck before they were fully operational, and it would explain why a fair amount of ground troops are now stuck in the “Donbass Cauldron”. Since Kiev takes its orders from the West if any of this is true it suggests either another blunder by Western strategy ***or*** was a deliberate move to force Moscow to strike in order to start the conflict. In the second scenario it would theoretically benefit them by:

        1. Creating another Afghanistan and allow the West to fight the Red Army using disposable Ukie proxies and mercenaries.

        2. Divert attention away from the faltering 25 month old Covid/injections disinfo op the West has been running on its people (seriously as recently as January “we’re all gonna die” and now radio silence, so did Putin cure Covid or was it really no longer a concern as of many months ago?).

        3. Allow D.C. to impose sanctions on itself/E.U. since as covered in #2 they are at war with their own citizens (Moscow already found ways around the “sanctions”, see the ruble today).

        Though given recent events around the ruble, gold, and nat gas I can’t help but wonder if this is all kabuki theatre and elements of the West are in league with Moscow – or are levels of stupid unparalleled in modern history.

        “There is also the issue of fresh water into Crimea. Ever since Russia decided to cheat at the game of “Risk” and snag Crimea”

        I’d be remised if I did not point out the 2013 Euromaidan coup d’état was illegal and the Soviets responded by seizing Crimea in order to protect their naval base at Sevastopol the HQ of their Black Seas Fleet. I cannot impress upon you what a blunder this was by the Obama State Department/Pentagon because they had apparently *no plan* to mitigate this response. Although the Crimea is filled with ethnic Russians, even if it was not Moscow could have dropped their own Einsatzgruppen into Crimea and Washington could/would have done squat. The saga of the Black Seas Fleet’s HQ goes back to the 90s and at one point before their lease was up in 2010 there were plans to dredge the old Soviet submarine base at Tartus, Syria in 2005/6 for the deeper draught Black Seas Fleet warships. Guess what happened to Syria in 2006, and guess who started that conflict? Oops. So after winning the 2010 election the Yanukovych gov’t extended the lease but when his government was overthrown and he fled in Jan 2014 it put expediency back on the issue and the rest is history.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_naval_facility_in_Tartus

        One more thing, Brandon as VP is knee deep in all of this and only kindergartners would believe everything that went on there is 100% above board.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      “https://www.nytimes.com”

      NY Times?

      ROTFL

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    It is interesting how this article generated commentary that zoomed down the rabbit trail so quickly. “Wartime Powers to boost EV battery production” quickly moved to arguments over subjects not even tangentially related to begin an argument over the current East European unpleasantness further degenerating into arguments about an international organization created in 1949 for mutual defense against a nation that no longer exists. Arguing about these things doesn’t add much to the original point of the article. When a NATO article gets put on this site or a post concerning the history of Eastern European conflicts, then that might be the more appropriate time to discuss these items. From reading the commentary from this and several other recently posted articles, very few of the commenters have personal knowledge of NATO nor Eastern European history (a few on here do have intimate personal knowledge of these two things that is usually roundly rejected by the chorus. Two or three of these folks actually lived there). Geeze…

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I’ve done enough NATO exercises and other operations with NATO countries in to know that if this is the best the Russians can do, NATO needn’t worry unless the thing goes nuclear…then we only need to worry for 30 minutes or so anyway

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    the difference is that you’d vote for trump again.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Last night’s Cardio Video at the gym (courtesy of ye olde hand-me-down Kindel Fyre) was the President of the United States of America speaking about gasoline prices. If you haven’t watched it yet, you should:

    https://youtu.be/2ppeJgvD9Ac

    If cardio isn’t your thing and you prefer a text version:
    https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/speeches-remarks/2022/03/31/remarks-by-president-biden-on-actions-to-lower-gas-prices-at-the-pump-for-american-families/

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