By on June 23, 2022

Kia

Buying a new car instead of purchasing a used one is almost justified, if one takes a close look at the numbers.

The average new-car payment is now $712. That, of course, is due at least in part to demand being higher than supply. It’s not that Americans are buying fewer new cars than they used to, with sales having peaked at 17.4 million in 2016 and hovering around there until the Covid pandemic hit. It’s that they can’t.

The chip shortage and chronic supply chain issues mean that when it comes to the desire to purchase a new car post-pandemic, it’s about how willing people are to buy what’s available, while possibly paying over the asking price.

The average cost of buying a new car in May 2022 was $47,148, or about the same as a Kia Telluride SX with all-wheel drive and the Towing Package. Conversely, high demand for new cars means the same for used cars.

You might think you’ll get a better deal with a used car, but you likely won’t. Look for a used Kia Telluride and you’ll find that they’re consistently selling for more than MSRP. That’s the case with most models released just before 2020 or after. The Telluride, with its numerous accolades, is the most prominent victim of demand.

But keep looking, and you’ll see that any redesigned Honda Civic, any Mazda CX-30, virtually any car released this decade will be asking for more as a lightly used car. You may soon realize it may make more sense to buy a new one with no miles put on it.

Just don’t spend more than $47,000. I’ll be mad at you.

[Image: Kia]

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67 Comments on “Used Cars Stop Doing What Buyers Complain About: Depreciating...”


  • avatar
    jmo2

    There was a golden age of the used car. Maybe 1985 to 1995 when they figured out how to weld galvanized metal and they had perfected things like fuel injection. Used cars were priced like they were 1978 rust buckets but had in fact had dramatically improved.

    The market soon caught up and used cars started selling for the percentage of useful life left in them. If a car was 40% used up it would sell for 40% off MSRP.

    I’ve been telling people who were set on “gently used” for years they should compare it to the price new. And literally all of them have said the same thing – it’s not worth it. You’re certainly not getting a deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Yes you are better off with new but you might have to order and wait as I did with my hybrid Maverick. Also true about the durability of vehicles but I would add 1996 thru 2013 after that the electronics increased and the complexity has led to a decline in reliability and longevity.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I’m going to take a shot every time you mention your Maverick

        • 0 avatar

          Try to buy one and then you will understand. If I bought Maverick I would be proud too.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            Yes you feel like you won the lottery when it finally comes in after waiting 8 1/2 months. There are some who ordered their Mavericks before me that still haven’t gotten theirs. There are very few Mavericks at the dealers and they were marked up 5k to 10k above MSRP.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Personally I can’t get enough feedback from @JeffS on his Maverick. Am waiting not only for further updates but also for TTAC to publish a full review, from an owner’s perspective.

            Since I still can’t get one of my own, I feel like a proud uncle watching/reading about a favourite niece/nephew.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            He’s happy about his new truck.

            I’m still waiting for mine. Delivery has been delayed for 2 weeks due to a shortage of truck drivers.
            The car dealership says they have 3 shipments collecting dust in a rail yard in Vancouver. They are trying to get GM to release the vehicles and will hire their own freight company.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Arthur–I am in the process of moving. I will say that the Maverick rides more like a compact crossover and less like a truck because of the unibody construction. It is front wheel drive and for most who live in an area with snow it will easily get you safely on most roads. Having owned 5 pickups prior to the Maverick and one 4 wheel drive in which I used the 4 wheel drive 5 times in 12 years so for the most part I do not go off road. For Lou and those who go off road frequently there are better choices so the Maverick and the Santa Cruz would not be for them. I just retired and preparing to move into a smaller place with no maintenance so I do not need a large bed or a larger truck but I wanted something with an open bed that was inexpensive to buy and to operate.

            A few things about the Maverick are that it sits lower for those who want a pickup that is easy to get in and out of and that is easy to reach in the bed. I installed running boards or side steps on my Isuzu for my wife because it was hard for her to get into and even with the side steps she had problems getting in and out of the Isuzu because of problems with her knees and legs. I had a 2 wheel drive Ford Ranger for about a year and it was still too tall for my wife to get in. Also the Ranger was not anymore efficient than the 4 x 4 crew cab Isuzu with the 3.7 I-5 and not as efficient as my 99 extended cab S-10 with a 5 speed manual and a 2.2 I-4. My wife had no problems getting in and out of the S-10 and no problems driving it except for with health issues the clutch was getting harder for her to use.

            There is some engine noise but no more than a Honda Civic or Toyota Corolla but then the Maverick was meant to be inexpensive and compact. If you are not use to a hybrid it takes getting use to not hearing an engine when you start it. When you back up the engine is not running and it beeps. There are no gears in the hybrid so you do not feel shifts which some will not like but it is effortless and quiet. It has a dial between the console to shift which takes getting use to but it does take up less space. Using the dial you do not feel a mechanical shift like you do with a column or most console shifts because it is electrical.

            The seats are decent and there is plenty of headroom. Even with the driver’s seat completely back there is plenty of legroom for me and I am 6 feet. There is an indentation is the back of the front seats to give the rear passengers some more legroom. There is storage under the rear seats accessible by lifting the bottom of the seat up and you can also fold the back of the rear seat down and use the inside back of the front for laying things flat. The bed has groves in it to put 2 by 4s width wise to lay drywall or plywood flat. You can also adjust the tailgate to a 45 degree angle if you have a longer load and want to keep it from falling out the back of the truck. There is also an access panel with electrical wiring in the bed to run accessories off of.

            My Maverick is the mid trim level the XLT which comes with the navy and gray cloth seats and the dash and doors are trimmed in orange with USB outlets and regular outlets and 2 cup holders in the center and indentations in the front doors for larger water bottles. The XLT comes with cruise control, intermittent wipers, power mirrors, vanity mirrors both driver and front passenger, and alloy wheels which the base XL does not and the base comes with black cloth seats. For about an additional $2,300 you get those additional items that are not available on the base XL and are not even offered as options. The Lariat is the top trim and offers wireless cellphone charging, vinyl interior with a leather like feeling and look, Sirius radio, and a few other things. I ordered a spray in bed line, all weather front and back floor trays, and a full size spare otherwise no extra options. I did buy the side window deflectors and front and rear mudflaps from Ford which I installed myself and there are many Ford accessories to choose from for the Maverick. Overall I am very pleased with my Maverick and it is better than I expected. If you decide to get one be prepared to wait and be patient it is worth it. Do not order too many extras that require chips because you will have to wait even longer as some of those who ordered before me are still waiting for their Mavericks because they ordered all the extras. Ordering for the 2022 MY is closed but orders for the 2023 MY opens August 15. The Ford website to configure your Maverick is easy to use and gives you the price as well.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Re: hybrid cold-starts: on the Honda hybrids, the engine, at cold-starts will run at a seemingly higher idle RPM than a conventional ICE motor, and takes a good while to wind-down, even with a decent battery charge, and what makes it weirder is the fact that the engine still continues on what seems like an abnormally fast idle after you put the car into gear! So you’re backing out of the garage slowly, and the engine sounds like it’s running at 3,500 rpm! It’s just cognitive dissonance, if you’re not used to it!

            My question, then, is: does the Maverick and other hybrids all behave this way, or are there any hybrid systems that vary the engine speed when the vehicle is placed into gear?

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @sgeffe–Good point about cold starts on a hybrid. I have not experienced that on my hybrid Maverick but then it is in a garage and the lowest temperature that I have started it has been 30 degrees. I do know that the hybrid system on the Maverick is similar to the Prius so I am not sure if the Prius has a fast idle on a cold start in cold weather. I do know that on my 2012 Buick Lacrosse E-Assist that it did not have a fast idle on a cold start in cold weather but it was a different hybrid system in that it was a mild assist but it still got 30 to 37 mpg which is not bad for a full size Buick. Still miss that car but there is only so many vehicles you can keep especially if you are downsizing to a smaller place but I did make 4k profit on it from Carvana.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Meh…it would.not fit literally anything I have hauled so far this weekend. I was actually high on them, but my F150 supercrew’s 5.5 foot bed required a.lowerwd tailgate and ratchet straps every time.it went out this weekend. A Maverick’s bed would be barely more useful to me.than the hatch of my Corvette. If it works for you though it seems a solid vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          Go ahead and take another shot just make sure it is bourbon and not whiskey. Bottoms up.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I’m increasingly thinking I’m going to arbitrage that waiting period once we get back from this summer’s road trip in mid-July. I’ll sell the Highlander for cash at today’s inflated price and then go and get on the list for a new car at MSRP, for delivery in the fall. As long as it’s not road-trip season, we can live with the Bolt and my e-bike for however long it takes the new car to deliver.

    • 0 avatar
      johnds

      We had a few GM vehicles from the 80s rust away quickly, and a lot of them didn’t get tbi until 89. At least the models we drove. Our most trouble free modern cars have been 4 Hondas with the K24 engine, and my daily is a 2012 Accord 188,000 miles.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I used to be a believer in people holding back when prices spike on stuff they want and people behaving like reasonable, thrifty sentient beings. I thought we were a nation of value buyers on expensive purchases. I thought we bought online because it was cheaper and thought we shopped at Target and Trader Joe’s and Kohl’s because they brought the value.

    Boy was I wrong.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Only idiots buy new. I have read it here for over a decade.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Coincidentally, I was thinking of the Telluride yesterday (Kia makes some fine automobiles — ok they make the Telluride, although this morning I checked the fuel economy ratings on the Telluride and I’ve got some hesitation).

      Anyway, went out to the driveway to fire up my ancient piece of crap (according to some) and can you believe that the birds had crapped on my car? My car!! So instantly my thought was: “You know, I bet if I had a nice new shiny Kia Telluride in the driveway instead of this old thing, I bet the birds wouldn’t crap on it and people would respect me and it would never need maintenance and probably not even fuel and I could finally live with myself.” And then I thought again and determined that I am full of crap and my cars are Just Fine and my Major Problems and Life Challenges probably lie Elsewhere.

      And if I thought some more I would probably think: “You know, if I were Very Wealthy like Art Vandelay, one thing is for sure — I would never fly commercial again.” Because crapping in those tiny little airplane restrooms on a commercial aircraft is not a great experience. I mean, that’s even crappier than riding the bus, or the subway, usually. Because I’ve never seen crap on the subway although Art Vandelay found some — and reported on it.

      And I do apologize for this crappy comment. :-)

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        You’d be surprised how bearable Delta One makes a long flight though. I do try to crap prior to however on long haul flights though. And the crap on the subway is likely a NYC/Atlanta thing.. Can’t say that Ive seen it elsewhere (though if LA had a subway I’m sure it would make the list given the sidewalks). The ones in Tokyo were quite clean. I don’t really do mass transit outside of the world’s mega cities though and I personally daily a 20 year old car nowadays. I didn’t want to pay a grand to decrypt my ECU to tune for a cam. The LS1 has no such nonsense.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “Kia makes some fine automobiles”

        How far in the future do you hail from?

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          “How far in the future do you hail from?”

          Haven’t checked the calendar lately, but Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson is President, and interest rates just slid back below 18%.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The Rock 2024.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            That would make me actually get off my a$s and find someone, anyone, in Switzerland to offer me a job so that I could secure a short-term residency permit there.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            We have done a lot worse than “the Rock” and possibly with those who are grooming themselves to run they would definitely be worse. “The Rock” might be a good President at least he is not as old a Methuselah and I doubt he would have his supporters try to overthrow the Government. I would rather have a good actor for President than a narcissistic tv reality star.

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel J

      I think this is sarcasm?

      I used to only buy used. Then sometime around 2010 I found it cheaper, since I was financing, to buy new. Mainly because 2 – 3 year old low mileage cars plus the difference in interest rates were MORE than a similarly equipped brand new car. That has been the case over the last several purchases. I don’t know if that’s still the case. It might be quite opposite in that used cars are much more than new cars after financing.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    If I had $712 here’s what I would buy:

    – New transmission oil cooler lines for my daughter’s 2010 Liberty – because not all transmission leaks are due to seals (let’s be grateful for that). Plus transmission fluid/filter/gasket. Plus two transmission speed sensors because of the hiccup (4 almost to 3 back to 4) at highway speeds. Plus two shiny new TYC headlights, and parking lights, and side marker lamps, because she’s my daughter.

    – Exhaust gasket material for a Ford Escape (because I wanted to try cutting my own and I can use it next time around with no lead time to order a specific gasket). Plus rear glass struts because I notice things.

    – Touchup paint for a Pontiac G6 (except we already had it on hand because my son’s Malibu is the same color). Plus a replacement vanity mirror and new trunk struts.

    – New window regulator/motor for the Cadillac (that one came out of nowhere).

    Wait a minute, I *did* buy those things — in the past week. And I don’t own a Ford. Nor a Pontiac. What’s THAT about??

    • 0 avatar
      johnds

      $712 would definitely not cover those repairs unless you are using counterfeit auto parts from Amazon or EBay. You’d likely have monthly breakdowns from bad parts.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        I generally don’t like getting parts from Amazon (tools yes, materials yes, supplies yes, parts no). Most of that list came from rockauto.com. I did find the sunvisor (genuine GM, new) on ebay (after looking up the part number on a GM dealer website). The transmission fluid was delivered from Walmart+. Interestingly, amazon did have the TYC headlights where rockauto didn’t this time.

        That total list is $840 with tax and shipping, but I have been/will be reimbursed (and paid) for the Escape repair/parts and the G6 repair/parts (including some plastic welding on the back of the rear bumper fascia). Also bought some tools/supplies which aren’t included (but I enjoy that aspect).

        The “average new-car payment” amount of $712 would hit each month, every month. I’ll still have the parts and tools I bought one time. [Also let’s remember that the “average” car ain’t all that desirable – and we need more than one of them.]

        The transmission cooler lines are Dorman because that’s what was available. The filter and gasket are Hastings/Baldwin. The speed sensors are Standard Motor Products. The lights/lamps/markers are TYC which I have been extremely pleased with on my other vehicles. The window regulator is TYC (window fell on Wednesday, wrapped the opening with ‘crash wrap’ and ordered parts, repaired it Friday). The Ford got Strongarm lift supports; the Pontiac will get FCS (I do not like the ‘generic’ lift supports from Amazon, and they cost more than the brand-names from rockauto). The gasket material is Mr. Gasket 5960 Ultra Seal.

        TL;DR: Believe it or not, I don’t buy the cheapest parts I can find. Real parts from real parts suppliers are quite affordable. Little-known fact: Car companies buy parts from suppliers, too.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I had looked at a 3 used diesel crewcab ZR2’S. They were 2019 models. One had 90,000 km and the other two were surprisingly low mileage around 26,000 km. All three listed for over $57,000. The new one I found has a MSRP of $55,400.
    Used trucks similar in age to my 2010 F150 have been listing between $12k – $22k. The lower price end ones are beat to death.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Wait, they actually built as many as 3 diesel ZR2s??

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @dal20402 – The diesel ZR2 has become a hot commodity with fuel at 2.18/litre even with their being a 10c/litre premium on diesel fuel. The ZR2 diesel gets considerably better fuel economy than the V6. The V6 is rated around 14 city/18 highway (US) whereas the diesel is around 20 city/30 highway (US).

        The only place the V6 has any advantage over the diesel is in high RPM applications like desert running or freeway passing. I didn’t like the low torque high RPM nature of the V6. It’s a gutless wonder at low RPM and the transmission doesn’t have a good reputation. Most blame the transmission for the way the powertrain behaves but some point out a lot of the blame lies with the V6. The diesel/6 speed is more reliable than the V6/8 speed.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I’ll believe that claim about reliability when I see it. Euro 5 and up diesels have not exactly distinguished themselves in that area.

          I can understand the appeal of the fuel savings in this price environment, though.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @dal20402 – the first Colorado’s with diesels did have some emissions system problems with the DEF injector and DEF tank. That’s basically it. A Chevy mechanic told me that he hadn’t encountered any issues with the diesel model but the V6/8 Speed like his had multiple problems/recalls.
            I was leaning diesel more for the power characteristics and fuel range as opposed to fuel economy savings.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @Lou_BC–I have only seen a handful of diesel Colorados where I live and you hardly see them on the dealer lots. I would imagine with their efficiency and capability they are in high demand. Seems to me that GM would still continue to make them even if they are not as large a portion of their sales because they are very profitable. From what I have read the new redesigned Colorado/Canyon will be turbo 4s only just as the current Ford Ranger.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          That premium for Diesel seems relatively cheap! Around Northwest Ohio, it’s about one dollar more per gallon—so roughly $5.75/gallon.

          I imagine it’s pushing $7/gallon easily where the prices start around $6-ish.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @sgeffe – depends on where one buys fuel. I’ve seen parity but 10 – 20 cents/litre is typical in my town. That would be around 39 to 78 cents US gallon. With the dollar exchange of 25% it would be closer to a dollar US/gallon at the higher end.
            If I can get 30-40% better fuel economy, that offsets the 5 – 10% price premium.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @sgeffe–True the premium for diesel is cheap when you are paying $4.99 a gallon for regular. I have not priced diesel but I have recently filled up at Sam’s Club for $4.39 per gallon for regular gas which is less than the $4.99 per gallon average. Kroger Plus Card members can use up to $1.05 per gallon fuel points of their accumulated fuel points for a fill up. You can find ways to save but you are correct in that the additional mpgs from the diesel is overall worth the extra cost of diesel.

  • avatar

    Finally! Kia beats Toyota. I waited for this world changing event 40 years.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’m curious what effect soaring interest rates will have on the car market.

    The housing market is cooling off a bit, and I suspect higher interest rates will chill the used market first, since used cars always command a higher interest rate. That could bring prices down a little.

    But both new and used may see demand dry up a bit if people can’t afford other living expenses, such as houses, gas, and food. Then you have a recession.

    But tight new-car inventory may keep the prices high on used for quite a while.

    I’m just glad I got MSRP/0%/48 on my new car in March. Those offers won’t be around much longer.

    On another note, I’m seeing more “reduced” prices on cars.com that are still higher than MSRP, which means some dealers are scaling back their markups.

    Lastly, I’m shocked anymore when I see a car carrier loaded with new stuff (not Carvana deliveries) – it gives me hope.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I too hope this current economy resets the crazy car market. I’m getting a Santa Cruz as soon as I can find one at MSRP, because there is no way I’m paying over for Hyundai. However since supply is tight even MSRP can be difficult. People are ordering vehicles and waiting months for them to arrive. Due to lack of patients (thanks Amazon Prime) people are will paying more for used cars since they can drive one home today and impress the neighbors with their “new” car. If you have a 2 to 4 year car it is likely worth as much or MORE then you bought it for… that is unheard of.

      • 0 avatar
        redgolf

        “If you have a 2 to 4 year car it is likely worth as much or MORE then you bought it for”
        That’s exactly why I bought my leased 2020 Equinox, with 3 months left on a 3 year 30k mile lease I have only 19,200 miles on it, garage kept still looks new, turning it in was a no brainer since its value is worth much more than the end of lease pay off! I won’t have the 3 year bumper to bumper warranty however the dealer does offer in writing a “lifetime power train warranty” for what ever that’s worth. ;-)

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Congrats. Anyone who has a lease ending today should be doing exactly what you did. It’s probably a windfall of several thousand dollars.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @redgolf:

          I lease, and invariably part of the pitch for doing so is “if the car’s worth more than the buyout, it’s your money”. I always rolled my eyes at that one. Glad it worked for you!

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I have leased in the past, but typically it is because I want the car to go away when the warranty goes away. BMW, Alfa, FCA typically. I leased.a Fiesta ST because I wanted to beat the crap out of it for 2 years and then get a Mk. VIII but Ford blew that one for me.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    What is all of this doing to leasing? Has the equation changed on that? If you’re paying for depreciation, and there isn’t much, I’m wondering if leasing has been taken off of the table for some carmakers. I made $500 on the cursed VW after 16 months and 19,000 miles. So what would a 2 year lease cost now? On the local news, I’m not seeing the lease specials advertised as much.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Leasing has been taken off for some models such as the Maverick. I think with a vehicle shortage the manufactures are selling everything they make so there is no need to offer leases.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I would think that since leasing is a function of residual value, and residual value is clearly going up, the impact might be positive.

      Then again, we also have the offsetting factors of higher interest rates and fewer discounts.

      My guess? It’s a wash.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @FreedMike–True that could change as interest rates become higher and supply of new vehicles increases but for now there are not enough new vehicles and many new vehicles are not being offered with leases.

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    I still can’t figure out why anyone would buy a Kia Telluride and then think it’s a “cool” choice.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I bought my 2016 Highlander Hybrid in April 2019. At the time it had 43K miles, a complete dealer service record, and was on the high end of “Very Good” condition. I paid $36k for it which was roughly Blue Book retail given condition and options.

    I then watched over the next year or so as its value dropped like a rock to about $25k, reaching a nadir in spring 2020.

    Now here were are in June 2022, with the car now having 65k miles and being in slightly rougher (probably the high end of “Good”) condition. Carmax will give me $30k for it immediately, meaning I could probably get more elsewhere.

    The current car market is a very odd place to be.

  • avatar
    AK

    I paid $21,500 for a new 2016 Focus ST… drove it for 45k and traded it in for $19,500 this past March. My new car payment is $217 for 36 months.

    Back in mid 2019, that trade-in value was hovering around $14k. Car was paid off and I was happy to keep driving the thing for another 6 or 7 years to maximize my money spent on it.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      What did you get, and how was the deal on it?

      • 0 avatar
        AK

        22 BRZ, premium (base) 6 speed. Ordered December 4th, picked up March 5th. Paid MSRP $28,955. No dealer add-ons, options or markup.

        Craziest part was that the dealer agreed on a trade-in value in December. At that time, it was valued at $21,600 (Carvana) and Subaru initially offered me $18,000. I knew it would drop by March but 18 was low I so got them to come up to $19,500 and I kept driving the car until the BRZ arrived. In March, the Carvana price had dipped to $19,700 so I felt pretty happy with that trade in.

        Also got a sales tax break on the full $19,500 due to Illinois changing their tax law for 2022. That was a pleasant surprise.

  • avatar
    Don Mynack

    The current used car market has convinced me to not be on the used car market, at least until the recession hits. Better to just sit on the cash unless I really need something. The old Taco isn’t likely to give up the ghost in the next couple years.

  • avatar
    gregtwelve

    I bought my wife’s current car – at the time a 1 year old 2018 Buick Lacrosse Premium from Carvana in 2019 for $24,000 with 14,000 miles. The original MSRP was $42K. (Great car by the way). I just checked Carvana and 4 years later they have a 2018 Lacrosse Essence which is one level below premium with 36K miles for $27,590. Yikes!

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    Just going to hang onto this Accord and enjoy the no-payment in a few months!

    I would still make 85% back on the car if I sold it tomorrow! If not more!

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Random Consumer Update – June 26, 2022:

    Had the vehicle out Friday and topped off (from half a tank) with petroleum; had the other vehicle out yesterday and topped off (from half a tank) with petroleum — because I’ve decided that fuel prices are going UP not down from here and I don’t want to be purchasing gasoline between now and July 4 if I can help it. So there’s $100 that won’t be taking up space in my bank account anymore.

    Was idling at a traffic light (my vehicle burns fuel while stopped – does yours?) and watched a Tesla turn the corner (might have been white, might have been a Model 3, don’t take my word for it I’m not too bright) and did a quick calculation of that vehicle owner’s cost for petroleum and I checked it again but I kept coming back to ZERO and I found that particular number at that particular time to be appealing to the senses.

    He/she probably ran out of charge just out of my sight, but I didn’t witness it. Also the rear bumper probably fell off a few miles down the road, but then again was that the S or the 3? (It was the 3. Was there a design revision in May of 2019? Probably.) 2019 — Wow — Seems like an eternity ago.

    Finally cancelled Netflix last night. Those jokers just don’t know when to stop with the price increases.

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