By on May 23, 2022

S&P Global Mobility has reported that the average U.S. automobile is now 12.2 years old, which it said represented a 2 percent increase since 2021. While relatively modest, the general trend for the last five years has been for vehicles to get older as drivers attempted to milk more life from beleaguered hardware.

Much of this has been attributed to North America’s broadening wealth gap and general improvements in vehicle longevity. If you look back at Department of Transportation data from the 1990s, the average age of a car was under nine years. By 2007, the typical car would see its 10th birthday before scrappage and the number has continued to climb from there. Much of that is due to households having to make do with tighter budgets, which was arguably made easier by modern powertrains that can easily exceed 100,000 miles before needing any serious maintenance. 

The only real difference from previous decades is that there’s usually a period where the average light vehicle age stays put for a handful of Christmases before pitching up again, whereas the last five have showcased consistent, year-over-year increases. S&P Global attributed the matter to the planetary microchip shortage and ongoing supply chain issues that have created a deficit of new product. In practical terms, that means fewer new vehicles for people to buy and elevated prices on both the new and used markets.

Though it probably should be said that S&P Global’s entire existence is dedicated to financial research and the framing of the resulting data. Known as McGraw Hill prior to 2016, the business has spent the last hundred years shifting from the publishing of textbooks to the purchasing research groups, financial service institutions, broadcasting firms, and more. Since 2005, it’s taken ownership of J.D. Power (which it later sold), 451 Research, IHS Markit, and The Climate Service Inc.

The above information certainly doesn’t change the age of your average automobile. But it may help explain why S&P Global is focused almost exclusively on supply problems when there are numerous financial factors contributing to the issue.

“People do value their vehicles; people do still feel the need to have a vehicle available to them, maybe even more coming out of the pandemic, so that’s caused the vehicle fleet just to grow a little bit,” Todd Campau, automotive aftermarket practice lead for S&P Global, told Automotive News. “And because the new-vehicle sales haven’t been available, it’s been growing from within really from vehicles that have been on the road, and they’re just staying available longer.”

From AN:

The research shows the average age of vehicles has been increasing since 2011, highlighting a trend in popularity of older and higher-mileage vehicles. Data from a Cox Automotive analysis shows that the sale of high-mileage vehicles grew 7 percent in the first quarter of 2022. Previously, vehicles with over 150,000 miles were often deemed unqualified for retail sale and were instead sent to auction to be purchased by independent dealers.

The U.S. vehicle fleet — which includes all light cars and trucks — increased by 3.5 million vehicles to a total of 283 million in 2022, according to S&P Global.

The statement said a continued decline in vehicle scrappage and a flux in demand for used vehicles have contributed to the increase in vehicle age. Vehicle miles also returned to pre-pandemic levels, according to the study, “increasing by more than 10 percent in 2021 as lockdowns eased and people returned to work and leisure travel,” with each light vehicle averaging 12,300 miles in 2021.

That certainly hits close to home. Your author recently took possession of a two-decade-old Toyota Corolla in truly rough shape because the price was right and I wanted to minimize the burden placed upon my other vehicles. But this only happened due to the current state of the market. Had MSRPs and availability remained normal, I’d never have held off on purchasing a new model. Instead, I am now attempting to wait out the market while the cost of literally everything else goes up in the hopes I’m not the first to flinch. Though I would wager this situation (and worse) have become increasingly normal scenarios for average Americans.

So cars are absolutely getting older — with one exception. According to S&P Global, electric vehicles actually saw a decrease in their average lifespan vs last year. Data shows the total number of battery-electric vehicles in operation has increased nearly 40 percent to 1.44 million in 2022, with the average age decreasing to 3.8 years from the previous annum’s 3.9.

“It’s a function of the fact that right now, the share of new EVs being sold each year is such a large share of the overall [EV] population,” Campau concluded.

With fuel prices exploding, EV sales have been on the rise. This matter is further aided by the kind of people buying electrics typically having fatter wallets than their gasoline-dependent counterparts. However, their pace may also endure a few setbacks as energy prices are poised to increase in general. Thus far, most data shows residential electricity prices have increased by between 4 and 11 percent (depending on location) over the last year. But just about every market analysis conducted since the start of 2022 suggests things will worsen throughout the summer. That’s true whether we’re talking about natural gas, gasoline, electricity, or diesel — the latter of which is presumed to see massive shortages going into the fall.

“I think there’s definitely going to be upward pressure on average age through probably 2024, maybe even ’25,” Campau said. “Then I think it will level off once the new-vehicle supply starts to catch up with demand. There’s even a potential, I think, that we could see average age maybe even come down slightly … when that pent-up demand for new vehicles is released.”

[Image: Alex Millauer/Shutterstock]

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76 Comments on “Average Age of U.S. Light Vehicles Older Than Ever...”


  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Guess I’m an influencer. Ha. My new ride is 27 years old. I miss the 40 mags of my civic. If the predictions of $6 gas are Accurate I’m really gonna second guess taking the devils money. Easy to see the average vehicle age continuing to climb. The shutdown induced shortages seem to be here to stay and Bidenflation is getting worse with every moves sleepy Joe makes. More and more wage earners are getting priced out of the new or even lightly used market.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Gee, it’s almost like the president has no control over fuel prices. Imagine that!

      • 0 avatar
        kcflyer

        So we are just going to pretend Biden’s trillions in spending had nothing to do with the 30 to 40 percent increase in used car prices. Right then.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Don’t take it from me…take it from oil producers. Only 11% said the government is behind the higher prices.

          “Slightly over half—59 percent—of executives believe investor pressure to maintain capital discipline is the primary reason that publicly traded oil producers are restraining growth despite high oil prices. Fifteen percent of executives said “other,” and 11 percent note environmental, social and governance issues. For respondents who said “other,” the primary reasons were personnel shortages, limited availability of equipment and supply-chain issues. An additional reason cited was uncertainty regarding future oil prices and whether they would stay high. Some felt that a combination of reasons is equally responsible for driving restraint.”

          https://www.dallasfed.org/research/surveys/des/2022/2201.aspx#tab-questions

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            Come on, FreedMike, don’t refute good old internet misinformation with facts and common sense! There are a handful of trolls on here who might get their malicious little feelings hurt, and we don’t want to do that to them, now, do we?

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “So we are just going to pretend Biden’s trillions in spending had nothing to do with the 30 to 40 percent increase in used car prices. Right then.”

          Correct. Nothing bad is Xiden’s fault.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Man, Trump must have been some kind of President because to hear you guys tell it not only did his policies effect everything (negatively of course) l, but even since he has left office they continue to do so and prevent Biden from doing anything.

        Seriously, can we stop pretending government policy has no effect on the economy?

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “Man, Trump must have been some kind of President because to hear you guys tell it not only did his policies effect everything (negatively of course) l, but even since he has left office they continue to do so and prevent Biden from doing anything.”

          I would have never guessed FreedMike would argue that Xiden is an empty suit who does nothing but here we are. On the flip side, FreedMike is also arguing that President Trump was wildly influential, could get anything done, and is still in control because of everything bad going on.

          What a paradigm.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “Gee, it’s almost like the president has no control over fuel prices. Imagine that!”

        Right. YOu want us to believe that he has influence over the price of beef, brats, pop, ketchup etc but not gas prices?

        Do you people even hear yourselves?

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        “When it comes to the gas prices, we’re going through an incredible transition that is taking place that, God willing, when it’s over, we’ll be stronger and the world will be stronger and less reliant on fossil fuels when this is over”

        – Joe Biden in Japan

        So he is at least OK with the prices as they are.

        As his remarks continued Biden claimed that rather than increasing the price of gas, had actually been able to “keep it from getting worse — and it’s bad.”

        So it would seem that Joe Biden is either lying or he at least believes that he has done things to effect the price of gas.

        So who should I believe…@Freedmike, or Joe Biden. hmmm…

        BLUF – Joe Biden believes his polices effect gas prices contrary to what internet “experts” claim.

        I’ll wait for your “something something but muh Trump” response.

        • 0 avatar
          285exp

          Well, since this is Obama’s third term, what should we have expected? Obama said that under his policies, the price of energy would necessarily skyrocket. Steven Chu, his Energy Secretary, said that he hoped to see gas prices reach European levels. Looks like things are going as planned.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Who sets gas prices at the pump?
      Oil company executives, who are ALL Republicans.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        “Who sets gas prices at the pump?
        Oil company executives, who are ALL Republicans.”

        Evidence is growing that political fights and covid have eroded many people’s ability to reason.

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          simplistic and wrong

          Dems caused the high prices – US was awash in oil and had 50% lower gas prices under Trump – and the gas price raise happened well before basement dummy prez tried to shut down Russian oil

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            The key thing killing Biden politically right now is inflation, which is being caused primarily by higher fuel prices.

            You think he’s really telling Exxon, et al, to make gas more expensive so he can slit his own throat politically?

            That makes no sense.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Look, Biden is a failure, but he’s not running refined fuel markets.

            Look to see how much fuel the US is EXPORTING today compared to where we were 4 years ago.

            Biden could do something as could congress (temporarily halting the exporting of fuel, talk to Russia instead of more giveaways to Ratheon/Boeing, fast track/green light new refineries in the US), but unfortunately politician spines only appear when they’re talking and not when they’re doing.

            Funny how federal lawmakers and our president scrounged together $50b in aid to Ukraine but no money to alleviate our issues here. If only voters hired Big Pharma/Oil/Defense’s lobbyists, we’d be cookin with gas.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “The key thing killing Biden politically right now is inflation, which is being caused primarily by higher fuel prices.

            You think he’s really telling Exxon, et al, to make gas more expensive so he can slit his own throat politically?”

            100%. They don’t care what it does politically, they want to advance their dangerous agenda. That is why he is doing nothing to lower gas prices.

            Plus he is the fall guy. They know he won’t be reelected and are using him as a shield. In one single year he has quite literally flushed this country down the toilet. Every single thing he has done has damaged us. At this point they don’t care, its all about advancing the agenda.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Well lucky for you, there is the city bus

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “Who sets gas prices at the pump?
        Oil company executives, who are ALL Republicans.”

        Citation needed.

        Exxon has a higher ESG score than Tesla. How can that be of they are run by evil republicans?

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        So every executive at every oil company is a Republican? I find that a bit difficult to believe.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      The lightly used market is less of a bargain than the new market and has been for the last 18 months or so.

    • 0 avatar
      Queen

      I’m honestly mystified when people say 100000 miles means a car is reliable… my daily driver has 350000+ and just celebrated its 36th birthday. lol only had to replace the head gasket once all this time…and I just fixed the A/C after being broken for 25 years.

      But then I’ve also had 280000 and 190000 mile cars…. Only 1 of those liked to turn the engine off on the freeway without warning…and obviously I blame Biden for that…

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        That just means it has a ton of miles on it. My neighbor in Italy had an Alfa that had like 400k (kilometers) and I saw him put several transmissions.and a motor in it in the 5 years I was there and barely a weekend passed when the hood wasn’t up.

        My buddies Maxima had a ton of miles and it was probably the biggest pile of $#!+ I’ve ever wrenched on.

  • avatar
    DIYer

    “Long may you run”.

    My current vehicles have 77K, 72K, and 55K and average 9 years old and no issues. I bought them new and paid around $24K for each.

    I think these will run for another 9 years, at which point they will become unreliable. The most miles I put on any vehicle was 220K on a 20 year old Chevy S10.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “My current vehicles have 77K, 72K, and 55K and average 9 years old and no issues. I bought them new and paid around $24K for each.

      I think these will run for another 9 years,”

      This, folks, is how you be “green”. Not by buying virtue signaling EVs that are wildly damaging to the planet.

      • 0 avatar
        Queen

        Ok but have you ever driven a Tesla? They’re really effing fast…And I’ve only driven one of the “slow” versions.

        Though my daily driver has 120hp…as measured in 1986… so just about everything is really fast to me…

        Not really sure why EVs have to be virtue signaling though—I mean I’m sure lots of ppl buy them to send a message, but isn’t that why ppl buy and do most things? Isn’t that what the entire advertising industry is basically about?

        And then I’m no scientist, but there must be a point where continuing to drive an old dirty car is worse than the hit from the embodied energy of a new clean-er one. I can’t imagine the world would would be a better place if we all still drove 60s land yachts….at least not environmentally…

        Aaaand I’m sure the author of this article is about to publish his peer-reviewed decades-long study into the economic, environmental, social justice and global warming effects of the auto industry…. I can’t imagine he’s just some guy who likes to expouse his political opinions with the same tired rants.

        Come on TTAC…there must be a contributor to this blog who wants to start another deathwatch? Or maybe there’s someone who can get back to something like this classic,

        https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/05/hammer-time-the-beater-index/

        Actually…your best bet would probably be to just hand the keys over to Murilee Martin and walk away. Now that guy is a real influencer—

  • avatar
    thornmark

    >>Much of this has been attributed to North America’s broadening wealth gap and general improvements in vehicle longevity.<<

    not so much really

    the real reason is that vehicles are hugely overpriced, pickups are priced like homes in some parts of the country and they were once the choice of working people

    and it's almost impossible to find a stripper

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      Two things can be true at the same time. Vehicles can be overly expensive at the exact moment where people have less money to spend. I would even argue those things typically go hand in hand.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Yep. It must be I can’t afford it. Or we made it so good, they don’t need it yet.

      How about, I don’t want your sh!t?

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Yeah Jim Bob in the sticks makes payments on an $80,000 house and an $80,000 pickup truck.
      What?

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Sometimes I read comments in reverse, so the first line I read in yours was, “and it’s almost impossible to find a stripper”.

      I immediately disagreed. They’re everywhere depending on what part of town you’re looking.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        I like that very funny.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “They’re everywhere depending on what part of town you’re looking.”

        Here in Denver, they are at the Cherry Creek Performing Arts Center and the Glendale Ballet…haven’t been down there in some time.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          Mike,

          “Here in Denver, they are at the Cherry Creek Performing Arts Center and the Glendale Ballet…haven’t been down there in some time.”

          I’ve not been to Denver in a long time. Sounds like a trip is past due. Performing Arts – it’s great how Denver has expanded the definition of art.

    • 0 avatar
      Mustangfast

      “It’s almost impossible to find a stripper”

      I know, I checked both the club and the street and none were to be found. Talk about a labor shortage!

      /s

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The longest I have kept a vehicle was my 99 S-10 5 speed manual 2.2 extended cab which I bought new and kept for 20 1/2 years. I loved that truck and it gave me years of reliable service. Gave it to my nephew in like new condition and still running strong. Prior to that I had a 77 Monte Carlo bought new and my wife’s 77 Honda Accord bought new for 18 years and 17 years. Had many vehicles for 12 to 15 years before. Cars and trucks last longer and with proper maintenance will go for 100ks of miles and decades. Makes sense to keep your vehicles in tip top shape and keep them is like paying yourself first. I did get a new hybrid Maverick recently after waiting for 8 1/2 months but I plan on keeping it at least 10 years. My wife has a 2013 AWD CRV with just 29k miles bought new (she doesn’t drive much not even broken in) so that should last a long time. Regardless of who we have as President or what Political Party has the majority I will still keep my vehicles a long time and live below my means. I am responsible for my wife and I and don’t choose to blame politicians or rely on them to fix everything that I don’t like. I cannot see that I have sacrificed that much by not buying a new vehicle every few years and once I get a vehicle I become attached to them especially if they are reliable.

    With new vehicles and used vehicles being more expensive and harder to get it makes sense to take care of them and keep them longer. It is possible that a number of these aging vehicles on the road are original owners who choose to keep them because they like them and they are dependable.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      You really need to write a blog.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      “It is possible that a number of these aging vehicles on the road are original owners who choose to keep them because they like them and they are dependable.”

      I think your truck example is more typical of truck owners in general. I do wonder if truck owners hold onto all of their vehicles for longer periods of time vs. non-truck owners. Seat of the pants sense is that they do.

      There’s also a lot of bs with newer cars, more screens and menus than buttons and switches. Why would an aging population want a more confusing way of getting around?

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        True I have had a truck of some kind for 36 years and a good reliable truck is like a good pair of shoes once you break them in and get them the way you want them you just want to keep them. Really liked my 99 S-10 and even bought a newer truck to replace it but I kept driving that S-10 for another 12 years more than I drove the newer truck which was nice and much fancier but I liked the old one better.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Never mind the growing backlash against new sh!t, greedy automakers, planned obsolescence, distain for consumers and don’t remind me of the criminal dealers.

    Nah. It couldn’t be that.. If it is, it can’t be talked about here.
    Did I mention the auto aftermarket has been growing exponentially, years before the China virus?

    There’s too much cool old sh!t that beats the pantz off of anything new, and can easily gain value every year vs. torpedoing into the ground.

    Otherwise just disregard. In 49 years we’ll all be chicks.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      While I’m inclined to agree that those are serious issues, that kind of stuff has been incredibly hard to quantify. Most research outlets don’t even bother with those topics and I’m sure that goes double for S&P Global.

      Anecdotally, several people who told me they wanted self-driving cars a few years ago are telling me they’re worried about privacy today. I have also personally had it with planned obsolescence, manufacturers trying to discourage at-home repairs, touchscreens ruining interiors, and connectivity giving automakers the play-by-play on literally everything I’m doing behind the wheel. But I don’t know if those concerns have matured within the public consciousness yet. I believe today’s aging cars are more about regular people not having enough money, though nothing would please me greater than hearing that people were not buying certain types of modern vehicles on principle.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Quantify? Why do you think they don’t bother? Their “research” simply tells automakers exactly what they want to hear. Obviously automakers don’t want competition. But haven’t you noticed automakers weaseling into SEMA? Hell yes they know exactly what’s going on.
        But do they want it spoken?

        • 0 avatar
          Matt Posky

          There’s always an agenda when information is floated under your nose. We always have to take a whiff before determining which parts smell the fishiest.

          Most big research firms and think tanks are on someone’s payroll. It pays to be skeptical and try to disseminate real information from the resulting framing.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          More automakers are moving AWAY from SEMA! Ford and Honda, for two.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Matt true but there is something about having more simplicity that attracts many to older vehicles. One of the reasons I bought the Maverick over some other choices like the Santa Cruz was I wanted an actual dial to adjust the radio and actual knobs to control the ac and heat. I had a loaded 2012 Buick Lacrosse that I loved but I can live without heads up display and a host of other nannies that can go wrong. I do miss the blind spot monitoring the Buick had. I do miss the 5 speed manual in my 99 S-10 but I wanted something newer and the hybrid Maverick best meets my needs especially since I am retired now. I do agree that there are many who cannot afford newer vehicles and out of necessity keep the old one running longer or buy a used one they can afford. As for discouraging do-it-yourself repair that seems to be in everything and that has accelerated in the last few decades. Just had to replace my central air which was 12 years old and had it serviced twice a year. My repairman commented that he replaced a central heat system that had a newspaper under it dated in the early 40s during WW II. He said that was made by Williamson and that was one of the reasons Williamson went out of business is that their furnaces and air conditioning lasted so long people who had them didn’t replace them. Similar to my experience with the central air is my 6 year old stainless steel side by side Kenmore refrigerator (made by Whirlpool) the ice and water stopped working and wires connecting them broke but they are so tight that the only way to fix them is to order a new door for $1,100–still waiting on that door. I have had to replace the flimsy shelves on the doors which have cracked even though I have been careful to not put too much weight on them. I replaced those shelves with cheaper shelves from Amazon which have held up much better. This was something that you wouldn’t expect on a refrigerator that cost over $2,500.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Covid deaths in US: 1,026,670
      Covid deaths in China: 5,213
      You might want to rethink your glib characterization.
      https://www.statista.com/statistics/1093256/novel-coronavirus-2019ncov-deaths-worldwide-by-country/

  • avatar
    BEPLA

    Folks who can afford to purchase $75-175K electric cars can afford to install the solar panels to feed them. If not, the electric bills to power their vehicles are chump change compared to the tanks of fuel needed to power the equivalent ICE vehicle.
    Meanwhile, you can talk age of car – but lets also talk about length of ownership, which is not the same.
    More than half the vehicles sold new these days are “sold” twice by their manufacturers. The first is a 3-4 year lease, eliminating 40-50% of the value – and that person rolls into another lease for 4-5 years. The vehicle is then sold as a lease return/CPO for 50-60% of the new MSRP on a 4-5 year term. So the person who is keeping the vehicle till it’s 12.5 years old has likely only owned that vehicle 8-9 years.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Another factor: the popularity of pickups and BOF SUVs. I’m not particularly fond of either vehicle type, but longevity tends to be one of their strong suits.

  • avatar

    cars are lasting longer, better quality.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      While that’s true up to a point, no doubt automakers are hard at work fixing that annoying “problem”. Your best defense is picking something very popular (and proven) with high production numbers for sourcing used and aftermarket parts if need be.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Denvermike,

        It also helps if you watch YT videos of people with your car fixing the most common issues. I’ve enjoyed learning from others and putting that knowledge to work while saving more than a few bucks in the process.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          For sure, plus endless forums. Thing is you could basically rebuild an entire ‘1992 F-150, K1500, Camry, etc, from the parts sitting on shelves locally right now, if not get them overnight (aside from current bottlenecks).

  • avatar
    ajla

    It would be awesome if I didn’t like cars.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    “The lightly used market is less of a bargain than the new market and has been for the last 18 months or so.”

    Agree the used market is not a bargain but a shortage of new and long waiting periods have made it that way.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    $1000 worth of tools/ramps/floor jack/jack stands and you can save yourself a lot of money. I’ve saved thousands by doing my own repairs. The Kid is now on the tools, too, and doing well with his 2000 Sierra 4X4. Just this weekend I did an oil change on my 2007 CTS-V and got the fourth O2 sensor swapped out in The Herself’s 2003 4Runner. Rotors; brake pads; evap systems; signal stalks; O2 sensors; oil changes; diff oil changes; starter motors; plugs and wires; radiators; intake manifolds; MAPs and MAFs; shocks and springs; tire rotations: all done in the garage or on the driveway. It’s dead easy with the right tools. Our youngest vehicle is a 2010 F-150 – and it’s staying that way.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      There are so many you tubers that demonstrate how to repair vehicles even specific makes and models. Very different than it was decades ago. Manufacturers are putting more electronics on vehicles and this will shorten the life of many of the new vehicles now on the market. The mechanics on a vehicle will outlast much of the electronics. Additionally when a vehicle gets in an accident and certain items like air bags need to be replaced the insurance companies are more likely to total a vehicle than pay to fix it. I have been in several salvage yards that have vehicles that are a few years old and that have very little body damage but were probably totaled by the insurance companies. Many totaled vehicles are bought by re builders but also salvage yards will buy them as well for the parts.

      • 0 avatar
        revjasper

        Between Youtube and inexpensive diagnostic tools, the DIY has gotten easier in the past few years. Picked up both a Bentley book and a USB/OBD-II cable on eBay for my Toyota. That’s about $100 of information that gives me the same knowledge base and diagnostic tools as a dealership. Well, minus the years of experience, school training, TSBs, and a multinational parts network…

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’m fortunate to be in a position where I can buy a new car if I want, but this market would make me feel like a chump if I did so without an urgent need. So as long as market conditions are like this the 2016 Highlander will continue to serve. Only 64k miles and it just got fresh front brakes and has had all the fluids changed in the last year, so it’ll be good for as long as I want to keep it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    dal20402–64k on a 6 year old Toyota isn’t even broken in. If you choose you can keep that Highlander running at least another 10 years or more. If you don’t need to buy now don’t better to buy when you don’t desperately need a new vehicle. I ordered and by ordering I paid sticker less $500 but that was on a lower priced vehicle that has a much less profit margin. I waited longer than expected but at least I got what I wanted and I didn’t get stuck with a market adjusted price. The used market for the most part is overpriced and I see vehicles that are rusted and not running sell for thousands when in reality these vehicles are on their last leg and would be scrapped if it weren’t for the current shortages. Any truck that is barely running regardless of age and condition is selling for at least 4k. I have seen ads for old trucks with rusted frames and not running with non-negotiable prices for a couple of grand. Late model pickups are going for more than new ones regardless of mileage. Your 2016 Highlander would go for a hefty price especially on a dealer lot.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The only reason I even think about it is that the car has been parked outside its whole life, abused by kids, and so it’s cosmetically imperfect. It’s got some moss growing inside the bottom of the outer taillights, has various minor scratches on the black plastic wheelwell and bumper trim, has several very worn parts in the interior, and has a nasty rip in the cargo area carpet. I’ve driven immaculate cars my whole life and so it’s an adjustment. But you’re right that mechanically the thing is basically like new and there’s no reason to spend a bunch of money to trade it.

  • avatar
    BOJO

    Welcome to the green new deal. We need to keep driving our existing cars because things are changing for the worse and we can’t agree on why. As George Carlin said… there is a big club – and you ain’t in it. Things will get worse until we become less like sheep.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    https://youtu.be/Yxthhkub89c

    (Or old-school alternative)
    https://youtu.be/GvQkl7qa6RQ

  • avatar
    285exp

    My current ride is 16 years old, I bought it 3 years ago to replace the 22 year old car I bought new. I’d still be driving that car if some dingbat hadn’t run into it while it was parked in front of my house. The 16 year old car is worth more now than it was when I bought it. Thanks Joe! I also have a 22 year old truck I bought 19 years ago, and the newest car in the fleet is 8, bought it 5 years ago coming off a lease. I think it’s safe to say I’m helping push the average up.

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