By on March 9, 2022

Toyota Motor Corp. is reconsidering its existing production strategy, citing ongoing global issues that are hindering its ability to manufacture vehicles at a normal pace.

Like most other automakers, Toyota has endured COVID restrictions, supply chains bottlenecks, component shortages, at least one cyberattack, and some new obstacles stemming from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. These issues have already encouraged General Motors to pursue lower output as it focuses on selling on higher-margin vehicles. Though it’s hardly the only automaker signaling diminished production for 2022. Even the National Automobile Dealers Association is assuming 2022 will be another year of extra-tight inventories and wild markups. It’s something the industry was already doing, with Toyota becoming the next company opting to rejigger its targets to account for hard times. 

“We need to examine the conditions before us,” Chief Executive Officer Akio Toyoda explained on Wednesday. “If we do not continue to make sound production plans [as well as our suppliers] this will lead to exhaustion.”

Considering Toyota has already cut its output goal for the fiscal year from 9 million vehicles to 8.5 million, issuing another cut within a few weeks looks pretty bad. But that’s allegedly not what’s happening. According to Chief Human Resources Officer Masanori Kuwata, the company is only seeking to temper its targets for the spring quarter (April-to-June) and would have another update for what that means in the coming days.

I’m skeptical. After forcing staff to work on reduced schedules for the last two years, a lot of automakers have started talking about running leaner. Some have attributed this to their electrification strategy requiring fewer persons on the assembly line. But the general consensus seems to be that layoffs are coming, regardless of whether it being attributed to a crippled economy or some fantastical-sounding business model. My guess is that Toyota’s upcoming meetings will be covering similar territory with Akio coming forward to announce job cuts.

“As the union points out, a production plan that exceeds the capacity of personnel and equipment is abnormal,” Toyoda said earlier in his speech, adding that the automaker was “already at the limit.”

Toyota has already announced that it will be tweaking its management structure for 2022. However, it was fairly optimistic about upping its production targets. Compared to the industry as a whole, Toyota actually weathered the last couple of years rather well and said it was hoping to increase volume going into the spring of 2022. But it’s looking like that strategy is coming off the table.

“We learned firsthand, during times like major recalls, the importance of prioritizing safety and quality above all else and not neglecting the people supporting us on the ground,” Toyoda said. “Together with suppliers and dealers, we want to work together to overcome the current crisis situation.”

[Image: Toyota]

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52 Comments on “Toyota Considers New Production Strategy As World Burns...”


  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Sorry as this posting might not be exactly relevant to this column but I felt posting it in a Posky article would be more fitting than in one by Corey.

    How can I help Ukraine? Resources and tips for Canadians

    Ukraine, a long-standing ally of Canada, is under attack from Russian forces . If you’d like to show support for those affected in Ukraine, below are some of the ways you can help.

    Support a verified fundraising campaign for Ukraine
    If you see a crowdfunding campaign promising help to Ukraine, check it out carefully to see whether it’s legitimate. Look for an association with a registered charity that will have the means to distribute funds, as well as verification in place. Here are some resources Canadian and Ukrainian organizations are sharing:

    • Canadian Red Cross: the local wing of an international emergency-relief organization. The federal government says it will match individual donations by Canadians.
    •Médecins sans frontières (Doctors Without Borders): a humanitarian group that’s been supporting Ukraine’s COVID-19 response.
    •Canada-Ukraine Foundation: a Toronto-based group that co-ordinates Canadian charitable aid to Ukraine.
    •Save the Children: an international NGO delivering emergency aid to Ukrainian families.
    •Voices of Children: offers psychological support to children affected by the conflict in Eastern Ukraine.
    •Come Back Alive Foundation: a Ukrainian NGO that supports veterans and co-organizes the Invictus Games in Ukraine.
    •Phoenix Wings: a charitable foundation that supplies the Ukrainian army with medical treatment and defensive equipment such as vests and helmets.
    •Revived Soldiers Ukraine: a non-profit that funds medical rehabilitation for Ukrainian soldiers.
    •Razom for Ukraine: a pro-democracy group that’s fundraising for medical supplies in Ukraine.
    •Kyiv Independent: a Ukraine-based, English-language independent news media outlet.

    Learn about online disinformation, and how not to spread it
    Being skeptical of the things you see on social media is always a good practice, but especially when bad actors and their bot accounts spread disinformation on purpose, as Russia did during the past two U.S. presidential elections, and will no doubt continue alongside this invasion. Fake accounts might try to impersonate credible news sources or trick search engines into promoting bogus websites over real ones. For the clearest picture of what’s happening in Ukraine, The Globe and Mail has compiled a list of journalists to follow. In 2017, The Globe prepared a tutorial and quiz to help people learn how not to be fooled. It’s free to try.

    Protect your computer or mobile device against ransomware
    Russia’s intelligence agencies have made a fine art of cyberwarfare over the years, and the computer systems of rival governments aren’t their only targets: Regular people and businesses can be victims too. One threat to avoid is ransomware, in which a hacker gains illicit access to a device or network, blocks access to files and threatens to keep them sealed unless a ransom is paid. What does this have to do with the conflict and helping people? Well, if a Russia-based outfit hacks one of your devices, paying them may make the forces attacking Ukraine a little richer. The Canadian Centre for Cyber Security offers pointers on how to avoid this, such as:
    1.Keep your operating system and software up-to-date.
    2.Be careful with any suspicious e-mails or texts, especially if they ask you in an urgent tone to open a link or file attachment. These can be examples of phishing, a scam designed to make you download malicious software.
    3.Make sure you have important files backed up offline, such as on an external hard drive or USB key.
    4.Make sure you’re aware of the cybersecurity and privacy policies at your workplace, and follow their instructions about what to do in the event of a breach.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Sorry, again. I could not delete or revise the above posting. It needs to be cited/acknowledged as it is an entire posting from the Globe and Mail. Therefore not my words.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Arthur–Thank you. We need to be reminded that higher fuel prices and shortages of new vehicles are not that significant compared to what Ukraine is going through. We can all manage this crisis as well as similar ones in the past but to have one’s country attacked is a real crisis. We need to take Putin serious and not just assume he will stop at Ukraine.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I think Putin WILL stop at Ukraine, which has proven itself a far tougher adversary than he thought it would be. And even if Kiev and the Ukrainian government fall, Putin’s still stuck with tens of millions of highly p*ssed off Ukrainians, living in a country that’s going to need a LOT of costly fixer-upper action due to all the war damage. Militarily, it’s like Afghanistan, only the people the Russians are fighting against are culturally similar. I’d imagine the average Russian solider is wondering what the f**k the purpose of this war is. Meanwhile, Ukraine would have to be substantially rebuilt, at a time when the Russian economy is circling the toilet, and all this would have to happen at the same time that tens of thousands of Russians are being jailed for simply protesting the war. It’s not hard to see LOTS of domestic unrest if the war drags on.

          And that’s just to take over Ukraine. If Putin starts eyeing someplace like Poland, then he’s gone from Division II to Division I ball – NATO and the U.S.

          At this point, I think Russia would count itself lucky to just take Ukraine, and luckier still to keep it.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @FreedMike: I think at the very least he’ll go for the Transnistria region of Moldova (PMR) and probably all of Moldova.

            Putin isn’t thinking straight. The scenario playing out in Ukraine was predicted. A bunch of teenage conscripts in obsolete tanks vs. locals defending their home with more modern weapons like NLAW, Javelin, and TB2s. Kids with antiquated weapons that would rather be back home on their X-Boxes vs. guys that may have had their wives and children killed looking for revenge. Putin’s ego is going to send a lot of young russians to their deaths.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            There are only two ways out of this mess for Putin: a retreat that has some sort of tiny fig-leaf face-saving measure or being deposed from office. His army is not going to engage in a years-long counterinsurgency effort against well-armed, motivated, ticked-off Ukrainians. And it is certainly not going to have the capability to go on anywhere further, especially not into the land of hot-blooded Romanians that is all of Moldova west of the Dniester.

            He’s been a victim of his own corruption. The feared successor of the Red Army was exposed as a ragtag force of 18-year-olds held together by incorrectly specced duct tape. The money that was supposed to have built it back into a world-class military was all diverted into London apartments and Cayman Islands bank accounts.

            The best outcome for him is probably a return to the status quo but with formal Russian control of the Donbas. He can’t hold on to more than that.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Putin is in a “no win” situation. If he succeeds in defeating Ukraine then he will be stuck with a mess 100 times worse than Afghanistan. Russians will eventually revolt. A country with a GDP smaller than Canada cannot sustain a prolonged conflict. If he loses then he’s done. Hardliners in his inner circle will slit his throat. That would be globally very unstable. An internal revolt of the masses would be better geopolitically

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            I’d agree with you if it was not for the current clown show we have in the White House. I think Putin is pretty emboldened, and war is causing Brandon’s approval ratings to go up. If he succeeds in the Ukraine I do not think he will stop there, Nor will the US administration mind the distraction honestly.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            @FreedMike,

            Exactly who do you think you are helping with your naive, wishful ‘assessment’? Let’s meet back here in June 2023 and re-assess your prophecy skills.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @toolguy:

            Ok, then, I presume you do have some thoughts here, versus just baiting me for putting mine out there. Let’s hear them.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Superdessucke:

            I’d say Putin’s a bit too preoccupied with the mess he already has on his hands to consider a fight with NATO. Taking the U.S. – and Biden – out of the equation, you’ve still got the U.K., France, Germany and Turkey to deal with if he takes on NATO. Any one of those countries would far too much for the army we’re seeing in action in Ukraine. If the fight with NATO goes badly, then we all know where that ends up. I don’t think “St. Petersburg is a smoking, radioactive hole” lines up with Putin’s “Make Russia Great Again” mindset.

            Besides, Putin’s not the GOP – he doesn’t have Biden on the brain.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @FreedMike–If Trump were President he would not be supporting NATO or any of the Western European countries. He would continue congratulating Putin for a job well done and saying Ukraine needed to be freed from the Nazi rule.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @superdessuke – Multiple presidencies have contributed to the current mess in Ukraine. Rump’s attempt at extortion also contributed to Russia’s aggression. Rump also “outed” a spy that was within Putin’s inner circle.
            As far as the “current clown in the White House”, I’d say that the USA and most large powers have done a decent job of walking the fine line between support and aggression.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            @Lou_BC – Rump released the aid fairly quickly so I don’t really think that emboldened anything. Rump also wanted NATO allies to pay more because those countries were buying massive oil from Russia and he didn’t believe we should then have to pay to defend them from an enriched Russia. That’s why he was putting pressure there.

            Not a fan of the guy but those are things you have to acknowledge and they are documented. As much of a narcissistic blowhard he was, that’s one thing I think he got right.

            Now, if you are a strong anti-Rumper I guess a question I would ask is what do you think President Michael Avenatti would be doing? The porn lawyer was being talked about by you guys as a worthy challenger to Rump. I don’t hate anti-Rumpers but I’m just kind of wondering what kind of country we would be living in right now were they to be the majority.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Superdessucke – I don’t recall having anything favorable to say about Avenatti. Whataboutism doesn’t change the fact that Rump is a bozo. As far as increased NATO spending, Rump was clearly anti-Nato. He was looking for an excuse for the USA to pull out. That would benefit Putin.
            The USA has played the role of global policeman for its own benefit. Its bases all over the world were placed under the guise of saving the world from communism. Various countries did take advantage of that military presence. That’s on the USA not the countries in question.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            I’ve learned that when anybody says “clearly,” that means they don’t have any direct evidence for what they’re saying ;-) Just your opinion/feeling. And that’s cool. You are entitled to that.

            Anyway, what actually emboldened Putin was two things: 1) the reliance on Russian oil by Europe; and 2) a perceived weak leader of NATO, which of course is the United States, as you referenced.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            I mean look. I’m not trying to give you a hard time. I’m just getting tired of people blaming Rump for clear current policy failures. He did not cause the invasion. He did not “soften ’em up.” And he lost by more votes as an incumbent U.S. President since James Earl Carter.

            So the voters clearly repudiated him. And one of the main reasons was to restore our global prestige. Brandon’s Administration has been a failure on this and should be held to account, not rewarded by distraction. Focus!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Superdessucke – “I’m not trying to give you a hard time.” No worries.

            As far as “clearly” https://www.jstor.org/stable/45289836
            “Abstract
            NATO is the most powerful alliance in the world and an integral part of U.S. national security. Since its creation in 1949, every American president has recognized its value and supported the transatlantic Alliance. But from describing NATO as obsolete to threatening to leave the Alliance, Donald Trump has been the harshest critic of NATO ever to sit in the White House. It is important to identify President Trump’s specific views on NATO and how they have changed from his days as a candidate to his position as president. Despite repeated attempts by U.S. and foreign officilas to soften Trump’s criticisms of NATO, the best source of the President’s true position on NATO is Trump himself. This careful study of Trump’s direct statements about the Alliance reveah an American president growing more critical of NATO allies and willing to take greater risks to try to increase their contributions to collective defense. This policy is not working. Instead, the President should pursue a more nuanced and long-term policy to strengthen one of the most valuable elements of U.S. national security.”

            https://academic.oup.com/ia/article/97/6/1863/6384364
            Abstract
            The election of Donald Trump posed an existential challenge to NATO. At the end of his tenure, however, the US president had neither withdrawn membership nor substantially undermined the alliance from within. This article helps explain the puzzle of why NATO survived Trump’s presidency. Extant explanations emphasize domestic factors such as the US foreign policy machinery and entrenched liberal ideology, structural reasons and Trump’s idiosyncratic personality. While these accounts possess some explanatory value, they remain incomplete as they omit one central factor: NATO’s leadership. Drawing on more than twenty original interviews with senior officials, the article demonstrates that particularly Secretary-General Stoltenberg’s strategic responses were a necessary factor in changing Trump’s stance on burden-sharing and helped maintain a robust deterrence policy toward Russia. These findings carry important implications both for theoretical debates on international organizations’ agency in fending off contestation and policy debates on which actors shape NATO by emphasizing the hitherto understated role of the secretary-general.”

            Please note that these are academic papers NOT mainstream media assessments.

            I have zero problem supporting my opinions.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            “At the end of his tenure, however, the US president had neither withdrawn membership nor substantially undermined the alliance from within.”

            Correct. He was saying that NATO allies should pay more because their dependence on Russian oil was creating a great threat. If anything, he was trying to provide motivation to lessen the risks, not undermine regional security to help Putin, as the media narrative now goes to cover for Brandon. I didn’t need no high falutin’ political science degree to figure that out!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “If anything, he was trying to provide motivation to lessen the risks, not undermine regional security to help Putin”

            Both reports explain how Rump undermined NATO which benefitted Putin.

          • 0 avatar
            markf

            “Besides, Putin’s not the GOP – he doesn’t have Biden on the brain.”

            Which is exactly why he invaded, he gives Grandpa Gropes no thought.

  • avatar
    FORDSHO

    Can we use a different picture for Toyota related articles? This picture has been used so many times that I just refreshed my browser thinking that old articles were displaying. Lol

  • avatar

    “Toyota has already announced that it will be tweaking its management structure for 2021.”
    1) I think you meant 2022.
    2)Unlike GM and Ford, Toyota always strives for efficiency. Whatever the faults of their production planning, somehow feel like overpaid and underperforming execs will go on the chopping block alongside labor.
    3) Is Chris Farley glad to be where he is now? You betcha.

    As for Ukraine, who the heck knows with Putin. Iron Mike Tyson’s comment applies here: “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face.”

  • avatar
    RHD

    “We learned firsthand, during times like major recalls, the importance of prioritizing safety and quality above all else and not neglecting the people supporting us on the ground,” Toyoda said. “Together with suppliers and dealers, we want to work together to overcome the current crisis situation.”

    This man is a gentleman, is loyal to his company and its employees, is pragmatic and is planning for the long term. In Asian terminology, very honorable. General Motors, China and Vladimir Putin could learn an awful lot from him.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    I’m interested in Toyota production of Corolla GRMN. When is the onsale date?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I had the unpleasant experience of car shopping today (9 Mar 2022). (My old Sedona is suddenly at death’s door – suspension rust, and some other lesser issues.)

    I’ve learned much from these pages about the market crisis, but it was quite another to experience it first-hand. I’m shopping for a small- to mid-size SUV.

    – One large Hyundai dealer told me on the phone he has 1 new car on the lot – an Elantra with a stick.

    – One dealer has a couple Ioniq 5s on hand, but is charging $2-5k markup on them and his other inventory.

    – One out-of-state dealer told me they are restricting sales to local in-state people, i.e. loyal customers, so no sale to me. They were nice about it, and I understand them serving their community.

    – The Toyota dealer had 4 used cars in the showroom: a BMW M3, a Camry, a RAV4 with 30k miles, and an older RAV4 with 60k miles and a dirty interior. One Hyundai dealer had an empty showroom with crickets.

    – You can’t buy a Santa Cruz to save your life. But I’m trying.

    – Dealers don’t always advertise ADM, so you have to ask, or else they tell you if you inquire about the car. One out-of-state Hyundai dealer advised me of $5k markups, then claimed it wasn’t bait-and-switch because she told me when I called. Worse, she mentioned that Hyundai doesn’t want them to apply ADM, so they simply don’t advertise it. Grrr!

    – A Volvo dealer had the nerve to include $1499 “Auto Armor Smart Shield” in his quote. If I pursue that one, I won’t be paying for that pseudo-markup.

    – “In stock” cars are a myth, no matter what Cars.com or the dealer website says. At least some dealers are kind enough to mark cars as “in transit” if they are not actually on the ground.

    – Most cars are already pre-sold before they arrive. I got to sit in one before the new owner arrived.

    – The Genesis concierge phone service is super annoying.

    – Over the course of 8 hours, I managed to drive only 1 new Highlander and 2 used Santa Fe’s, having traveled around the Pittsburgh area.

    – Cars have gained a lot of weight in the last decade. 8-speed transmissions exist for the EPA of course, but also to get these tanks moving off the line.

    – Price discussions are much nicer when everyone understands that MSRP is the selling price.

    I fear going back out again, but at least my expectations will be lowered. I have a 6-week window, which suddenly seems tight.

    • 0 avatar
      pmirp1

      I think the mindset needs adjustment to purchase vehicles in these times. I have talked to people, including my brother, who when they hear about market adjustments they flatly say they won’t pay a dime over sticker. Well here is the thing, if you want a new car, particularly an in demand new car, you will pay or you are not getting that new shiny ride. After going to several dealers and actually talking to dealers, you will see that is the case universally. Now may be some dealer in North Dakota has an in demand vehicle on the lot for sticker, but most of us are not traveling those distances to look for a car.

      So again, it is the mindset that has to get adjusted to it. I fear the skirmish in Ukraine will not help the situation at all. There will be other supply chain issues as result of Ukraine being offline and sanctions on Russia.

      I recommend you swallow your pride and order what you want market adjustment be damned. This situation is not getting better till 2024 at earliest. If anything it may get worse.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @pmirp1:

        Yes, to paraphrase Benjamin Martin from “The Patriot”: I may not have the luxury of principles (when it comes to paying over MSRP).

        The question may only be how much. Now I think I’d be willing to go about 3% over, which is about a grand at my price range.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Depends how much you want that new ride. If you’re in a situation where your current ride has a fundamental safety problem, as SCE is, then you may have no choice but to pay what the market is demanding. But if you just want new shiny I think it’s perfectly reasonable to say “I want it, but not enough to pay over sticker.” You may not get a car, and that’s fine.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Since I am dumb and poor [as far as anyone knows], let me ask this:

      • Exactly which suspension parts are corroded how badly, and are we sure they can’t be replaced (or repaired)?

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @ToolGuy:

        Weirdly, the body is fine. Primarily, we’re talking about severe rust on the rear crossmember, which also appears in my photos to have a crack. I need to go back under and verify, because I’m concerned that it’s now a safety issue.

        In addition, the rear control arms have heavy rust, but not quite as bad. Overall, every suspension bushing (front and rear) is crusty and should be replaced. I’m having abnormal tire wear indicative of camber issues at the front, so I suspect front bushings or else a very poor alignment done just 6 months ago.

        The exhaust collector is leaking at the woven flex joint (no sound yet), and the steel pipes that feed the rear heater may be rusted through again. I don’t see a leak yet, but there is a smell of antifreeze – maybe from another source.

        The Detroit Axle struts and shocks I installed 2 years ago are junk, so I would replace them with a better brand instead of cheaping out like last time. The rear wheels feel like they are coming through the floor on certain bridge joints.

        So yes, it could be fixed with enough time and money, and perhaps I can do all the work myself. The hassle factor is the biggest cost, since the rest of the car has a lot more miles left in it.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          @SCE to AUX,

          “Overall, every suspension bushing (front and rear) is crusty and should be replaced. I’m having abnormal tire wear indicative of camber issues at the front, so I suspect front bushings or else a very poor alignment done just 6 months ago.”

          Quick and easy suspension [and bearings and steering] check:
          • Slide the floor jack underneath the lower control arm and lift the one tire ~2 inches off the ground (keeping the suspension loaded and all the other tires on the ground).
          • Put your hands at 9 and 3 on the wheel and move [or try to move] the tire and wheel back and forth, checking for any play (also watch the steering wheel when you do the fronts). Don’t be shy – the potholes won’t be.
          • Do the same thing with your hands at 12 and 6 [watch those fingers].
          • Nothing should move much and you shouldn’t hear much. If everything is (relatively) nice and tight, it doesn’t matter what the surface of the bushings looks like [the visible surface condition is not necessarily a good indication of their functional effectiveness in my experience – which is limited]
          • Repeat at the other three corners of the vehicle

          Thanks for following up and good luck with whatever you decide to do.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Background: My spouse’s 2010 RAV4 front suspension/steering Wasn’t Quite Right™ after performing an unintentional Hazzard County-style jump and hard landing over an unfamiliar railroad crossing (I may have been driving during this maneuver).

            With the vehicle on the ground, everything looked fine from underneath. [Using the front center jack point (front suspension unloaded) the struts also wouldn’t exhibit any play.] When I finally figured out to jack up just the one corner, keeping the suspension loaded, the *top* of the strut gave me a distinctive click where it was damaged. Science!

            Now it has new front struts and new rear shocks. Parts cost less than $300 (including the sway bar links which I shall hereafter always order when I am replacing struts). Hassle factor was higher than expected [no room for big meat hands with the rear shocks] but way less painful than dealing with humans at dealerships. Plus I did it when the weather was nice.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @SCE to AUX–If there is anyway you can repair your van enough to last for the next year or 2 I would recommend it. Don’t you have a Dodge Dakota? If so I would hold out for a while longer. I just sold my low mileage 2012 Buick Lacrosse for 4k more than I paid for it 2 1/2 years ago and I am down to just 1 vehicle my wife’s 2013 CRV. My Maverick is being made this week. I am continually getting offers for my CRV but I need at least 1 car and what would I replace it with. The same is true with the housing market I have realtors contacting me but I cannot sell now because I am still waiting for my new house to break ground and rents are sky high. Once construction starts I can have a better idea when to sell my current house meanwhile I will still go through things and get rid of what I am not going to keep and ready the house for sale. I got gas yesterday at $3.89 a gallon at Costco yesterday with the average price of $3.99 a gallon which is low compared to other parts of the country. Costco was lined up with lots of people waiting in line. I haven’t seen anything like this since the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973 and the 1979 Iranian Hostage Crisis. Things will probably get worse but then eventually things will stabilize.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Actually, it’s a 2009 Kia Sedona. There *could* be a way to repair it enough (see above), but the hassle factor is high. I’ll do one last review.

        I don’t recall where you live, but here in western PA gas is $4.35, thanks to having the highest gas tax in the country. $3.89 is a distant memory.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      @SCE:

      Maybe buy something rusty/trust/old/cheap (yes, cheap is a relative term these days) for cash as a stopgap, and then trade it in when this mess clears itself up? Given how ridiculous used car prices are going to be for at least a while, you might even come out ahead, or close to it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @SCE to AUX – I’ve been searching for a new diesel Colorado and it’s been a pain. Most sites I’ve checked no longer show if a product is currently in their inventory. They want you to request a quote. The local Chevy dealer rarely has product on the lot but at least they show “in transit” or “in stock” on their site. The small chain that employs my son won’t even search for a product or put in an order unless you put down a deposit and willing to wait for up to a year. The local Ford dealer has been marking up higher end pickups.
      I’ve also been looking for a new dual sport bike and it isn’t much different than searching for a truck. I’ve found a few 2021 bikes on dealer floors and they’ve quoted me higher prices than a new 2022 from my local dealer. One shop has a $500 discount on a 2021 but that’s on Vancouver Island. It would cost me 500 just to go across to get the bike. I might do it once CODID restrictions lift and visit a buddy for a week or two and ride around.

      • 0 avatar
        pmirp1

        Lou_BC, when it says in Transit, it does not mean it is available. It just means the dealer is getting a vehicle and it is in transit from factory or port. It may in fact be one that a customer has pre-ordered with a deposit.

        That is exactly what happened to my daughter’s Tacoma. I was following it on Dealer web site for 4 weeks. It had the VIN of the truck that our salesman said was ours. But on dealer web site and auto trader it was showing available and in transit.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        @Lou–It appears that the Colorado and Canyon will not offer a diesel for MY 2023. https://gmauthority.com/blog/2022/02/gmc-canyon-chevy-colorado-diesel-production-to-end-in-q3-2022/ GM will only offer the 2.7 turbo.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Jeff S – the 2.7 turbo 4 out of the 1500 will be the only motor. If I can’t get a diesel then the new Ranger Raptor will come under consideration.
          I have to do a review of my retirement plans. All of these inflationary pressures are worrisome. I can retire and return to my old job as a casual employee to supplement the bank account. I might try some working in some remote outposts since the pay incentives are massive.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @Lou–Sounds like a good plan to keep your options open. Ranger Raptor might be worth looking into but if you decide to get one be prepared for a long wait. I have waited 8 months on my Maverick and expect to wait at least another month before it is delivered. Hopefully things will get better but it might take till 2024 before they do. Still waiting on my retirement house to start construction before I plan on selling my current house. Rents are insanely high now.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Meanwhile Ford has discovered that its vehicles are too complex, and GM wants to reduce parts count by 25%. (But pay no attention.)

  • avatar
    BSttac

    Sad to hear that a company worth $200 Billion dollars won’t build its own chip plant to fix it’s chip shortage. Seems they are making too much money to really care about the issue and instead release these ridiculous press statements painting themselves as victims. Its been years that this “chip shortage” has been and “issue” for them yet nothing was done to fix it. I wish journalist would push back and hold companies responsible

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Posky

      I like the sentiment. But we could could direct those criticisms at numerous automakers at this point, if not the entire industry. As for journalist who push back against the preferred narrative, they are often ostracized by their peers before being dubbed problematic. It’s an uphill battle constantly in need of support.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    The wealthy elite of the world are trying to milk every last penny from the rest of the population before the worldwide revolution begins.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I guess Toyota can offer the Hilux in flat green, white or dull grey colour. Might be a big hit in Eastern Europe like the tan one’s were in the Middle East.

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