By on November 18, 2021

Top brass at Cadillac have made it abundantly clear they plan to exit this decade solely as the purveyor of electric vehicles. To that end, a swath of new model names have been floated, including the Lyriq which is set for the 2023 model year.

Now, thanks to internet sleuthing, we may have learned a few more of the names Cadillac has up its all-electric sleeve. They all end in ‘iq’ … except for one.

If you guessed ‘Escalade’ as the outlier, give yourself a gold star. There’s a less than zero chance, after all, the marketing team is going to squander the equity built in that name. Thanks to some snooping of patent documents by the writers at CarBuzz, it appears we will eventually be treated to the spellcheck-vexing Vistiq and Lumistiq.

Oh, and the Escalade IQL.

Your author is all for the return of real and creative names at Cadillac, which is slowly binning the hateful CT- and XT- alphanumerics thrust upon it by Johan De Nysschen after he similarly bulldozed his way through Infiniti and put the letter ‘Q’ on everything. At least all these new Cadillac names evoke some sort of response beyond customers asking what’s the difference between an XT5 and an XT6 and an XT8472.

There’s also something to be said for marketing consistency within a brand (likely part of Johann’s argument for his naming scheme), so having all its vehicles end in ‘iq’ isn’t the worst idea in the world, even if it may cause some tenured – read: old – Cadillac sales staff to wonder what happened to names like Fleetwood and Sixty Special. In that vein, perhaps the culling of its dealer body isn’t such a bad thing.

Appending ‘IQL’ to the Escalade is an interesting trick, one which keeps the forward-looking branding while retaining the good juju of that particular model. Also, your author is willing to bet the IQL is the long-wheelbase version of the Escalade, with the regular variant set to be dubbed the Escalade IQ. I guess changing it to Escaladiq was a bridge too far.

Of course, these are just patents which doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll actually be applied to the rump of a Cadillac. Car companies register trademarks all the time and then don’t use them – sometimes to secure a name while it’s under consideration, sometimes to throw journalists off the trail and have us looking in the wrong direction for clues. That’s entirely possible here.

But I don’t think so. Not this time. Cadillac has used plenty of ‘iq’ suffixes on its show cars, associating itself with that style of naming for several years now. And hey – Cadillac Vistiq doesn’t actually sound all that bad. It’s certainly better than what’s currently on sale, Johann.

[Image: GM]

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63 Comments on “iq Test: Future Cadillac Names Potentially Leaked...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’ve got one that flows well with how Cadillac thinks of its customers: Fuciq.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Failure to embrace the band’s atoried past and carry it forward demonstrates a low iq IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      This brand hasn’t been storied since LBJ was in office.

      • 0 avatar
        teddyc73

        New younger customers don’t care about storied pasts.

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          Or cars; just cellphones.

        • 0 avatar
          islander800

          New younger customers have the memory and attention span of a gnat. If it didn’t happen today it doesn’t matter. They have embraced Henry Ford’s sentiment that “history is bunk”. So sad.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            “With respect, I don’t think you get it – Broughamage was a brand problem, not a brand strength. They tacked on a bunch of gingerbread to fluffed-up Chevys and charging a Cadillac price tag. It.”

            Marketing is a hobby of mine and I think I get it more than the average person. But we can agree to disagree. No worries Freed. But I would point out that…

            ESV = Chevy Suburban

            Escalade = Chevy Tahoe

            XT6 = Chevy Traverse

            XT5 = Chevy Equinox

            XT4 = Buick Envision

            All of the Cadillac SUV’s are based on lesser GM models (all Chevies but one). And there’s nothing wrong with this. It’s true to history. But if you’re gonna tart it up, tart it up right. And at one time, there was no better company at tarting it up than Cadillac. They were the gold standard (literally when the Gold Package was added to your opulent rig). They need to get back to that, and they will be rewarded.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I largely agree, but they still won’t find success because they are at best a second rate faux luxury brand at this point equivalent to Buick. That may be why the most of the product was purposely very different with a little overlap with GMC except for SRX (Theta Premium) and Escalade (D2XX). Now if they return to recycle C-P-C product they effectively compete more with Buick and GMC for 30% more on sticker. Only diehards and rubes don’t see this.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          “New younger customers don’t care about storied pasts”

          Acura apparently disagrees with you given their most recent ad campaign ;-)

          “This brand hasn’t been storied since LBJ was in office.”

          They lost their way trying to get all Euro and chic NYC sleek. I think they need to reach back into that storied past and Brougham things up! We don’t need another CT5-V Blackwing 6.2 6-speed or whatever that no one will buy until they go on BaT as used vehicles 2-3 years from now. They need to bring back the Biarritz and d’Elegance packages to those cushy big SUVs and CUVs, and watch the cash roll in.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            What, they’re going to put landau roofs on a XT6?

            “Going Euro and chic NYC sleek” wasn’t the mistake at all. That was where the market had been going since the late ’70s. Cadillac’s mistake was doing a laughably bad job of introducing Euro-type product. I don’t have to remind you of the Cimarron, but the doing “Euro” treatments on ’80s stuff like the Eldorado was almost as silly.

            Then they tried a real Euro-mobile – the Catera – and it was half-a**ed.

            By the time they brought out stuff that was actually competitive, the market had shifted away from Euro sedans to CUVs, and the stuff they did was hamstrung by cheap interiors, CUE, and Chevy engines.

            None of this is going to get fixed by putting cushier interiors or more chrome on a mommy-mobile.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “None of this is going to get fixed by putting cushier interiors or more chrome on a mommy-mobile.”

            Well, what’s the Escalade? Or heck even the XT6?

            I’ll contend that by far Cadillac’s biggest problem from 1980-2009 wasn’t from a decision to build road boats or grand touring cars or Euro hotshoe cars but their inability to take whatever they did decide to build and make it of high enough quality to get people to stick around.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            “What, they’re going to put landau roofs on a XT6?”

            Yes, and opera lights, whitewall tires, and pillow interiors.

            “By the time they brought out stuff that was actually competitive, the market had shifted away from Euro sedans to CUVs, and the stuff they did was hamstrung by cheap interiors, CUE, and Chevy engines.”

            Yes also. And this is why they need to shift from that direction, hard left. CUVs and SUVs are not sporty by nature, despite manufacturers best efforts to disguise all their bulk. They are about size, projection, and space. So embrace that. I bet you the market would react positively. Cadillac, with its unparalled history of Broughamage, could lead the way.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @ajla:
            “I’ll contend that by far Cadillac’s biggest problem from 1980-2009 wasn’t from a decision to build road boats or grand touring cars or Euro hotshoe cars but their inability to take whatever they did decide to build and make it of high enough quality to get people to stick around.”

            Definitely, but you still have to build a basic product type people want. I don’t think they wanted “traditional American luxury”, no matter how well it was built.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @superdessucke:

            “Cadillac, with its unparalled history of Broughamage, could lead the way.”

            With respect, I don’t think you get it – Broughamage was a brand problem, not a brand strength. They tacked on a bunch of gingerbread to fluffed-up Chevys and charging a Cadillac price tag. It worked for a while…until customers figured it out, and then it didn’t work at all. Why? Because there was no qualitative difference between a fluffed up Caddy and a Chevy. There WAS a huge qualitative difference between a Cadillac and a European-brand car. Same with Lexus, which I think was one of the most serious nails in Cadillac’s coffin.

            Well, it’s the same thing now, just with more restrained styling. And people cross shopping that XT6 with a comparable Mercedes/BMW/Audi CUV will feel the difference very quickly.

            The basic problem isn’t that Cadillacs don’t have enough gingerbread to distinguish them from Chevys – it’s that there isn’t enough QUALITATIVE difference. The fit and finish, the driving experience, you name it – none of it is special enough.

            Until they change that, they can put as much chrome trim and hark-back-to-the-Brougham d’Excess-era stuff they want on Cadillacs, and it won’t work.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            @Freed
            I guess it depends on what you mean by “traditional American luxury”.

            To me that term doesn’t mean opera lights and wood-grained HVAC knobs but it does mean power, presence, build quality, and at least a hint of value. Something like a Chrysler 300 built by Toyota.

            GM almost got it with the 2nd gen CTS. They just needed to bump up the nonV power and the build quality. Instead they went with the way too “Euro” ATS and the way too expensive 3G CTS.

            These days utility vehicles are where the normie interest is so it makes sense to focus there but Cadillac still needs to inject some brand virtues into their products. And, “weird names” isn’t a great one.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Broughamage was the problem – they tacked on a bunch of gingerbread to fluffed-up Chevys and charging a Cadillac price tag. It worked for a while…until it didn’t.”

            Not to completely disagree but the only consistently successful model left since 2000, Escalade, is in fact a fluffed up Chevy with lots of gingerbread for far too much money. Cadillac’s various bipolar moods have tried to see it differentiate from C-P-C in the same period with nearly every other product, hence Catera, Catera Gen II (aka Sigma CTS), later ATS/Alpha, and now whatever the post 2018 models are doing. Their only other very successful product in the past ten years, SRX, was actually an improved Theta intended for it and Saab but Theta itself was a C-P-C product. So how much it is a Chevy with gingerbread vs Escalade I’ll leave up for debate but I think most will agree its not too far off. The duds -at least since 2010- came when Cadillac went off and did something different instead of using existing C-P-C product in some way (with the exception of ELR).

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Copycats; I have a Hyundai Ioniq (1) in the driveway, and soon the market gets the Ioniq 5, then 6 and 7.

    Of course, Ford has been obsessed with “F” and “E” names since the beginning of time, and BMW can’t get away from the use of numbers for everything.

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      Um, Cadillac has been dabbling with this idea for awhile. They didn’t copy Hyundai. To funny. By the way, you actually bought one of those?

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        I just bought out the lease on my 19 Ioniq EV yesterday. It’s been a great commuter car for the last three years. In this market, it’s hard to find a clean 3-year-old car for $13,500. KBB trade value is over $16k, so it seemed like a good move.

        I was joking about the copycat thing, but the Ioniq has been in production since the 2017 model year.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Any news from Cadillac, to me, is background noise.
    I dont care.
    Tune it out.
    They make garbage. My peers sneer at the products.
    It s been like this for 40 years. No improvement.
    Crap products with comical adverts and clown cars. I REALLY love the “400” and “350” emblems on the back lids, staring right at you when stopped at the red light.
    The last thing I would ever do is buy one.

    PS- I do want to try their coffee. Is that Cadillac Restaurant still open in New York City?

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I just don’t get what’s so hard about this. Cadillac showed a bit of promise with the CT6 and some of the RWD concept cars, but then has lost the plot with SO many products.

    Cadillac of all brands has so, so much brand memory and history to draw from, and there’s no rule that says drawing on that history means you have to stay stuck in it. Cadillac should mean long-looking pontoon shapes, vertical taillights, a bit of formality in the styling, and plenty of glitz. You can do that without making a grandpa-mobile. You can do it on any platform—the early G-body DeVilles and the Nova-based Seville are ample proof. I believe a small team could plan a Cadillac lineup, based mostly on existing GM componentry and entirely possible to produce, that would support a huge “Cadillac’s Back” ad campaign and totally set the world on fire.

    (1) Actually put some styling and an interior into the Escalade. Get the Suburban materials out of it so it’s competitive inside with the Europeans, emphasize length in the detailing, make front clips and a rear hatch that actually look different, and resurrect the Blackwing as the top engine.
    (2) Develop a Lambda Cadillac that has effort in it, unlike the XT5. Give it long, squarish styling with a junior Escalade look, put a proper AWD system and the 3.6TT under the hood, and give it an interior that looks pretty much like what Lincoln put in the Aviator.
    (3) Extend the wheelbase of the CT5 and restyle it to be American instead of German. Get the 2.0T out of it; make the two volume engines naturally aspirated and turbocharged versions of the 3.6. Again, upgrade the interior materials.
    (4) Also extend the wheelbase of the XT5 and refresh the interior.
    (5) Drop the 4s. Focus the electric product efforts only on things bigger than a Lyriq. Don’t sell tiny Cadillacs.

    • 0 avatar
      Weltron

      I agree 100%.

      I have thought for years now that I don’t understand what the big deal is with Cadillac, as to why GM can’t figure it out. It’s really not that difficult. They need to knock it off with crap like the XT5, give them actual names, and put some actual effort into the product. And actually give it some time. It seems like they bring out a decent product, and then 3 years later, they drop it.

      Lincoln is a better modern Cadillac then Cadillac has been in a long time.

  • avatar
    cardave5150

    Fuciq is probably the best name ever for the current state of Cadillac. For the electric Escalade, I vote for Escaliq

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    ” I believe a small team could plan a Cadillac lineup, based mostly on existing GM componentry and entirely possible to produce…”

    They certainly could, but the key task would be to make stuff that’s “special” from Chevys. That means spending real money on things like bespoke powertrains, vastly better interiors, and the like. The GM bean counters ain’t gonna like that…not one bit.

    The result of that is stuff like the XT4. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with a compact CUV for the brand per se. And it’s nicely styled, as these vehicles go. But inside, it’s not luxurious or stylish at all, and the powertrain is lifted directly from the Chevy showroom.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Yep, you’d have to spend on some nicer interior materials and more use of the 3.6T engine. Lincoln is doing basically that exact thing and it’s working out pretty well, and would be working out even better if Ford hadn’t punted pricing into the stratosphere. And Caddy has some historical styling cues it could pull out that wouldn’t resonate the same way on a Lincoln.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        You could even do a 2.0T in that car if it’s tuned right. Not all of those engines are created equal. Give it another 30-40 hp, mate it to quick-shifting transmission, and you’ve got a drive train that feels nothing like one you’d get at the Chevy dealership.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      You pretty much nailed it…time and time again GM’s efforts are killed by the beancounters. Spend the extra money and put truly premium materials in the car. Imagine has they followed that logic 20 years ago. See Hyundai GM brass for a blueprint on how to take a bad reputation and repair it. Of course that means spending now for a reward later. This is the antithesis of American corporate culture which says make as much now and don’t worry about the future. And GM is reaping the reward for such short sighted mentality.

  • avatar
    mcs

    They beat the cars with an Uglistiq.

  • avatar

    Qanoniq? Ironiq? Tragiq? Lowiq?

    nice article, why this site is worth checking and has carried on since Robert was here. worse than the nomenclature is the disaster at the top of the tubes.

    billions spent on EBE nonsensically remodeling stores without reason that now sit empty as online is promoted and inventory nonexistent.

    the distress merchandising tanked sales, along with undue demands on retail operations.

    executives paid millions and can’t ensure the supply chain. ridiculous. where is the accountability?

    “If management can’t sell Pontiacs, you don’t get rid of Pontiac, you get rid of management”

    at General Motors the results don’t change, only the excuses. 13% market share. for shame!

    check out generalwatch. haven’t done much with it since Red Ink Rick was successfully shown the door. still 6-700 page hits per day. just crossed 3.5 million.

    not bad for an older fella in Flint.

    Buickman
    Founder
    GeneralWatch.com
    DollingerDifference.com

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I truly want them to succeed. I don’t really care that they’re not naming stuff “Eldorado” or “Sixty Special,” or whatever glory-days nameplate you’re thinking of. In the end, it’s the product that matters. Great cars with stupid names can succeed (Camry), and mediocre cars with glorious names can fail (Continental).

    And considering how badly they’ve dropped the ball in the past, blowing the whole thing and starting over as an EV brand sounds about right to me (well, maybe “might as well blow it up and start over” might be more accurate).

    But what really concerns me is that their opening move in the EV game is the Lyriq. It’s a boring, mommy-mobile CUV with awful styling. Going back to the “it’s gotta have a Caddy name” non-argument, do you really think people are going to fall in love with this ugly lump if it was called “Sixty Special” or “Fleetwood Talisman Brougham”? Nope. They’re going to say, “it’s ugly as hell” and move on.

    Cadillac better have something sensational in the pipeline after that. Otherwise, the next model is going to be called Bankruptiq.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Seriously, those marketing idiots at Cadillac STILL haven’t been fired. When you read these names you can see them in a conference room with a white board shouting out ideas. “Let’s have all the names end in Ick!, I mean Eek!” (either works, in reality)

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      They can hire and fire as many marketing folks as they want – marketing isn’t the problem. The problem is that they have one product with real cachet that sells in volume – the Escalade – and that’s it. I suppose you could say the V-series sedans are no-s**t great, but they’re not volume sellers, and all that greatness doesn’t filter down to sales volume for the sedans they’re based on because the basic sedans aren’t all that good.
      The crossovers are all made-over lesser GMs with cheap-ish interiors and the same engines you’d find in a Chevy showroom.

      And the big brand savior – the Lyriq – is a boring mommy-mobile CUV with some seriously ugly styling details, and it’s going to cost big money.

      How would you suggest marketing all this?

      Jesus could be reincarnated tomorrow as Don Draper, and take the reins of that marketing department, and he’d have one heck of a time selling this stuff.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Cadillac should go all EVs but they should up their overall quality and definitely up the quality of their interiors. Also designing a vehicle that is physically appealing and has the wow factor. Some design cues from Cadillac’s hey days would help. Naming their vehicles ending in iq is kind of strange especially if the names are not easy to pronounce. Calais would be a good name to bring back and so would Lasalle.

  • avatar
    MitchConner

    Moroniq

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Wouldn’t you really rather have a Buiq?

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Titaniq, Oceaniq, Atlantiq, Pacifiq, Tropiq, Republiq, Baltiq, the old White Star Line names stretch to Infinitiq, ripe for the piqkings.

    Cadillac should change its name to Cadillaq. And add the Maniq name for a dash of minor fervor in a Detroit staple, the “sporty” car or truck.

    Or for the perennial happy hour, the Cadillaq Ginandtoniq. Hiq!

  • avatar
    zipper69

    All in all, nothing less than pathetiq

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    With the English language on life support thanks to Millennials and the generations after them I don’t see the spellings of these names being an issue. Look how often you see things like “tryna” or “bruh”. So yeah, not an issue. They have no concept of correct spelling and simply make up new terms. I also find it amusing how Cadillac has been consistently criticized for its letter and number model designations while companies like BMW, Mercedes and Lexus never are.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Millenials? Nah. What about names like Camry, Corolla, Starion, Celica, Sentra, and on and on? The millenials were nothing more than eggs riding in their mommies’ five-year-old ovaries when the Japanese started that.

      As far as “why don’t Lexus and Mercedes get dinged for using alphanumeric names while Caddy does,” that’s easy – Lexus and Mercedes haven’t spent the last 30 years destroying their businesses like Cadillac has.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      “Impactful” – I hate that word. Also how people use the word “ask” instead of question, or request. Like, “That is our ask”. Did these people quit school after third grade?

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I was listening to corporate drones in their 50s spewing nonsense corporate speak (i.e.. “we will drive vertical solutions and sales growth across the enterprise”) while the millenials were in diapers. Nothing new here, really.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    The last person who thought Cadillac was an aspiration brand died yesterday.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      As long as people continue to slap vinyl roofs or fake convertible tops (with a moonroof!) on Cadillacs, it will still be aspirational. They’re not all dead yet – just watching reruns of “Matlock”.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    They died that soon? I thought that was 40 years ago.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    How pathetiq.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Those names are bad.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I haven’t seen vinyl tops in recent years except maybe on cars from Florida. As for Matlock it is a better show than most of today’s shows and Matlock drove a Panther without a vinyl top so at least he gets my respect for driving a good car which is a legend in itself. Much Panther love on this site. More respect for a Crown Victoria, Grand Marquis, and Towncar than any Cadillac at least they are good solid reliable cars.

  • avatar
    W126

    Gimmiq.

  • avatar
    stuki

    I suppose this will mean there will finally be an enitre iq over at Cadillac….

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