By on September 8, 2021

We continue our Chevrolet Citation coverage today, just after the economy car’s 1980 introduction to critical acclaim and huge sales figures. Unfortunately for GM, the Citation’s true personality was quickly exposed, and things were entirely downhill from there.

After it won a COTY award from Motor Trend, the Citation’s qualities became apparent to the press, NHTSA, and the general public. Citation was almost immediately derided for its poor quality, panels that loved to rust, dangerous handling characteristics, and how it would occasionally catch fire. Said fires caused a recall of 225,000 cars from 1980 to fix a transmission hose that tended to spill its contents all over red-hot metal.

The NHTSA even took GM to court given the Citation’s braking issues: Under heavy braking, the lightly loaded rear end of the Citation was prone to break traction cause a loss of control. There were also power steering issues. NHTSA was not successful in its legal challenge to GM, and the case was dismissed.

All of the above added up to a considerable loss in consumer confidence toward the Citation. Sales halved in 1981 to 413,000 cars, and more than halved again in 1982, to 165,000. Each year from 1983 through 1985, Citation couldn’t manage 100,000 sales.

GM continued fiddling with the very damaged Citation and renamed it in 1984 to Citation II. The name edit was meant to reflect a newer, better Citation (it wasn’t) and bring in new buyers. It worked very marginally, as 1984 sales increased around 3,000 over the prior year’s 92,000. The Citation was discontinued after 1985 and replaced jointly by the Corsica and Beretta. Almost nobody missed it, and Citations were largely off the roads by the early Nineties.

But there was a bright(er) spot among all the Citation’s problems, the X-11. The X-11 stood aside from the two standard trims at introduction in 1980. Visually different from standard Citations, the X-11 wore large badging to denote its specialness alongside different color schemes. There were also upgrades to the chassis and engine (eventually). X-11 trim was offered only on the two- and three-door Citations – sorry five-door. By 1981 the X-11 offered a different engine: the high-output version of the 2.8, good for 135 horses. This exclusivity lasted only through 1982, as for ’83, that engine was granted as an option on all Citations.

Today’s Citation example is of course an X-11. The three-door is presently for sale on eBay out of Illinois. Black over tan with a four-speed manual, it looks in great condition. Yours for a not-so-reasonable $10,950.

[Images: GM]

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78 Comments on “Rare Rides: The Chevrolet Citation Story, Part II...”


  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    “GM continued fiddling with the very damaged Citation and renamed it in 1984 to Citation II.”

    Now might be a good time to rename the site as TTAC II.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Dad bought a Citation in 1980, 5-door, V6, 4 speed. Kind of fun to drive, and a good people hauler. It was painted “Champagne”, kind of a metallic beige, and started flaking after a couple years. One day I borrowed it and forgot to set the parking brake, and it gently rolled into an Econoline van. Dad made me split the cost of some very minimal body work and a complete repaint. Couple years later he gave it to my brother, kind of cheesed me off.

  • avatar
    Pianoboy57

    I had an ’80 Skylark 4dr base with v6 and automatic. It was 10 years old when I got it. The previous owner had gotten all the problems fixed so it was relatively trouble free. It was the car’s size that I liked. It was just right and I thought it rode and handled pretty good. I did have a trans leak but an accident did it in at 150K.

  • avatar
    alexVA

    There’s a kind of interesting ’85 X-11 for sale with a stick shift conversion:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/384371631681?hash=item597e55a641:g:8ooAAOSwrz5hMo40

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    That first ad about the interior spends more text on seat foam than any other feature in the interior. I guess if the radio is broken and a/c is provided by the rust holes in the door, seat foam is all you have left.

    I look at cars like this and shrug. GM had to know that they designed this crap, built this crap, and sold it to people who were lucky to get 60,000 miles without the car self destructing. Maybe if they left their little self-contained Detroit bubble high above Detroit and paid attention to what was happening in Japan and Europe, this kind of wretched abomination wouldn’t have been unleashed as a cynical “Hey, we can make a small car” attempt. They should have buried these heaps next to all of the Atari “E.T.” cartridges in the huge hole in the New Mexico desert.

    • 0 avatar

      The cargo/people picture is very sneaky. They have five people in the car but impose the image of all the cargo space with the seat folded down. Sort of implies you could have both if you didn’t think about it.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Good call, Corey. That’s quite sneaky.

      • 0 avatar
        spookiness

        Mid-size 5-door hatchbacks always seemed to be poison to buyers, which was a shame. We had a Lebaron GTS, which could haul anything. Turbo lag and all, it was a great car. One of my H.S. teachers that I was tight with had a Mazda 626 “Touring” hatchback, with oscillating dash vents which were a thing then.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I agree about going to Japan; a trip to Europe would have certainly taught them a little about small car handling and habits, but I can’t think of a European manufacturer at that time whose build quality matched the Japanese.

      The domestic car shitshow that defined the end of the 70’s and throughout the ’80s pushed my generation away, most likely for good. To this day a domestic branded vehicle is of little consideration unless it’s a pickup truck or large SUV. The Japanese brands just completely ate the Big Three for lunch.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    From the ad:

    “Don’t miss this once in a lifetime chance to own such a low mile, best of the breed, original, X-11, holy grail survivor.”

    Not just a survivor, but a HOLY GRAIL survivor. I think this guy needs a job at Sterling Cooper.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I guess they think collectors would be interested. Not sure who would collect these or why, but to each his own.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        It’s actually not bad looking, and as a time machine it’s interesting, but the time it’s bringing you back to sucked. Still, this wasn’t a bad performer at all for its’ day, assuming it stayed together long enough to perform.

        Interesting, but not ten grand interesting.

        • 0 avatar
          SCE to AUX

          Agreed on all points.

          The color and the era remind me of the Buick Grand National – good at the time, but only because it was cooler than the crap sold next to it.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I never got the GN hype either – yes, I know it was fast in a straight line, but it was a freakin’ Regal.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “it was fast in a straight line, but it was a freakin’ Regal.”

            I’m missing the bad part.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The GN was sent out with standard Regal brakes/suspension and priced high enough that hopefully no one would buy it.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Compared to a regular Regal the T-type and GN had wider tires, a rear sway bar, a larger front sway bar, higher-rate springs, different shock absorbers, a shorter final drive, and a different steering ratio.

            You guys kind of kill me with this, the intercooled GNs were running 6 seconds 0-60 at a time when most mass market cars were over double that. I wouldn’t pay $100K for one, but they are cool cars. It also isn’t like a Cobra Jet Torino or LS6 Chevelle were road course kings.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            You either “get” the GN thing or you don’t; I guess I don’t. Mainly, I always thought the the Darth Vader treatment looked silly on a malaise-era coupe that never looked all that good to begin with. I’d actually have been more of a fan if they’d made it look like a regular Regal – with landau roof, natch. Ultimate sleeper.

            And, yes, I know they did some suspension mods on it, but it still wasn’t much of a handler. If I had to have something from GM from that era, I’d have opted for something like an IROC-Z. In fact, I wouldn’t mind having one of those today.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “I’d actually have been more of a fan if they’d made it look like a regular Regal – with landau roof, natch.”

            You actually could get a T-Type with the Limited trim. It was quite uncommon though.

            newoldcars.com/1987-buick-regal-limited-turbo-t-2/

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            The Regal From Hell. Love it.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            A magazine tested the GN on a mountain road and on the downhill had to stop to cool the brakes. Just then one of the hubcaps melted off the rim into a puddle.

            Would it have killed GM to put that hot rod engine into something sporty? Screw GM. And it’s the GNX that fetches 100K plus.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Denvermike:

            “Would it have killed GM to put that hot rod engine into something sporty?”

            In fact, they did.
            https://www.thedrive.com/news/18687/heres-one-vintage-v-6-with-muscle

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Just then one of the hubcaps melted off the rim into a puddle.”

            A puddle? Yea, that certainly did not happen. The heat needed to turn a piece of open air plastic into a flowing liquid is much higher than “we pulled over to cool down the brakes”.

            “Would it have killed GM to put that hot rod engine into something sporty? ”

            They did. youtube.com/watch?v=4R7_gGfphWc

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Of course it didn’t exactly liquefy, and it held its shape for the most part, sitting on the gravel. But you give me far too much credit. Making up a storyline would take more energy than I have, if I had a worthy imagination.

            All GN articles caught my attention at the time, and getting rotors glowing red isn’t outside the realm. It was on a road I’m familiar with, SH74 between Palm Springs and Idyllwild.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “But you give me far too much credit.”

            Obviously.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Thanks. It was typical GM flexing, thinking it would bring them flocking to buy their dated meat/potatoes everyday junk. It was a day when great things were coming left/right from near all competitors. It was a make or break time and the Japanese car embargo was still going strong.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I like the Grand National and would be completely thrilled to own one today.
            If you don’t like them for whatever reason then that is fine, but many people apparently agree with me on their desirability considering how expensive they tend to be as a used car.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    I read the worshipful C/D cover story when this came out. It was a lengthy “inside story” sort of puff piece on the car’s development. Of course, the car’s development really consisted of tearing down a VW Golf and identifying all the ways they could eff it up. One of those in particular has always stuck in my head, mostly for the passive-voice denial of responsibility baked into its sentence structure:

    “The decision was made that the car would be three people wide.”

    Of course, that decision was a whole slew of decisions. In the end, GM’s conformist managers just couldn’t bring themselves to make the leap of faith that the American public would accept something THAT unlike an Impala. With that particular decision, “the decision was made” that the car would have larger frontal area, heavier weight, poorer fuel economy and acceleration. This story and the other comments do a nice job of detailing the same spirit of integrity-free half-assing that permeated the whole car across four different GM divisions. The smaller Cavalier, larger Celebrity, etc., followed soon after.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      As the story goes, GM supplied the automotive press with specially prepared ringers, so the glowing reviews make some sense.

      Then they began to test production vehicles, and the cars revealed themselves as four-wheeled excrement very quickly.

      Again, that’s the tale…wouldn’t surprise me if it was exaggerated somewhat to cover their embarrassment for drooling all over this rolling s**theap.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Freed, I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to hear GM did that. It wouldn’t be the first time they did so, including to C/D (their 1967 Six Muscle Cars Oldsmobile being a particularly egregious example).

        I think C/D boss David E. Davis Jr. was so jacked at the idea of Detroit embracing the Golf/Rabbit concept that he directed the worship session. Obviously, the rest is history. After GM’s previous f***up of the Beetle concept with the original Corvair, followed by its attempted Accord-knockoff ’97 Malibu, I guess Marx was right that history repeats itself first as tragedy and then as farce.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          The Citation wasn’t the first instance of Detroit doing a Golf-esque car – the Dodge Omni was a blatant Golf knockoff. I think autojournos desperately needed SOMETHING to be jazzed about in 1980, and the Citation was as good as anything.

          And you thought the late ’90s Malibu was a bad car? Wow, that’s harsh. I had some as rentals, and they were decent. I still see them crawling around town.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Agree with @Freedmike, the 5th generation Malibu has aged quite well. And I still see a lot of them around. Most with a rust spot just under the gas filler cap.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    In 1987 I rented a 1988 Chevrolet Beretta which was the all-new replacement for the X-body Citation based on the L-body platform, a
    derivative of the N-body.
    Even though it had the base 2.0 OHC it was head and shoulders above its predecessor.
    A couple of years later I rented a Corsica which also wasn’t bad. Definitely a bit better than a Tempo/Topaz but on par with the Spirit/Acclaim.
    Hmmm BDB late 80’s domestic compacts.
    There was a Pontiac version of the Corsica sold in Canada rebadged with the signature split grill as the Tempest, the same name of their value compact and mid-sized from the past. I’ve seen a couple here in the states. Now that would be a rare ride.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I came fairly close to pulling the trigger on a red Beretta in ’88 with the V-6 and a manual – it was a pretty slick-looking ride. Then I remembered I was driving over 60,000 miles a year on business, and figured that cheaper was better. Ended up with a Mercury Tracer instead.

      The Beretta/Corsica was definitely a step up for GM.

      • 0 avatar
        Zarba

        Agreed. Had a couple of Corsicas as company cars. a 3.1V-6 picked up from Enterprise, and a Black 4-cyl bought new.

        Nothing special about them, but they were pleasant enough to drive, got good fuel economy, and were very reliable highway cruisers. The Black car had metallic paint and had one of the best paint jobs I’ve ever had on a car. Damn near flawless, and I’m picky.

  • avatar

    I ordered an X-11 hatchback when they first came out. It was going to be my first new car purchase. I kept changing my mind about the color combo. It was either going to be silver with black striping (X-11’s had the big lower stripes on the sides), silver with red striping, or black with gold striping. I changed my mind so many times I forget what I finally decided on. But alas, there was a supplier issue with some of the X-11 components. The old clunker I was driving finally gave up the ghost and I foolishly purchased a Red Plymouth Turismo instead, since I needed wheels and couldn’t wait for the X-11 to come in. That car turned out to be a quality disaster and led me into the loving arms of a new Toyota Corolla which turned out to impressively well built and reliable.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Your story was repeated so many times back then. And it wasn’t just the cheaper stuff that had issues – EVERYTHING was garbage.

      One of my best buddies got an ’82 Camaro as his high school graduation gift. Unfortunately, it was powered by the ultimate gift: the Iron Duke. It wouldn’t go up hills with the A/C on.

      I dated a girl in college who told me her dad popped for ‘Vette for her high school graduation. She wasn’t driving a Corvette, and I asked her why. Well, apparently the ‘Vette’s passenger side door decided it’d had enough of being attached, and liberated itself. Yeet!

      I had another friend whose dad bought him a Trans Am Turbo for his high school graduation. Things were great until I drag raced him in my ’75 Olds wagon (which, unbeknownst to him, had a 455 and no emissions controls whatsoever). He got embarrassed. He did get laid a lot in the car, so I suppose that’s something.

      My dad had an ’80 Eldorado, black with no vinyl roof, over tan, aluminum wheels. Stunning looking car. He and I took it on a college-visit trip to Ball State, and man, did that car look great sitting dead in the breakdown lane of I-70 somewhere in Indiana.

      It was just an awful time for cars.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        You knew a lot of people with wealthy parents.

        Outside of Mercedes and Saab it does seem that everything was at its nadir in the early 80s. Things seem to have improved quickly though, I was driving late 80s and early 90s car until 2012.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Except for Honda. The 2nd generation Civic debuted as a 1980 model and the 2nd generation Accord as a 1981 model. Those generations particularly in comparison to what else was on the market helped to create a reputation which Honda is still dining out on.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @ajla:
            We had a ’75 450SE with jank A/C and a couple of electrical gremlins. And it was a small fortune to keep maintained. In fact, the dealer we went to had a service manager with a German accent who wore a white smock and listened to the engine with a stethoscope, and routinely announced, “Ze servize vill be $500”. And that’s $500 in Jimmy Carter era money.

            At the time I thought this was unspeakably cool, but came to realize it was a schtick meant to justify the inflated service costs.

            But, yeah, Benzes were no picnic to keep running. They were tanks, though – Dad had that car from 1976 to 1987, and traded it on an Acura Integra for my mom. The final straw was a $2,000 exhaust system repair.

      • 0 avatar

        I had a 67 Fury II with “Commando V8”. For a small aircraft carrier I laid waste all the turbo T/A, Z28, etc. etc. 383 4 barrel into factory duals.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Nice TTAC series, this Citation thing. Brings back happy memories of not owning one. Our family had left GM for Toyota, Subaru, and VW back then, which saved us thousands of dollars of grief (tens of thousands, in 2021 dollars). I rode in a new X-11 owned by a UAW worker, who bought the automatic over the stick to make doobie-smoking easier.

    GM’s mentality isn’t a whole lot different today. GM is still lost in it’s own smug little world. Its M.O.: Sucker the buyer in with gimmicks, and to heck with the post-warranty experience and reputation. One You Tuber recently said to keep the turbos for the GM 1.4L engines stocked on the shelf, like oil filters. I checked on the Consumer Reports ratings on the vehicles with this engine, and yep: they suck.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I had a mid 80’s VW. If that thing wass saving anyone grief than I cant begin to fathom how terrible that poor sucker’s ride was. It was just terrible. But at least it was complicated and hard to work on.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I had an ’81 Rabbit, and it was actually reliable. Of course, the exterior door handles would pull off the body, the interior window cranks broke routinely, and when the A/C drain plug got clogged, the passenger footwell would flood.

        But it always ran, never rusted, and never stranded me.

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          I too had an ’81 Rabbit. Its reliability wasn’t awful for the time, and it never stranded me that I can remember. And with swaybars and better tires, it really handled well.

          That said, its horn either went dead or spontaneously blasted by itself in traffic at least four times, and its valvetrain was saying sayonara by 60k despite faithful oil changes.

          I avoided the A/C problem by not having it. :.)

        • 0 avatar
          islander800

          My 1980 Rabbit Diesel (purchased new) was pretty reliable and got fantastic mileage – 55 mpg cruising at 70+. The body structure felt like it was built like a vault, rock solid. The only downside was the engine was downright agricultural, shaking so much that the dash was a blur at idle and acceleration was almost non-existent. But the worst was dealing with the German “service Nazi” service advisor. Seinfeld must have taken inspiration from him…

      • 0 avatar
        Mustangfast

        My family had almost nothing but VWs (uncle was a VW mechanic) and they mostly proved reliable except for anything accessory wise. Power windows wouldn’t work because of corroded switches, steel sunroofs would occasionally leak, odd spots would rust out but nothing catastrophic. Most of the family drove GM or other doméstics and I can remember thinking how much nicer our VWs felt, despite occasional flaws. My first car was an 88 VW and I finally had enough little things breaking to call it quits on them

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        @Art – there’s one writer and one frequent contributor on this site that can safely say that the grief continues 30 years later. How a dealer “fix” on a microphone can last under 10 minutes before failing again (today) has me at a total loss for words.

        Forget a mechanic. I need an exorcist. And for car prices to resemble something normal again.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Art V:

    VW reliability was spotty for sure.

    Pre-purchase, I did have major concerns about VW and reliability, but the ride and handling (and much more) was exactly what I wanted. (GM had severe structural shake, for example, and the company was too dumb to notice.) My VW-solution was to buy used, still in warranty, and use my B2B relationship with the VW dealer across the street. It worked. I was one of the lucky ones, reliability-wise.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    A compounding of arrogance:
    [a] “They’ll buy whatever we build”
    [b] “Shave every nickel. We’re barely making a profit on this crap anyhow, so why should we care?”

  • avatar
    el scotto

    A Navy buddy of mine was preening over getting a new Chevy Citation. It did have AC that usually worked. It didn’t run better than my Prelude, another friend’s 73 Lincoln, or another buddy’s VW bug. Citations easily have to be one of the top three GM products that drove hordes of buyers to the Japanese makes. I say someone should write a column asking which MOPAR, GM, or Ford caused you to switch to Japanese and never look back? To be fair, another column should ask which car from the Big Three did you keep buying and will keep buying until they take your keys away? Pick-ups don’t count for the buy until I die column; they’re like work boots or flip-flops they’re always around. Let the ephtets and praises start flowing.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Outside of the Grand Ams, which did have some unfortunate issues, all the GM vehicles I’ve owned during my life have largely been excellent and I’m fond of several of their older offerings.

      Never had a new GM vehicle though. I almost bought an Astra in 2009 but decided I didn’t have enough cash to do a new car and almost bought a turbo Regal in 2014 but it was too slow compared to the V8 competition for the same money. The only thing that GM makes today that I can both afford and would have interest is the CT5-V (the 3.0TT version) but it would be a big upset if I end up with one.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    The citation never died. It just mutated like a virus into all the fwd gm platforms that would compose the gm lineups for the next 20+ years. J a n l c w bodies all of them had x body dna and all of them suffered from lackluster build quality and driving dynamics. At worst badge engineereing. Its why gm almost went bankrupt in 1991 and finally did in 2009.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    And while the citation was sinking toyota (who was also moving to fwd from rwd) introduced the camry which was almost a clone of the citation body shell. The rest his history.

  • avatar
    BSttac

    If there ever was a brand that fit the phrase “getting away with murder” more perfectly than GM, I’d be shocked. Obviously your local hitman isn’t a brand so get serious.

  • avatar
    jrocco001

    My parents had an ’81. I was 8 years old when the transmission went out on it. The only reason I remember it is because I learned some choice curse words from Dad from this experience: I was riding with him as the spotter as he backed it very slowly (only reverse would engage) about three miles to a repair shop.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Corey–Enjoyed this series on the Citation I remember when the X cars were introduced and they were a big deal at the time. My brother’s 1982 Skylark Limited was an exception to the rule and was a good car with a 4 speed manual, fuel injection, and nice velour interior. Even with the 2.5 it was good but the manual made it much better. My brother got about 300k relatively trouble free miles mostly highway but he maintained his car well.

  • avatar
    Lefty54

    I had the corporate twin- a 1980 Pontiac Phoenix 5 door hatchback. It was a good car and I never had a bit of trouble with it.

  • avatar
    Tirpitz

    I still remember the Chevy Citation jingle where they drew out the Citation name. Must have run a lot of TV ads at the time for it to have remained in my head for 40 years.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      I’ll never understand for the life of me why they thought people would buy a car named after a traffic ticket.

      I read later that the GM braintrust actually thought the public would mentally associate the car with the 1948 racehorse. That’s just how far they had their heads up their hindquarters at GM.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        What about the car that previously used that name, the Edsel Citation. Interestingly that wasn’t the only Edsel name stolen by another car company. AMC did it first with the Pacer. The other two sedan model names also were resurected but by Ford themselves. Ranger, first as a trim level on the full size trucks and finally only recently Corsair.

        Of the wagon names only one has been resurrected Villager, again once as a trim level for Mercury Wagons and then as the minivan model.

  • avatar
    jhefner

    The Citation lives! On my model railroad layout that is. Life-Like sold an HO Scale auto transport train car that came with Citations. Due to that, I have about a dozen of them scattered on my layout and aboard an auto transport. That must have been an interesting and later embarrassing product placement ploy for Life-Like.

    http://www.ebay.com/p/1223913888?iid=183743691249

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I remember one of the disc jockey’s in Houston in 1979, Miles in the Morning, said if you get a speeding ticket while driving the new Citation that it would be the first citation of the 80s.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    My experience with the Citation was soon after they went on sale in the early 1980s. Next door neighbors got one. Quickly it developed running problems. I usually did not witness the morning, cold running problems as I was already gone to work. When I happened to be home I’d often hear it trying to run. It would make a bump-bump noise as only one cylinder was firing. After several minutes other pistons would join the act and whomever was driving would rev the motor and try to back out to the street. The Chevy would usually stall a few times before making a jerky exit down the block in a cloud of black smoke. Later I saw the scene from the outside. Mom or grandma would be smoking a cigarette with throttle WFO until it would get going on 3 or 4 cylinders.
    A few times the Citation baulked completely and was towed away. It was back after a few days, presumably at a repair shop, and ran okay for a month or so until the previous routine would come back.
    One day it came back on a tow truck, having driven away earlier.
    It sat in the driveway for some time and later was replaced by something else.
    The family knew me enough to know I was a mechanic, very glad they never asked me to work on it. IDK if the trouble they had was with that individual car or something in common to most of the Citations. From what I’ve read here it was probably a model wide problem.

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