By on September 28, 2021

While Mercedes-Benz has gradually been moving away from larger motors, it was still a shock to learn that the company would be removing the brunt of its V8-powered lineup in the United States for the 2022 model year. Higher-end vehicles typically come with broader profit margins and Americans tend to like V8s, so it was strange to see the brand tailoring its product at the last minute. Less surprising, however, was watching the entire automotive community speculate on the reasons why.

As your author is constantly suspect of regulations, it was my assumption that emissions compliance was the main culprit. But one would assume European rules would have put the kibosh on V8s in the home market long before cars were neutered in North America. Mercedes likewise suggested this was not the case, alluding to supply chain issues that have been hampering the industry since the start of 2020 while it promised to fix the problem as soon as possible. Then, Daimler executives started giving different answers and hit the reset button on the global supposition surrounding the discontinued engines. 

Speaking with Road & Track for the Munich Auto Show, Philipp Schiemer (head of Mercedes-Benz Top End Vehicle Group) stated that he couldn’t provide the outlet with any additional details pertaining to the absent V8s. But he then did the exact opposite, framing the overall situation quite a bit differently than what we were told in August.

“I cannot provide you with more details. It’s a quality issue. We are updating our vehicles every year, and we are not satisfied with the quality. And for us it’s quality first. So we have to do some retesting and this is the process we are in at the moment. So it depends from model to model,” Schiemer explained, adding that the S-Classes sold in the U.S. would still have V8s. “So it’s from vehicle to vehicle, from country to country a different kind of situation.”

When asked more about it, the executive refused to elaborate. But Car and Driver had badgered the manufacturer for information previously, receiving a statement that the V8 issue was predominantly about supply chain problems. While Mercedes suggested that other factors may be at play, quality control was not among them.

So which is it? Did quality concerns convince the manufacturer to change its North American lineup or is this a case of ongoing component shortages simply making it easier to keep building the smaller motors?

Perhaps neither. Car and Driver seems convinced that the quality assurance issues couldn’t possibly be the only culprit and noted that Aston Martin will continue using Daimler’s 4.0-liter V8 while Mercedes has it prepped for a few high-end models. It also doesn’t make sense that V8 powertrains have been deemed too crappy to sell in some markets but totally fine for others.

From Car and Driver:

Supply-chain constraints are similarly unable to explain the totality of the issue, especially given that this came largely without warning and the company is still supplying Aston Martin with V-8s. That leaves the compliance angle, alluded to in the official statement and Schiemer’s comments. Most engine changes require recertification by relevant authorities, meaning that it can be a lengthy process to get a vehicle back on sale when there’s an unexpected change. American authorities, in particular, have often been slow to certify vehicles in general and especially German ones in the wake of wide-ranging emissions scandals. That may be the most likely explanation.

While likely, it’s not particularly comforting to assume that Mercedes-Benz is keeping product out of our market because the regulatory pressures are getting too heavy. Tweaked for European compliance, Daimler may indeed have decided it might not be worth certifying the V8s in America. But the United States could end up being the tip of the spear as the company makes difficult business decisions and reinvents itself as an EV-focused entity.

The automaker has previously stated that the European Union’s strict emission rules would ultimately force it to streamline its powertrain offerings by 2025. “[Mercedes-Benz] will reduce the number of engine variants, going through Euro 7, by about 50 [percent],” COO Markus Schäfer said an August interview with Autocar.

Sadly, it seems like our market might just be getting an advanced taste of what that will look like as Mercedes focuses on China and Europe — both of which individually represent more than double the brand’s annual volume in North America. While I cannot say I like this scenario, it does appear to be a plausible explanation for why we’re not getting V8s anymore and leaves sufficient room for supply constraints to have played a role.

[Image: Mercedes-Benz]

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60 Comments on “Mercedes Confused Over Why It Ditched V8s for U.S. Market...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Shrinking overall USDM with less desirable choices, which came first the chicken or the egg?

    • 0 avatar

      Are the choices less desirable or is the V8 a less compelling product when people who want that thrust are looking at a different product? (Electric is what I’m getting at.)

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Good point. Mercedes has a ton of BEV options for buyers right now.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          “Good point. Mercedes has a ton of BEV options for buyers right now.”

          Speaking for myself, I definitely consider electric to be premium, and V8s to be old-school.

          I currently own a GMT900 2-mode hybrid which lets you sample both V8 and EV life in small measure. The vehicle feels premium when it’s running on recovered electric power, and it feels like a decade-old pickup truck when the V8 is running. Every time the V8 starts up, I wonder how many days it will be before I replace it with a Rivian R1T or a Tesla Cybertruck.

          I just don’t see a V8 as a premium option anymore. Charmingly anachronistic? Sure. But a V8 is no longer a premium engine. No explosion-engine can beat the smooth torque of an electric motor.

          BEVs will take over the premium segment, because they’re smooth, quiet, and powerful.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Between the spyware in all versions of Windows 10 and increased garbage on my corporate image my laptop is well on its way to being unusable. Just wait till your EV resembles a Windows XP instance full of rootkits and spyware, you’ll be lucky if it runs.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Speaking for myself, I definitely consider electric to be premium, and V8s to be old-school.”

            That’s perfectly fine, it’s your money. However, the joke is that Mercedes has no BEVs available right now. If Mercedes is dropping their V8 in preference for BEVs then they missed a big step.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        That’s sort of what I posit… curiously, is Mercedes offering both products simultaneously and allowing customers to choose both, may the better product win? I’m reading it as the EU dictatorship is putting a gun to our head and without the economies of scale we’re not building these motors for you so deal with it. Between cost and lack of desire, these type of moves will shrink the overall market so EV can increase market share without actually increasing any sales – all by design.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    It’s hard to remember that Mercedes Benz produced the 300 SL gullwing and roadster as well as the 300 SEL 6.3 and 450 SEL 6.9 sedans.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Ironically, of course, since we live in a golden age, my Volvo wagon is faster than all of those.

      Not as pretty (the W109s, especially, are very handsome cars; the Gullwing is too SportsCar for my taste), but close.

      (Hell, the 300SL’s 0-60 time is … slower than this year’s Corolla.

      Which only shows how impressive modern performance is, since the SL was blisteringly fast in its day.

      * Disclosure – I drove a W115 for a dozen years. Not a fast one.)

  • avatar
    twotone

    The last great MB V8s were the normally aspirated 550 and 6.3 (actually 6.2). My 2015 5.0 420 hp Genesis sedan keeps that dream alive. If Hyundai can do it, why can’t MB?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “If Hyundai can do it”

      The Genesis V8 isn’t long for this world either. The only place you can get it today is the top-trim G90 and it won’t be available at all after this product cycle.
      I expect the next gen Normal Mustang will be the last newly available naturally-aspirated V8 car ever.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        You think the base Corvette will go turbo/downsized/electric before the Mustang?

        I think Ford has laid the groundwork for ditching the V8 (2.3L Mustang, 3.5L trucks) faster than GM has. It’s also harder to hide a compliance fine in an $80K car than a $40K one.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @jack4x: There are already spy photos of the hybrid C8.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @mcs, I know the ZR1 and such will have a hybrid system. The base and Z06 are still NA V8, presumably for at least the life of the C8 generation.

            @ajla, Even if that’s true, I could see the C8 sticking around a long time. With the big investment in the platform and the rumored difficulties getting new Corvettes approved over the last couple decades I could see a C3/C4 like lifespan. Especially if they worry about the Corvette buyer not wanting to give up the V8.

            Also, I obviously flipped the statement in my first comment, it’s easier to hide the fine in a Corvette MSRP than a Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I don’t think the C9 will have a naturally-aspirated V8.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            @jack

            It is possible that the C8 will stay in production for a long time, but the C8 is already out so the Mustang will be the last *newly introduced* car with a naturally-aspirated V8.

            After that it will be truck and SUV only.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            Misread your initial statement as “available new”.

            I agree the Mustang will be the last one introduced, possibly barring some million dollar vanity project like the Gordon Murray car.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You assume there will be a C9.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Toyota may keep NA engines around. V8s included. Or at least bring them back intermittently. They’re less dependent on sales in markets where contrived fuel economy tests favor the more test-gaming friendly turbos. And they already have a sales mix which is very fuel efficient.

        I just don’t see Master Driver Morizo rolling over that easy wrt a great, time honored engine layuts.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The 6.2 was glorious. Peak MB for sure.

  • avatar

    “Sadly, it seems like our market..”

    I see nothing sad in their decision to get rid of V8. Personally I do not care since MB is not and never was in my shopping list. No V8 is good – one ICE less, less CO2, less pollution and screw snobs.

    • 0 avatar
      Victor

      Let’s all pretend the energy charging your precious little electric car is coming from unicorn-powered rainbow-plants that are oh-so-good for the environment.

      That’s a good illusion, I’ll give you that.

      • 0 avatar
        clockworkp

        Power plants are more efficient than IC engines. Add renewables to the mix and that becomes even greener. Coal as a power source drops every year.

        • 0 avatar
          kcflyer

          How do wind turbines and solar panelS being dumped into landfills every 20 years keep getting called renewables? Or did I just answer my own question? It’s a sick joke. Destroy the environment but call yourself green and somehow that makes it ok?

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “ow do wind turbines and solar panelS being dumped into landfills every 20 years ”

            Don’t know about solar panels, but wind turbines are predominantly made from steel and I’ve heard rumors that steel can actually be recycled. Like melted down and made into something new. Amazing.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Solar panels are recycled too. Recyclers get the glass, metal, and precious metals out of them. Also, they can last up to 50 years.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo2

            Do you think oil and gas rigs last forever? Seriously, is that what you think?

        • 0 avatar
          kcflyer

          “Do you think oil and gas rigs last forever? Seriously, is that what you think?”

          We have hydro, natural gas and coal plants that have been used continuously for decades, they need maintenance of course.

          “Don’t know about solar panels, but wind turbines are predominantly made from steel and I’ve heard rumors that steel can actually be recycled. Like melted down and made into something new. Amazing.”

          Nope, mostly composite materials, gets cut up and dumped in landfills.

          “Solar panels are recycled too. Recyclers get the glass, metal, and precious metals out of them. Also, they can last up to 50 years.”

          Nope again, they can be recycled but it’s cheaper to buy new so most get dumped. The fifty year thing might be possible in certain mild environments but most are being replaced in less than 20 as newer panels offer more efficiency and installers get to dip again into taxpayer subsidies.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Link with pictures of blades in landfills:

            https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2020-02-05/wind-turbine-blades-can-t-be-recycled-so-they-re-piling-up-in-landfills

            Link pointing out that:
            – The towers are steel
            – “About 85 percent of turbine component materials—such as steel, copper wire, electronics, and gearing—can be recycled or reused.”
            – Some companies are developing recycling options for the blades

            https://blog.ucsusa.org/james-gignac/wind-turbine-blades-recycling/

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Perhaps it is all of those things.

    Supply chain problems likely forced MB to look at alternate suppliers, and those suppliers couldn’t produce the quality they need (for a reasonable price, incidentally). It’s impossible to conjure new suppliers and new raw materials overnight, so MB may have just thrown up their hands.

    Regulations are affecting everybody, so I don’t shed any special tears for MB.

    Aston Martin’s volume of V8s is nothing compared to MB’s normal output, so it makes sense that they can still feed AM a few until the clock runs out.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Most European countries base emission compliance based on amount of CO2 released. Japan, China, the Middle East (among others) tax engine displacement so smaller turbo engines are the norm. The US has CAFE standards and guzzling V8s and V12s tend to drive the averages down.

    Welcome to the future boys, where shrunken engines with overboosted turbos have to be supplemented with 500 lbs of batteries and electronics to cover up the boost and smooth out the power delivery all to save a couple of MPG that will be lost by the extra weight of the batteries, and then the added environmental impact of scrapping a car earlier than usual because once it breaks, there’s no fixing it.

    I love the roar of a V8 as much as the next guy, and the V8 AMGs before turbocharging sounded stunning. But it’s a dying breed. Anyone who has driven a larger BMW or Audi with a 2L turbo-4 knows it just isn’t the same as the smooth, melodic 6-cylinder purring under the hood.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      Fan of flying
      is correct again. Top marks.

      It aint gonna work. Mark the tape. This BEV crap. Windmills that dont spin at night – thats when most beta male techies recharge f ing BEVs (less wind).
      Solar cells. Night happens 50% of the day. Add in snow cover.

      You ll need gas fired plants for back up. The same plant being closed now. Oh – by the way- those plants cost money.
      So, I hope you re happy with $0.45 /kWh electric you jagg offs.
      (while china and russia and india burn 1/2 price coal because stupid americans and europeans dont use it anymore).
      (and they gain further competitive advantage with super cheap energy and the same time our goes WAY UP)
      PS- China Russia India will burn it straight to the stack. 100% dirty. In usa, we burned it 95% clean.

      Michael Moore’s movie- “Planet of the Humans”
      Michael freaking Moore dude!

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @redapple:”Windmills that dont spin at night – thats when most beta male techies recharge f ing BEVs (less wind).
        Solar cells. Night happens 50% of the day. Add in snow cover.”

        That’s where grid storage comes into play. Michael Moore makes fiction. Always has. He’s not a journalist. Never was one.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Just wanted to add that I’m worried about the transition might be happening too fast. That’s why I’m not enthusiastic about the government pushing it so hard. Although, I’m starting to see signs the free market might end up pushing EVs harder than the government. I’m surprised to be honest. The market is growing way faster than I ever expected.

          • 0 avatar
            redapple

            mcs
            1 “The market is growing way faster than I ever expected.”

            Yes – because it is COMPULSORY. GOVT is forcing you to do it.
            Also, Basic game theory. Big car companies are ok with it. Push this new tech that you can pay for and your competitor cannot.

            2 High BEV sales? NO! Outside of CALIF. BEV are 1% of the market. Real big consumer demand here my man.

            3 Grid Storage? OK. But how much does it cost?

            Solar cells and windmills plus rube goldberg storage ~ $0.45/kWh. Total REAL COST. (Not the price after govt subsidies.) Basic math shows this is more than Natural Gas gen at $0.07 / kWh cost.

            Theoretically, tech greenies beta boys are ok with the added cost. Most average people – not so much.

            But it doesnt matter. The pervert demon cats have the conch. It s over. Submit. They WILL get your mind right.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo2

      “ then the added environmental impact of scrapping a car earlier than usual”

      That’s what you said about the Prius, which turned out to be among the most durable longest lasting cars ever built. You were wrong then and you’re wrong now.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        “Yes – because it is COMPULSORY. GOVT is forcing you to do it.”

        Uhh, no. You can buy an ICE car if you insist.

        Also, the oil industry is heavily subsidized (tax breaks, military protection, externalities), even more the EV industry.

        ICE cars will be more expensive, slower, and less reliable than EVs within my new-car-purchase planning horizon.

        By the time my oldest child can drive, owning an ICE vehicle will be considered a poor financial decision.

        But nobody is coming for your ICE vehicles. They’ll still be on sale, and nobody other than personal finance advice columnists will going to tell you can’t waste your money on obsolete cars, is that’s what you want to do.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “You were wrong then and you’re wrong now.”

        I’m sure a Maserati or Audi mild-hybrid will be as durable as a Prius. The same way the Cadillac 4.1L V8 and Lexus 4.0L V8 in the past were the same.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        The only concerns I’ve ever had about the Prius have been the degrading battery packs over time and the environmental costs and damage of mining the materials needed for the batteries and the large carbon footprint that a battery pack takes between mining and installation in the vehicle. I have friends with Priuses that are going strong over 100,000 miles.

        My comment is more directed towards pure electric vehicles being built by auto companies with less than stellar reputations for electronic components. When a VW id.4 craps out because yet another system fails out of warranty at 60,000 miles, is it going to get fixed or scrapped? How are Teslas going to hold up when the first generation starts wearing out soon? Are second owners going to shell out the big bucks to repair or are they going to be scrapped? Those are my concerns about these kinds of cars.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          We did too and in the 00s I believe battery replacement was 5 figures or more. However I’ve read since then its about $2K (not sure if that’s the pack or labor + pack) and they are supposedly good for ten years.

          I’m not up on the newer EV’s can their battery packs be replaced? Otherwise yes they will end up junked long before their time.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      …added environmental impact of scrapping a car earlier than usual because once it breaks, there’s no fixing it…

      Yeah, remember all the panic when carburetors were replaced by electronic fuel injection? Much too complex, can’t be fixed/diagnosed by independent shops…well, all that turned out to not be true. In fact, FI is directly responsible for improving reliability and long term durability. Same issues were brought up with hybrids, yet they are often tops in reliability. Electric cars should even be better still without an engine to maintain. The biggest threat to keeping high tech cars on the road once they are old is a robust supply of countless modules that are in every car – electric or ICE.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Not even the same thing, early TBI could be (and was) swapped for carburation when issues were encountered (Cadillac 368 comes to mind). Can the battery source be replaced when it wears out? The wheel motors? The equivalent of the ECU?

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          I can only go by the data from what models are out there now – pretty much hybrids – and most end up at the junkyard with original battery packs. Wheel motors same thing – and those that did require replacement were pretty rare. Not really any different than transmission work on an ICE car. The rare pack failure is not really any different than the rare engine failure.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This is no surprise with the increased mpg requirements there are only so many extra mpgs you can get out of an engine. Stelantis will eventually phase out the Hemi and most of its V8s as well. That is a major reason Stellantis does not push the Chrysler 300, Dodge Charger, and Dodge Challenger because the more they sell these cars especially the V8 versions the more penalties they pay. Stelantis could produce more rear wheel drive cars with V8s and make more money since the platform is old and already paid for but Ram trucks are not subject to the same mpg requirements and the profit margin is greater. Just not worth the extra penalties. Mercedes Benzes has the same issue and MB has to qualify their engines and drivetrains with the EPA. Much better to standardized the engines to comply with European and USA standards especially pertains to cost and the amount of penalties they will be assessed by not meeting the standards. MBs volume globally is much greater than Aston Martin. For car enthusiasts this is not good but most customers don’t know or care what type of engine is under their hood as long as it has the Mercedes star. Don’t believe this ask most people how many cylinders their car has. Many don’t know where the hood release is or where the oil dipstick is and that is one reason BMW has eliminated oil dipsticks which saves costs as well.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Don’t believe this ask most people how many cylinders their car has.”

      I expect people buying a new AMG-branded car know how many cylinders their car has, but I could be wrong. I think the V8s were rare enough in the current MB lineup that folks ending up with them would be actively looking for them.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    …As your author is constantly suspect of regulations…

    While regulations certainly created some teething pains, the reality is our cars are safer, cleaner, and more efficient because of those regulations. None of that would have happened otherwise. Even safety was a sales dud until airbags became common (Thank you Lee Iacocca)

    …It’s not particularly comforting to assume that Mercedes-Benz is keeping product out of our market because the regulatory pressures are getting too heavy…

    Considering all the emission cheating that was exposed, it’s pretty clear that heavy pressure to ensure compliance is necessary. And crippling fines.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “None of that would have happened otherwise.”

      I don’t believe that for a second. Unelected technocrats create even larger problems because they are *never* withdrawn.

      “Even safety was a sales dud until airbags became common”

      Did you somehow miss the many decades long existence of Volvo?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @ajla–Depends on where you live. In my neighborhood there are a number of MB crossovers driven by soccer moms and career women and if you asked them how many cylinders their MB had few would know the answer and fewer would care. Having the 3 pointed star as a hood ornament or on the grill is just as important as having the latest designer clothes. Most manufacturers are preparing for the transition to EVs which have no cylinders.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      A GLE350 buyer is different from an AMG-GT buyer though.
      My point is that to get a V8 in a Mercedes these days you generally have to seek it out.

      So most people don’t care, but the people that did care still care. If that makes sense.

  • avatar
    Greg Hamilton

    “The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it’s profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater.”

    Frank Zappa

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Mercedes and German car companies are all so confused.

    There was a time each played in its own sandbox.

    Mercedes was luxury.
    BMW was sporty.
    Audi was irrelevant.

    Now they all want to be the same. turbo this and turbo that. Make a hunched back sedan and call it a coupe. Make hunched back SUVs and call them something. They are all copy cats. compete with Honda civics and Accords.

    Mercedes soul was the SL. Remember the Bobby Ewing red SL? Remember the Bruco Sacco masterpiece. Then…Remember the abomination that was the last version.

    A neighbor of mine of Asian decent, bought a GLE for himself and a CLA for his wife. He always complained to me about cracking wheels and needing to replace tires. In his driveway, now quietly, rest two Lexus ES.

    So sad Mercedes.

  • avatar
    96redse5sp

    “… still a shock to learn that the company would be removing the brunt of its V8-powered lineup…”

    What? Mercedes removed the BRUNT of its V8 powered lineup”?!?

    Can you, or an editor, use the word “brunt” in a sentence – other than that one?

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Let’s see: “The fossil fuel Mercedes was brunt to a crisp.”

      https://thelemonfirm.com/2020/01/08/we-didnt-start-the-fire-but-mercedes-benz-might-have/

      How’d I do?

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Everybody seems to have missed the fact that the S Class still has the V8 available in the USA. It’s mentioned in the article here, as well as at C/D where I read the original article several days ago. I’d read that article instead of this mangled Posky version.

    All the more weird that Mercedes cannot explain why the V8 is available in the S Class, but not lesser models in the US. Supply chain issues, now quality problems? Mercedes simply aren’t giving anyone a straight answer. That’s their right. If they lose some sales, it’s on their own pointy Teutonic heads, and who gives a ratsass anyway?

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      @cunundrum Sir, supply chain and quality control issues often go hand-in-hand. A great many suppliers are backing their semis to the OEM’s factory every day. Vital parts like brake boosters and airbags and tiny parts like o-rings. There’s no way I’d want to be a manufacturing plant manager. I dabbled in setting up QC programs for a friend of mine. We have present and past plant employees on here who could tell some tales. Number one would be: but, but, but El Scotto Corp can’t make the same part for the vehicle I love and the vehicle I hate! They just can’t!

      • 0 avatar
        conundrum

        A trenchant comment. A read of these two stories might have you scratching your head, though:

        https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a37309201/mercedes-benz-v-8-engines-gone-2022/

        https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a37741072/mercedes-benz-v-8-engines-suspension-quality/

        I thought about the likely differences in spec between various versions of the same 4.0l twin turbo V8 that physically might prevent the unit fitting in different sized vehicles from S-Class to the E Class to Aston Martins. Then about differences that pertain to supply, and now reference quality, and yet vary from country to country. Could it be a lack of something, an intercooler hose difference, different component heights or widths, and discovering some part was made of cheesium, but only in US spec to exclude the S Class.

        Why Mercedes wish to keep the reason a secret is the point here. The people with enough money to order a V8 Mercedes instead of a Super deluxe RAM, F150 King Lassoo or Tahoe Mount Denali in the $100K price range are not a huge demographic. But when your order for an E63 gets turned down, you make a big stink, especially when you can just buy a new V8 S Class in the same showroom. It’s a rich person’s problem, and most people simply couldn’t care less about it. Except for the 50 commenters here, some of whom, of course, are already off on a tangent and flights of fancy about other things entirely.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @ajla–Makes perfect sense but most of the sales will be suvs and crossovers and a limited number of sedans and most of those customers will not care. Fewer and fewer vehicles are offered for the true enthusiasts and with those vehicles there will be limited production and higher prices. Mercedes is looking at the long term in which there will be more regulations, increased mpgs, and a future where ICE is regulated out of existence. This is not a very bright future for those who are enthusiasts especially those that there is no replacement for displacement. Makes for a more boring future where vehicles have as much personality as a toaster or refrigerator. Dodge has come up with specialty performance packages on the Charger and Challenger but those are limited and higher priced but even those offerings will eventually go away as the mighty Hemi will disappear. You will see more EVs which have plenty of performance and more than most ICE but they don’t have the sounds or the feel of the V8.

  • avatar
    MisterScott

    Well this is interesting. I had a 2022 AMG GLS on order that got “converted” to the V6. Cancelled it of course. I bought a AMG GT 63 S in June of last year and if there are quality issues on the V8 I’d like to know. The original excuse from the dealer on the GLS AMG cancellation was supply chain. I think quality control could mean anything. I rather suspect emissions. It seems like it is really impacting the dealers. My dealer is the #1 G-wagon dealer in the country. I’d be brushing up on my German and on next Luthansa flight to have a chat. The higher end models are the big money makers. It is weird to go in there and just see C and small ute’s on the showroom floor. Mercedes better this sorted fast.

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Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber