By on August 19, 2021

Despite being one of the only manufacturers not to incur heavy production losses over the global semiconductor shortage, Toyota has announced that its luck has finally run out. The automaker is estimating that it will need to cut assembly by 40 percent this September.

It’s not alone. Both Ford and General Motors have announced they’re also stifling production this week to account for a deficit of chips. Even Volkswagen Group has been cautioning that it might schedule more downtime going into the fall. But that’s basically been the story for all of 2021. Toyota just happens to be the newest inductee. 

According to Nikkei Asia, Big T had originally planned on moving 900,000 units in September but has scaled estimates back. Part of that is due to the high global demand for semiconductors, as we’ve somehow convinced ourselves that every consumer product needs to offer Bluetooth connectivity or some other digital goodie that adds nothing to its core function. Another issue is just how absolutely busted we’ve allowed supply chains to become after COVID lockdowns stalled facilities around the planet for months. But Toyota seems to be suggesting it’s the new Delta variant that’s mucking things up at present.

“The chip shortage is also a problem, but the big impact is from the coronavirus in Vietnam and Malaysia,” a spokesperson told the outlet.

From Nikkei:

At roughly 500,000 units, Toyota’s global production in September will be the lowest since May 2020, when the coronavirus was hitting U.S. and European factories.

Other automakers also feel the impact of the Southeast Asian lockdowns disrupting supplier production schedules.

Honda Motor cut vehicle output in the Chinese city of Guangzhou this month by 20,000 autos, or 20 [percent] of its production plan as of the end of July.

Nissan Motor has shut its plant in the U.S. state of Tennessee for two weeks owing to the impact on procurement of chips from Malaysia. Volkswagen, General Motors and other global automakers also have been forced to curtail production since late last year, mainly as a result of the semiconductor shortage.

Toyota from late July to early August halted assembly lines at some factories in Japan.

This is going to sound crass but the pandemic has been an extremely convenient excuse for bad decision-making for a while now. If something’s not going the way you want you can just attribute any mistakes made to COVID and absolve yourself of any responsibility. That’s not to suggest that the Delta variant isn’t on the march, just that it’s become the go-to excuse for any industry achieving less-than-desirable results.

Toyota even has a running tally of every single employee that’s tested positive that it shares with the media. These catalogs are just lists of locations, ages, and job descriptions followed by when they tested positive and last worked. The impact on production is always cited as “none” and begs the question as to the utility of keeping such close tabs in the first place.

However, the claim that parts of the Pacific are shutting down is true. Despite having fewer than 1,000 virus-related deaths overall, Australia has instituted extremely severe lockdown protocols many have argued border on human rights abuses. New Zealand shut down the entire country over a single COVID case. Thailand, South Korea, and Vietnam announced harsh new travel restrictions in July. China has also been introducing rolling lockdowns in any region authorities have cited an outbreak. This has hampered supply chains across Asia, encouraging global bottlenecks and production shutdowns extending well beyond the purview of semiconductor chips.

But it’s much easier to blame the high-profile absence of semiconductors than address the bigger issue that international supply chains are absolutely broken right now.

Based on how 2021 has progressed, it’s difficult to see a future where supply issues aren’t the norm. Automakers are still announcing profits (Toyota posted record quarterly earnings at the start of the month) while issuing warnings about parts shortages and downtime. Meanwhile, dealers are able to throw a meaty premium on vehicles due to leaner inventories, and governments the world over are enjoying more unchecked power than they’ve ever had before. It seems like the only person who isn’t getting a sweet deal out of this is you, and why would anyone care what you think?

[Image: Toyota Motor Corp.]

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57 Comments on “Chip Shortage Demolishes Toyota Vehicle Production, Pandemic Blamed...”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    Until consumers decide en masse to raise a middle finger to buying or leasing new cars, this will continue.

    The idea of simply keeping what you have and using it until it’s worn out or until your needs change is the opposite of our culture. It’s our collective stupidity, fiscal ignorance and shortsightedness rearing its ugly head over and over.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @jkross22 – “It’s our collective stupidity, fiscal ignorance and shortsightedness rearing its ugly head over and over.”

      That’s why my ex is my ex. The populace at large (and my ex) is of the mindset that as long as there is room on the visa, line of credit, etcetera, that the sky is the limit.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Ive paid outright for my last 2 vehicle purchases. One New, One Used. Was I just supposed to sit on that money and let inflation eat it while driving an older vehicle to somehow signal how virtuous and good with money I am?

        I wouldn’t buy a car now unless I had to, but this attitude of you are an idiot if you don’t drive a car for 15 years is stupid and frankly no less idiotic than pointing out that if you lack the means to pay for a car outright, you should have made better life choices.

        I do love lectures on finance from people with multiple car payments and 30 year mortgages though. I generally prefer them to stick to telling me I need to pay more taxes though.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Art Vandelay – there has to be a balance between unfettered excess consumerism and penny pinching with a 20 year old beater. There are those that buy just to keep up with the rest of the rat race.

          When I bought my truck 11 years ago the sales manager said that the average buyer keeps a vehicle 38 months. I laughed and said, “see you in 15 years”. He didn’t think that was funny.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @Lou…Don’t let this distract you from the fact that in 1972 a crack commando unit was sent to prison by a military court for a crime they didn’t commit. These men promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire the A-Team.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Art Vandelay – at first…WTF… then ROTFLMFAO. Awesome.

        • 0 avatar
          zerofoo

          “Was I just supposed to sit on that money and let inflation eat it while driving an older vehicle to somehow signal how virtuous and good with money I am?”

          You could also buy a S&P 500 index and beat inflation pretty consistently.

          Sitting on cash and buying cars aren’t the only two ways.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      jkross22-

      Can you afford a new vehicle?

    • 0 avatar
      teddyc73

      At least you’re not judgmental. Good grief. How about not lumping all car buyers under one umbrella. Everyone has their own reasons for purchasing a car and if that reason is a person simply wants a new car then so be it. Relax. Yes, I agree, the U.S. is a disposable society which frustrates me to no end. However it’s not my or your place to judge people for what they spend their money on. For our economy to function people need to spend and consume. Everyone benefits.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You do you, JK.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Bought my last “new” car in 2009. Pontiac G8. Sold it in 2018 with a TCO of about $1000 a year (not including gas).

      Won’t buy new again. There is no sense in it with a flood of off-lease vehicles.

      I can’t wrap my brain around 84-month loans with $700 a month payments for a vehicle that will be long past warranty.

      I am also very mindful of what may have been Jack’s best contribution to this site, that being able to own used vehicles out of warranty is a privilege and ironically requires a degree of wealth.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “Won’t buy new again.”

        You really can’t do the new-used thing anymore, wholesale has slowly been creeping up since 2014/15, never dropped in 17/18/19 as predicted and then add 2020 into the mix, fuggedaboutit. You can maintain what you have, you could do the buy and hold on older solid technology (Panther Love, Church of 3800, trucks etc) but what you will run into is age. Sure you can keep a a lot of stuff going but eventually you run into financial issues because of age related wear and economically it doesn’t make sense. The Obama EPA/CAFE regs prevented a new generation of solid (now used) cars from being designed when the old stalwarts like Panther, W-body, G-body were at end of life, that is why we saw such wacky turbo and tranny tech get added to the post 2010s. Do you trust this stuff at ten years old/100K+? I didn’t when it was new, and now they are shoving EV down our throat while simultaneously a “shortage” is occurring. This *is* socio-economic warfare, those with cash and/or credit are the only ones who can really afford to buy “new” everyone else is relegated to 96 month loans on new, new-used, or for the most part used up garbage.

        As you point out Jack’s thesis on “privilege” is accurate, as only the privileged will have automobiles in the not to distant future. Those who can still buy and those with the resources to keep old stuff going, the large middle ground (probably at least 50%) is going to be squeezed out (figure 10% with tech/mech resources to keep old stuff going, 20% new car every 3 years, 20% CPO buyers every 3 years). Klaus already told you the score.

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      The US is 5% of the world”s population – what you describe is mainly manifested here where the economy is some 70% consumer based. On the bright side: Global manufacturing and sourcing is producing much better engineered, manufactured, and durable products. Running a car for over 100,000 miles shouldn’t be chore (unless its German), etc. On yet another hand – if you live in a city and own a car – ask yourself if you really need to.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “Global manufacturing and sourcing is producing much better engineered, manufactured, and durable products.”

        Then why is the average life expectancy of a refrigerator 14 years and my 30yo US mfg one is still kicking fine?

        Much better engineered… to fail.

        “According to the 23rd annual portrait of the U.S. appliance industry, standard refrigerators usually last anywhere from 10 to 18 years, with an average life expectancy of 14 years. Compact refrigerator lifespan is even shorter, ranging from 4 to 12 years with an average life expectancy of 8 years.”

        https://www.mrappliance.com/blog/2016/july/what-is-the-lifespan-of-your-refrigerator-/

        “if you live in a city and own a car – ask yourself if you really need to.”

        Can I instead ask do we really need all of the people in my city or can we go on a diet?

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I’m in no mood at all to buy a car right now. I don’t like market premiums in “normal times” as I view it as a cash grab, and I’m not going to do it on an otherwise common and pedestrian ride. No car salesman should have as much power as they do right now. My three rides will keep going for quite awhile.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I’d like to buy a new truck as I approach retirement but not a full retail or full retail plus markup. I can comfortably live with my 11 year old truck.

      My son has an old Cherokee with a 3 inch lift on 33 inch Duratrac’s. He’s owned it for a year now. The guy that sold it to him wants to buy it back. He offered what my son paid for it. My son laughed at the offer.

      • 0 avatar
        MoDo

        I dicthed car payments and got an 06 4runner, small lift, TRD wheels, K02’s, performance brakes etc. One year of payments on a new grand cherokee are what it cost and it has gone up in value since I got it. Paid $9000 but I did the mods, I’d want around $15,000 for it now. But replace it with what? I’ll just keep it

    • 0 avatar
      Steve Biro

      Every year, a certain amount of us really do need new cars or trucks. Perhaps we’ve had an accident. Or perhaps our vehicle has truly reached the end of its service life. But, really, what percentage of total vehicle sales does that account for? 20 percent? 30 percent? I’m not sure it’s that high. But let’s be generous and say that’s it’s 30 percent.

      If the remaining 70 percent of us simply decided we’re going to hold off on buying another car or truck for a year or two – something that’s easily done – the resulting reduction in demand would see prices drop like a rock. And it would clear up lingering supply-chain backlogs as well. It would also give the industry a lesson it really needs to learn – that the customer is in charge.

      It might also give Washington a thing or two to think about. Heck, I’ve been a gearhead and driving enthusiast all of my life. But I would have no problem holding off on buying – because I don’t even like most new cars or trucks anymore. Even the nice cars for enthusiasts unveiled this week feature a full suite of electronic nannies guaranteed to sap the driving joy out of them.

      The vehicle market needs a major attitude adjustment.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I guess I’ll continue to watch the KBB values of my existing cars go up. Both my 2016 Highlander and my 2019 Bolt are up several thousand dollars from their values in early 2021.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    Wow, lotta judging going on here.

    As for the rationality of a new car purchase, who’s more rational than a Toyota customer?

  • avatar

    I will sell my car and ride bicycle. Solves all my problems

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      If you can sell a car and wait a while to replace it this is legitimately an excellent time to do that.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @Inside: Forget the bicycle. Find a way to import an Ola S1 Pro from India. 0-60 km in 5s and top speed 71 mph. It’s about $1,750 in USD and is capable of some nice burnouts.

      https://olaelectric.com/performance

      • 0 avatar
        Russycle

        @mcs: Nice scooter, but someone should tell those models to dress for the slide, not the ride.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          Have done the slide a couple of times myself. I agree. Also, My fear with one of these would be the brakes. It does seem to have a dual-piston brake up front, but I’d still worry a bit.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        A scooter…an electric scooter to boot…”Doesn’t sound manly to me, Bill.” George Carlin.

        Reminds me of the old “biker” joke, ” what does riding a scooter and having sex with an ugly chick have in common?” “They are both fun until your friends find out!”

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    I just took advantage of the wierd car market to get rid of my ’20 RAV4 hv. After 18 months and 23,500 miles, I sold it back to the dealer for just $500 less than I paid them for it. That dealer’s lot was already less than half full, and with this new announcement I’ll bet that lot just might be even emptier.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The Toyota dealer in my town has been sparsely stocked for the past year. The Ford and Stelantis dealer seem to have the best inventories. Honda appears to be ok. The local Chevy/ GM dealer seems to be cyclical. They’ll have an okay inventory then next to nothing for a month. Subaru is at least 1/2 their normal. VW seems okay but it appears their inventory turns over very slowly anyways. Nissan is down on stock but still have 2 year old Titan’s that no one wants.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I’m here in Hybrid Central on the West Coast. The local Toyota dealer here is forthrightly telling people that (1) they will have to wait several months and pay ADM if they want a Highlander Hybrid or RAV4 Hybrid and (2) they have no idea at all when they will be able to get a RAV4 Prime and it could be two years or more. So far people can get gas models or sedans quicker, but that may change now.

  • avatar

    Toyota will be fine. They are now double the size of GM and will survive based on economy of scale. In true Jack Welch fashion Mary Barra has cut GM to the bone in the pursuit of profits. I am still getting used to GM being in fifth place.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      You forgot:

      GM…WHAT A DISGRACE!

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      GM has set record profits with lowest sales recently. While GM forges ahead in leading ICE to EV revolution in North America, Toyota will be paying Pabasonic and Denso for their EV cars. GM has to basically cycle non-truck/large SUV production on and off while keeping truck production going and everyone laughed saying the Big 3 were silly to be still making trucks and parking them everywhere. Now it is Toyota’s turn to shut down everything except trucks for the foreseeable future.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Don’t let this distract you from the the fact that in 1966, Al Bundy scored four touchdowns in a single game while playing for the Polk High School Panthers in the 1966 city championship game versus Andrew Johnson High School, including the game-winning touchdown in the final seconds against his old nemesis, Bubba “Spare Tire” Dixon.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Lou is not saying you are an idiot if you don’t keep a vehicle for 15 years he is saying that many consumers have the attitude that the sky’s the limit when it comes to credit. If you don’t have a problem with your credit and you can afford to pay cash for something then this does not apply to you. I have a nephew that cannot resist buying big ticket items like campers, boats, new vehicles, and etc. even though he has declared bankruptcy in the past and lost about everything he owns. I ordered a new Maverick in July not so much because I needed it as I wanted it but I also plan on paying cash for it unless Ford offers me a no or low interest incentive financing. There is nothing wrong with the 2008 Ranger I have owned for over a year and I could easily drive it for years and if my Maverick was delayed for a year or the ordered was cancelled it would not be a big deal. My wife and I don’t go out that much because of the Covid and her health and we have managed to save a fair amount of money. I want a new truck that is more compact and that will be my retirement vehicle but I can honestly live without it. I do feel for those who actually need a vehicle now due to accidents or other reasons but many of us don’t really need a new vehicle as much as we want one.

    I do agree about inflation but another year or two is not going to make a significant difference. I kept my 99 S-10 for almost 21 years not just to be thrifty but because it was in excellent shape and I liked it. I doubt I will ever keep another vehicle that long but I do plan on keeping my vehicles 10 years especially if I buy them new.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Jeff S – statistically @jkross22 isn’t that far off the mark. I’ll keep a vehicle a long time as long as I like it and it meets my needs. If a vehicle fits those two points but starts to get expensive to repair or unreliable then I’ll replace. I like travelling into the backcountry and don’t want to worry about getting stranded. That also applies to winter time. Mind you with climate change we’ve had some wicked heat spells and fire smoke seasons so it’s becoming important to not get stranded even in the summer time.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    So many dealer lots look sparse, at least here in Indiana. I assume this is a big hit to those folks who are sales people…not much to sell.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Okay, for starters, has any auto manufacturer mentioned Australia or New Zealand lockdowns as the cause of any sort of supply-chain issue? I’m guessing the answer is “no”, and you were just looking for an excuse to go on a political aside that had nothing to do with cars.

    But since you brought it up… Perhaps neither Australia nor New Zealand want their countries to end up like the US, with countless thousands dead, packed ICU wards, etc. Short-term strict lockdowns in order to prevent month after month of an ongoing pandemic seem to be a pretty reasonable choice.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    “Shutting down the economy” certainly is a novel strategy for dealing with a pandemic, which never has been tried before. So far, its prophylactic effects on mortality are unproven; but its effects on economic well-being are definitely obvious.

    As for the “morality” of trading or keeping one’s existing vehicle, generalizations are foolish. I have an ’08 Pilot, which I bought new for cash. It now has 180,000 miles and is rust-free and in good condition. Last time I checked KBB gave it a $4100 trade in value. Despite having been serviced “by the book,” things are beginning to wear out. We just spent $2,000 replacing the ac compressor and a high pressure hose that had a leak. I replaced the rear shocks myself, but the front shocks also need replacing (which is beyond my capability). So, another $2000 to replace the front struts and probably other front suspension pieces that are worn. (It’s pretty noisy up there.). The tires, which were new in 2016, probably will need replacing in a year.

    So, if I do all that, I’ve essentially re-bought the car at its trade-in value and, having done all that, I have not increased the trade-in value.

    Now, I still have a 13-year old car with 180,000 miles that has expensive potential failure points, such as head gaskets or the transmission (the Honda automatic of that generation was not known for its reliability).

    So, the economically rational thing to do is trade the car while it’s still fully functional and replace it, assuming I have the money to do so.

    My other vehicle is a 6-year old Sierra 1500 that I bought almost new, which has 121,000 miles. I use that to pull our Airstream. I’m not considering trading it because the pickup truck market is even more insane. It also has been serviced “by the book” has had all 4 shocks replaced and seems to be working fine. That said, the GM 8-speed transmission in that truck has a bad reputation, so I’m keeping my fingers crossed. Even so, given the circumstances, it would be stupid to replace the truck and keep the Pilot.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @DC Bruce – my truck is 11 years old with 238,000 km. It spends maybe 10% of its time on gravel roads and then 4-5 months of winter. I’ve had the 4wd engagement module replaced under warranty and once coil pack out of my pocket. The rest fits into what I consider normal wear and tear for a truck. I’ve paid to have the front axle seals and pinion seal replaced, the rear shocks were replaced. I’m on my 4th set of brakes and tires. The rest has been “by the book” service intervals.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      DC Bruce-There are guys that like you meticulously maintain their vehicles-with all records that they take to the dealer at trade in time-and as you stated the Blue Book within a few hundred is what you are going to get in almost ALL cases. There are reports of the dealer just tossing the information in the trash can without a glance.

      Unfortunately-there is no category in the the “Blue Book” which has a column stating “well maintained w/records.

      Yes-you are at a cross roads and a replacement vehicle makes sense if you can afford it.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’m becoming more convinced to buy my lease when it’s due in November. It’s a problem-free car, and cheaper to buy than anything else its age.

    I was considering replacing it with one of the new EVs coming out, but actual availability of new product is questionable. Even newly ordered Teslas aren’t showing availability until January.

  • avatar
    gregtwelve

    A salesman at my local Chevy dealer who I do work for told me they cannot get the inventory they need. They normally sell 15 Traverses a month but only have one in stock. When they get a shipment of 5-10 pickups they are sold the same day. I checked their website and stated inventory and quantity of each model was:

    Blazer: 10
    Camaro: 1
    Colorado: 3
    Silverado: 20
    Trailblazer: 7
    Tahoe: 5
    Trax: 1
    Traverse: 2
    Suburban: 3

    Only 1 car available…the Camaro…and NO Malibus

    BUT: Equinox: 60

    Not sure if these are in stock, in transit or available from other dealers, but he told me his lot is relatively empty

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Lou_BC–I keep my vehicles a long time as well. My wife’s 2013 CRV only has 25k miles and that one I will keep at least another 10 years. My 2012 LaCrosse with 48k miles will be kept a long time as well. The 2008 Ranger I have only has 108k miles on it but I will either sell it or give it to a family member when the Maverick comes in which is looking like well into 2022 but I am in no hurry. Nothing wrong with the Ranger but I just wanted the Maverick and the dealer is only charging me $125 to process the title and I will pay the tax and licensing at the dealer. True it is MSRP but I get to take $500 off for being a Farm Bureau member. Will pay a total of less than 26k which includes tax, title, licensing which today is not that bad for a new truck even though it is FWD. I ordered the XLT to get the gray and navy interior with a spare tire, all weather floor trays front and back, spray in bed liner, cruise, intermittent wipers, and power adjustable mirrors. It will be Area 51 which is a light grayish blue. I don’t need AWD since the CRV has that along with heated leather seats, navigation and sun roof. The XL did not have cruise or intermittent wipers and only came with a black cloth interior. It was worth the little over 2k to get more features and an interior that was not all black.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Yesterday I had my 2008 Ranger serviced for an airbag recall at a major Ford dealer who had only 1 new Ford Edge on the lot. The rest of the vehicles on the lot (about 30) were pre owned Fords and Lincolns priced at new vehicle prices (most are returned leases). The sales people were sitting around without a single customer the 3 hours I was there. A younger salesman told me that he had no sales and that any new vehicles that they received sold quickly.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Why are people wasting time worrying about this. I’m sure Saigon Joe has a plan.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      You mean Kabul Kaboom Biden?

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      According to your party leadership, President Bonespurs will be reinstated in December. Then he can surrender to the Taliban again

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Ah the old Army trick…when you are on a run and sucking wind, call out others. Do show me where one meaningful Republican has said anything resembling that JD-$#!++y.

        And so long as we are discussing bone spurs, notice how Biden didn’t go to Vietnam either. Frankly I get why it is an issue with those on the right, but why does the left care that anyone didn’t go…are you upset you didn’t get to spit on him at the airport like the other folks coming home?

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          Biden was 27 years old in 1969, when the draft was put in place or enacted (choose your lingo) the age group was men 18-26.

          You don’t have to like the guy, but when it comes to the draft and ‘Nam 46 played by the rules that were set forth.

          FWIW 45’s administration negotiated the deal 2/29/2020 (leap day even) with the Taliban to withdraw by 5/1/2021. 46 followed through and I’m fairly certain everyone knew what was going to happen. 45 was quoted as saying he figured it would take 2 hours for the Taliban to take over..he wasn’t off by much.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If I were a dealer or a sales person I would definitely be worried. Chip shortages, Delta variant, fires in the West, appliance shortages, floods and hurricanes in the rest of the country, shortages in homes, Afghanistan, and etc. otherwise what other news does the media have to report?

  • avatar

    It’s not only Toyota Cars. Their Forklift division was hit hard this year. From the EPA restricting their combustion engine forklift sales, to this chip shortage.

    Toyota as a whole is hurting this year.

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    I’m still driving my S-10 with 535,000 miles on it. Costs me about a grand a year to keep on the road in repairs, I drive about 25,000 miles per year. Talk me down

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    Are you older than Biden, Art? It’s always the draft dodgers on the right starting the wars

  • avatar
    Polka King

    There might be other people like me who will not buy cars with psycho malevolent facial expressions like that. In fact, people who are turned on by that sort of thing ought to be monitored for psycho malevolent behavior.

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