By on June 22, 2021

Sensay/Shutterstock.com

Like most automotive journalists — and car enthusiasts in general — I have three ways of goofing off online that involve the cars. One is reading sites like this one. Two is building and pricing cars from mild to wild — from affordable to only if I win the lotto — on manufacturer’s consumer configurators. The third is browsing the auction site Bring a Trailer (BAT) to see what’s for sale that day. Someday, the just-right Fox-body Mustang will be available and within my budget. Someday.

As anyone who spends any time on BAT or competing sites like Cars and Bids can tell you, the mix of vehicles is incredible, and far more varied than what you might see at Mecum or Barrett Jackson. Those auctions tend to feature muscle cars and antiques, while BAT offers more opportunities to find a diamond in the rough. You might be able to find something special at a deal.

Of course, if you spend enough time on BAT you’ll notice that some, if not most, of the sale prices are a tad, how shall we say … fucking insane?

To wit: This auction closing today on this over $250K 1999 Nissan GT-R V-Spec. That price is higher than the average housing price in some parts of this country.

Yes, the car is rare. Yes, auctions tend to drive up prices because of a simple principle — buyers who really, really want something will pay whatever it takes to own it, even if that means overpaying. I get all that, which is why we don’t cover BAT often — this stuff is obvious and has been covered before.

But when you start seeing quarter-million-dollar prices for a GT-R or perhaps the first $250K Toyota Supra (so far, no Supra has cleared $150K on BAT, though the Fast and Furious Supra just fetched over half a million at a different auction), you start wondering when the price climbs will end. Especially during a pandemic that really hurt a lot of people financially. Yes, there are obviously buyers with means still out there. Yet, the craziness makes one’s eyes pop.

To be clear, this isn’t one of those rants against the rich. If people have the means to pay $250K+ for a 26-year-old car, especially one that has an unimpeachable reputation for performance, they can spend it however they want, as long as it’s legal. I also understand there’s not much BAT can do to stop certain bidders from raising the price of more affordable iron to the point that the average Joe/Jane is taken out of play.

Yes, it’s annoying when that latter scenario takes place in an auction involving a car that shouldn’t be too expensive. It’s one thing to see a super-high bid on a rare GT-R, but another to watch a run-of-the-mill Fox body or Camaro go from “hmmm I could swing that” to “never mind” in a short period of time.

That said, I know BAT isn’t going to change anytime soon. This means we really are likely to start seeing rare ’90s supercars going for a quarter-mil or more a lot more often.

The GT-R is just the tip of an iceberg of insanity, or just good old markets at work, depending on your point of view. Of course, those two viewpoints aren’t mutually exclusive — one can understand and appreciate the marketplace of an auction while also believing the market isn’t rational.

That is, if the market is irrational — some will say that given the rarity of some of these old cars, and their desirability, the price paid absolutely makes sense.

I think that’s why my brain is a bit broken here — the combination of seeing cars auction for prices 5X what they cost new (not adjusted for inflation) and the knowledge that this is how auction sites are going to run from now on. It makes logical sense that a rare and desirable collectible car would fetch a lot of money — arguably more than it’s worth — at an auction, especially understanding how auctions work and how they’re different from a dealer or private seller listing the car at a set price on a site like Autotrader.

Yet it also boggles my mind that anyone will pay that much for a 1999 GT-R, no matter how rare it is (especially in Midnight Purple paint), or well-maintained, or how much GT-Rs are beloved.

There’s a disconnect between the part of my brain that says “rarity+demand+auction=$$$$ and that makes obvious sense” and the other part that both can’t imagine parting with that much money for that car at this time and also is dismayed that other auctions for cars I might actually be able to afford could be so heavily influenced by a few well-heeled bidders that the cars become out of reach for most of the market.

Again, it’s one thing if a car is rare and desirable, and another if irrational bidding drives up prices on mundane metal.

It’s a hard truth, but unless something changes in the collectible/enthusiast used-car marketplace, the six-figure Supra is here to stay.

Correction: I initially identified the GT-R as a 1995. It’s a 1999. This post has been corrected and I regret the error.

[Image: Sensay/Shutterstock.com]

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72 Comments on “The Insanity of BAT Finally Broke Me...”


  • avatar
    jack4x

    Compared to the vast sums of money being speculated on stuff like crypto, GameStop, and NFTs, getting something tangible for your $250K seems almost quaint.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Cars built from ’75 to ’95 going up in value isn’t shocking as buyer demographics shift. What *is* disappointed (although not entirely unexpected) is that Boomer cars are still kind of expensive too, although they are down from their lofty peaks.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      grew up learning to drive on what was left of 2 colonnades- a 73 laguna (the awesome ugh)and a 75 malibu wagon (tantric the sex truck)

      nothing about either one was worth liking, much less wanting a well kept version.

      that said, id buy a jimny tomorrow if it was available. convertible of course!

  • avatar
    dal20402

    BAT has reduced the friction required to buy these sorts of cars. There is a large audience of people with more money than they know what to do with—the pandemic has only helped the 0.1%, who are 350,000 people in this country—and now they can impulse buy cars straight from the couch.

    We are also smack in the middle of the peak earnings years for people who grew up with early ’90s iron, so of course that stuff is going to appreciate. (Meanwhile, as the early boomers start to die off, we should see a correction in the muscle car market.)

    As an owner of an Acura Legend that is very nice but not in a configuration desirable to collectors, I’m in prime position to watch how BAT is disconnected from the world of the 99%. The manual and top-trim Legends that typically appear on BAT are mostly fetching $10-$15K, although one manual GS sedan (the rarest and most desirable configuration) recently sold for an outlier price of $32K. Meanwhile, nice Legends in the real world are $5K used cars. The disconnect in prices mirrors the disconnect in audience.

    • 0 avatar

      Not just the .1% in general the top 5% has done remarkably well over the last year. And many of them have enough income that 15-20k toys are perfectly within reach.

      • 0 avatar
        SoCalMikester

        far from the top 10% here, but i got a bunch of hazard pay, havent taken any of my 5 weeks of vacation with another 5 weeks coming around in october. havent wanted to go do anything in over a year.

        really havent bought much aside from a ton of F lately… and way earlier. not a big fan of their vehicles but theyre going to pay off my condo.

        after that done, its gonna be time to upgrade some rides :)

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          “really havent bought much aside from a ton of F lately… and way earlier. not a big fan of their vehicles but theyre going to pay off my condo.”

          You feel OK holding Ford right now? The news and rumors I have heard about their chip shortage and inventory crunch is not looking good. Meaning, I don’t think it will be over soon. So I am worried their revenues in the second half are going to be pretty bad.

          The recent crop of “puff” pieces about Jim Farley, EVs, and other vague, rosy topics also makes me think the stuff behind the scenes is not so rosy.

          If I had a lot of F stock, I think I would sell most or all of it at the current high price and look to buy back in sometime in mid-2022 or whenever things stabilize. (But I am no stock genius, just calling it as I see it now.)

    • 0 avatar
      eng_alvarado90

      Speaking about the Acura Legend… I just saw one of my favorite Youtubers last week going to a IAA yard in Portland (he lives in OKC). One of the first cars he featured was a 1987 Legend with the 5 spd. It was all beat up (needs front seats and paint) but it was a Run and Drive. I bet it went for cheap through the auction.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_XQQqTKLYo

      This is one of the reasons I follow this guy, I like YT channels featuring cheap cars. There are thousands of car channels for all those six figure cars and certainly we don’t need any more of those.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Will the nuttiness over cars like this one drive up prices on mundane cars? I don’t think so. The market for a totally cherry collector’s car and an ex-rental Camry are two very different things.

    Though Tim didn’t mention it, I suspect the availability of low-interest loans these days might have something to do with it.

    (Aside: I think I may have actually seen this particular GT-R here in Denver at a cars and coffee, and if this is the same one, it’s in spectacular condition.)

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Will the nuttiness over cars like this one drive up prices on mundane cars? I don’t think so.”

      Depends what you consider “mundane”. When the Boomer cars exploded so that a Chevelle 454 was worth $350K that made stuff like a 396 Caprice or 390 Galaxie XL worth $60K.

      So I can definitely see Supra prices positively impacting things like Celicas, or manual-transmission Accord Coupes. However, it probably won’t make a Corolla CE into an investment car.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I go to lots of car shows in Denver, and the well-maintained “survivor” examples of everyday cars tend to get lots of attention. Using the Celica/Supra example, you expect to see cherry Supras because it was a cool, desirable car from day one, but Celicas were a lot more mundane. People babied those Supras; the Celicas, less so. As a result, I would suspect that well maintained Celicas might even be rarer than Supras.

        I think it’s novelty, not the “Supra effect.” Ditto for something like a super-clean ’71 Chevelle four-door with a six.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Supra/Celica is just an example I used and attention at a car show doesn’t necessarily correlate to auction pricing.

          I think there is a lot of evidence showing secondary price increases in cars of the 50s and 60s as the most sought after examples started going for unobtainable prices. I don’t expect cars of the 70s – 90s to be any different.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          I’ve been to a few local car shows where genuine survivor examples of workaday vehicles grab as much attention as a Tri-5 Chevy or 1st-generation Mustang.

          If I recall correctly, one example was a 1980 Citation five-door hatch that had a couple less-obvious flaws on a couple pieces of trim, but otherwise looked like it had just been driven off the showroom floor, replete in the beige-over-dark-red two-tone paint, the same as so many others. That drew more attention than a survivor-condition ‘55 Buick a few spots down from it.

          I’ve also seen a 1978 AMC Concord coupe, in the beige which was so common in those, again nearly minty-fresh, including the Monroney taped to the window! My guess is that at some point, someone will grab an Olds Ciera of early vintage, polish it up, and bring it to a show. As many of those as GM cranked out, there’s got to be a trove of NOS parts that people will use to bring decent examples of one of those back to life.

      • 0 avatar

        Yep I have watched it have an effect in the local market on OBS Ford trucks and GMT 400’s. Every time a high price rolls thru on BAT the local markets seem to go up. Junk i still junk but say that old man 96 2wd silverado with 40k miles you could have bought for 3k a few years ago is now 7-10k truck.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @mopar:

          I think that fits what I was talking about – most folks who bought plain ’96 trucks used them for work, and those got used up, so the cherry ones are worth something now.

          Plus, with most modern trucks being so incredibly oversized, with all the bully-boy styling nonsense, a basic two door truck that’s well kept is a novelty these days.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            They were the last good trucks GM made. But as with the OBS Fords and 12 valve Cummins, you can do a full resto/mod and still come in under its (improved) value, especially with your skills/labor, and for a tiny fraction of new.

            It’s sparked a cottage industry of building turnkey resto pickups and Excursions selling easily for 3X “book” or more and better than new, pre emissions diesels bulletproofed, etc, etc, with a long waiting list including commercial users.’

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I’m not so sure that low interest loans are a driver in the $250k old car market. I seriously doubt you’ll find many companies willing to write that note and if they are it won’t be at a low interest rate. Of course there is the house as a cash machine thing with some people using HELOCs and cash out refi to buy toys, though I just imagine that being commonly used for $250k collector cars.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        That’d be the day I use a HELOC to buy a toy, but as you say, I guess people do it.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          I remember coming across 1 particular foreclosure several years as they were filtering across the block. It was near me and seemed interesting so I dug into it a bit. For whatever reason the google street view car had been by a number of times.

          These were not people that should have lost their house in the crisis. They purchased it with 10% down several years prior to the run up in prices and then crash. After 2-3 years a second mortgage showed, then a refi that wrapped them up and took out some cash. Then someone introduced them to 80/20 and there were like 3 of those taking 30-50k at a time. Between street view and attempts to sell when they were upside down the picture became very clear.

          Some of the money was spent on the house as as they did add a 3 lane to the driveway that ran along side the house and into the back yard. That at one point was filled with a large motorhome, a good sized boat, a lifted 4×4 truck to pull said boat.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @scoutdude: sounds like one of those untermenschen who did a “strategic foreclosure” – they just walked away from the house and mailed the lender the keys.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @FreedMike, in that case it was in and out of foreclosure several times over a period of ~2 years or something like that and did go across the courthouse steps.

      • 0 avatar

        If you have enough capital (as in you don’t really need a loan) some bank somewhere will give you a low interest rate to buy just about anything. Back when I dealt with truly wealthy people they often had huge credit lines they could use on almost anything.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        If your brokerage account balance is high enough you can borrow against that at very low interest rates. If you’re a 45 year old Amazon executive that’s going to make a lot more sense than selling 70 shares of AMZN to buy a $250k 1994 Supra Turbo.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        All lending is based on risk and profit, and low rates definitely make lending more attractive. Classic car loans are definitely out there, and they don’t carry a much higher rate than regular used car loans. That tells me that lenders a) can borrow cheaply, and b) aren’t scared of the risk because they’re securing the loan with an asset that they feel is appreciating.

        Keep in mind cheap money also brings buyers into the market that might not have been there before, which drives up demand.

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          I would also imagine that it’s like insuring a Corvette or Ferrari. People think they must be expensive to insure. But in fact they are very cheap to insure. Why? Because the 50s empty nesters who buy them take them to cars and coffee and then go home and wash them and rub them with a diaper. I assume the same is true with loans – the type of person buying a $50k or $150k collector car is super responsible.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        My point was that the buyer of a $250k collector car isn’t a payment buyer asking how much can I get for $xxxx per month? They pay what is needed to get what they want.

    • 0 avatar
      Tirpitz

      “Though Tim didn’t mention it, I suspect the availability of low-interest loans these days might have something to do with it.”

      This is absolutely a factor.

      What do you think happens to someone like Hoovie of Hoovie’s Garage if we return to the high interest rates featured at the end of the 1970s?

      • 0 avatar
        SoCalMikester

        each of his videos basically pays for the car and all work needed. and his family owns a bunch of fast food joints.

        like demuro, he came up with money and did something with it.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yep, Hoovie’s life doesn’t sound all that bad.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            That entire “Wichita car mafia” brings home a ton, especially John Ross of “WatchJRGo”—I doubt the guy gets more than a couple hours of sleep a night!

            More power to them, as long as they can play the YouTube system to their advantage, I say! I don’t think I could put in twenty-hour days to do what is needed to sustain a channel, so good on the people who do!

  • avatar
    FerrariLaFerrariFace

    What cracks me up is how it’s ruined buying/selling everywhere else. Typical comments on Facebook Marketplace on a 79 Spitfire:
    “Your price is too high”
    “But I saw one sell for $20k on BaT.”
    “Then go sell it on BaT”

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Whether you assume the buyers are rational or not the fact is to get to whatever the hammer price is requires two bidders. So yeah you might say that someone over-payed, but it would only be by the $500 or whatever the minimum bid increment is vs what the other guy was willing to pay.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Over $10K with real bids.
    hemmings.com/auction/1990-cadillac-coupe-deville

  • avatar
    lastgeneration

    Let’s be honest… this post is an elaborate, indirect way of saying “I can’t believe an import is selling for 250k”. Domestic muscle car guys are still salty in 2021, sheesh

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      Nothing to do with imports. I’m not tribal like that, and I’d have written this post based on certain domestic cars, too.

      The GT-R was just a jumping-off point to explore the overheated auction market. I could’ve picked many cars on BAT, including domestic, but that one jumped out.

  • avatar
    jmo

    What you seeing with the Supra is that guys who were 16 in 1993 and lusted after a Supra are now in their mid 40s and the surgeons, entrepreneurs, law firm partners, executives, etc. among them now have the money to buy their dream car. The same holds for 1990s Land Rover Defenders among other vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Exactly, just as it was with the boomers who lusted after Mustang Mach 1s and such when they were kids.

      I just hope that today’s kids don’t get nostalgic for CR-Vs.

      • 0 avatar

        I think they are nostalgic for CRV’s. I’m starting to see lot’s of first Gen CRV’s restored and some lifted and some lowered. It’s a thing already. Also see Honda Element.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I can see the Element and the first CR-V being kind of desirable. The new ones? God help us all if those get collectible.

          Another one I can see as collectible, assuming no one’s modded it into oblivion: the original Subaru Forester XT, with the WRX engine.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        I bet you’ll see a ton of demand in 2050 for 2021 Ford Raptors and other high spec full size pickups along with high spec SUVs – Cherokee Trackhawks, X5Ms, GLE 63 AMGs, Cayenne Turbos, along with maybe a few Tesla Plaids, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        Tirpitz

        I had a 2001 CR-V for over 10 years, sold it and then missed it so bought another one. Under 100K miles with a box of parts needed to redo the brakes and time belt all for $3K. That was four years ago and people are asking between $5K and $6K today for a CRV in good condition. $3K will only get you a worn out example with over 200,000 miles.

        Elements command 50% more than CR-Vs. All of this in Southern California which I know can be a strange market for cars.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Raise interest rates!

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I got sick of BAT when I saw Volvo 240s in worse shape than some of mine (which I sold for $2500), go for silly prices.

    BAT does a number of shady things, like delete comments that point of faults with cars being auctioned.

    Btw, doesn’t the title “Bring a Trailer” imply that you’re bidding on a cheap project car? Why is it suddenly a Gran Turismo auction house now?

    • 0 avatar
      FerrariLaFerrariFace

      BaT started out as merely a clearing house for links to ebay and craigslist ads and other assorted interesting cars for sale. Mostly junkers and barn finds, but with strange or interesting pedigree. Hence the name “Bring a Trailer”. As it grew in popularity, the site owner(s) sought to better monetize the website and started running auctions themselves. This was only a few years ago. Since it was already known as the place to go to find rare and interesting cars for sale, it was a natural place to attract the kinds of buyers with money to burn. People were already sending them their car ads and begging them to feature them, since the site had so much traffic, so it was a natural evolution to simply become the listing site rather than just a link to the listing site. It’s only gotten bigger and flashier since then.
      If you want to have a look at what BaT used to be back when they started, check out barnfinds.com

  • avatar
    Snooder

    The thing about the pandemic, and the broader recession recovery is that while some people got hosed, lots of people made bank.

    Basically, the poor got poorer and the rich got stinking richer. It’s not surprising that they subsequently have money to blow. It’s the same reason the CEO of LVMH briefly became the richest man in the world.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Only 2 things are guaranteed. Death and Inflation. It’s just a sketch time for normal investments. Might as well have some fun before you die, hand it all over to your ungrateful kids.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’d argue that insane auction prices are a good indicator of a healthy market. It’ll be sadness when formerly desirable cars no longer command a premium, and all those owners wonder why they paid so much.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      As long as it’s still desirable to you, who cares? If it’s purely an investment, no love, you get what you damn deserve and thanks for driving up the cost for true fans.

      Ideally you’re keeping it ’til the end. But with little value, you won’t regret driving it often, daily, in weather and or like it’s stolen.

      • 0 avatar
        Astigmatism

        I agree with this 100%. If I had a third space in my garage, I would significantly overpay for a Grand Wagoneer restomod or a cosmetically perfect E34 5-series, because they’re cars I grew up with in my family, fell in love with, and never fell out of love with – and now I’ve got money. It’s worth it because it’s worth it to me.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Tim, it’s worth pointing out that the Skyline you reference is a 1999, not 1995 as you point out. And it’s worth it since the car has not yet achieved the required 25 year age requirement in the US for that car to be driven on US roads. It was imported under the show and display rules which severely limits how the owner can use it. And, while I am not only basing this on hear-say, my understanding is that the new owner must re-apply for that same status. I’m unsure of what happens if they get denied. That fact may have kept bidding DOWN on this car.

    I looked at a 1996 Nissan Skyline GT-R V-Spec at a small dealership while visiting a friend outside Tokyo back in 2014. The car had about 68k miles on it and the dealer was asking the equivalent of $13,000. I was beside myself at the time wishing I had some way to buy it and hold it in Japan until I could ship it here legally. That same car today would cost $50k at an import dealer. This has had a drastic impact on the prices of cars in Japan as well. That same car would probably be selling for $35-40k there. The Japanese also resent US buyers taking all the Skylines out of Japan.

    Finally, I have a 1967 Impala which I restored with the help of my family back in 1993. I’ve had it insured by Hagerty for the last 10 years. It was not road worthy at first and once I got it back up to snuff I requested a modest 10% increase in the agreed value. They had me take photos and write an explanation as to why I thought it was worth so much more. They agreed and that’s where it’s been valued since. My policy is up for renewal and I realized I needed to increase the value again due to the current market. I requested a 33% increase and they accepted it automatically with no human intervention. Obviously I am still valuing it too low for their algorithm.

    Things are nuts. And while everyone says the bubble will burst, I am not so sure. Yes collector car values dropped during the recession, but were they ever affordable after the affects of Barrett-Jackson took hold? I don’t think so.

  • avatar
    aja8888

    Let’s see….$250 K disposable:

    $100 K – New 2021 Corvette

    $100 K – nice size sailboat

    $50 K – Pickup truck to pull sailboat. Or if I have a slip, use the $50 K for a few weekends of hookers and blow!

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    aside from all those deaths, the pandemic has probably helped more than it hurt as far as forcing people that have crappy jobs to look for slightly less crappy ones.

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    2.0 and I were considering a number of interesting smaller cars to enjoy taking to a Cars and Coffee-esque event or three and we narrowed it down to the best model for the best year. Though we paid well for it, the car was as good as described and the bar has since been raised.

    For all the nega comms about BaT, they really pulled it together for us esp on the delivery, where the independent driver they were using turned out to be a real douche. They found a great car museum near us to accept delivery after our holiday window was closed, and taking full responsibility for the delays, covered the cost of the transport.

    I would GLADLY use them again but this was a one-and-done for us. THANK YOU, BaT!!

  • avatar
    John R

    “Yet it also boggles my mind that anyone will pay that much for a 1995 GT-R, no matter how rare it is (especially in Midnight Purple paint), or well-maintained, or how much GT-Rs are beloved.”

    Well, a few things:

    First, the link provided goes to a Midnight Purple II 1999 Nissan Skyline GT-R V-Spec; READ: 1999, not 1995. This is INCREDIBLY crucial as one (1995) means R33 GT-R (the least sought after of the R32, R33, R34 trio) and the other means R34 GT-R (the one almost every enthusiast thinks of first when acronym “GT-R” is said)

    Second, yes, there are 282 of the Midnight Purple R34’s, which isn’t vanishing, however, there aren’t a whole lot of R34 GT-R’s period. There are only roughly 11,600 of them (https://gtr-registry.com/en-bnr34-vin-table.php).

    So, essentially, there is an entire planet competing for the one of the rarest (282) of the already rare (12k). And the world isn’t just North America and Europe. It’s Asia (India included), Australia, and Latin America also. Places that may care more for this than something you personally like and think $250k is justified.

    In terms of pure speculation it’ll only get better (or worse depending on perspective) once the 25 year rule barring R34 GT-Rs for general use expires and then you see examples of the Z-Tune show up in BAT.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I’m glad for sites like BAT and the new copy cats that bring attention to the experience and enjoyment of something that’s not brand new.

    If it raises the value of older cars, even better. It might convince those with a passing interest that it’s an enjoyable hobby while teaching them about the nature of depreciation/appreciation.

    As the owner of a car 6 years away from classic car plates, it’s kinda fun to see what’s happening. Even more fun to see my youngest say to me, “I want to learn how to drive your car. It looks a lot more fun than mom’s car.” My car’s the manual. We’ll see how she feels when she’s 16. I’ll remind her she’s outright said she wants to drive a car older than she is.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “If it raises the value of older cars, even better. It might convince those with a passing interest that it’s an enjoyable hobby”

      I only see the rising values raising the barrier to entry for those who don’t own classics.

  • avatar

    My dream car in 1990s was Houndai Elantra. I would pay any money to buy one but all of them rusted away in 1990s. Salt on roads 8 month a year did not help. Even German tanks could not survive Russian winter. Elantra would cost 1 million rubles if you find one.

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    There’s too much visibility to find many (any?) deals on BAT. Years ago, sure, but not now.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Recently Bring a trailer auctioned the transaxle from James Deans Porsche Spyder. Bidding went up to $382,000. The winner was a Las Vegas museum proprietor. I’m still waiting for someone to sell the drivetrain from Jayne Mansfield’s 65 Buick Electra.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The four-eyed Fox Mustangs have the most to gain. They were really cast aside, forgotten and junked a lot once the aero Foxes hit and I’ve seen too many converted to ’87+ noses. They still need to be minty and extremely rare, like Saleens, Mclarens, maybe Cobras and Pace cars.

  • avatar
    JimC31

    I’ve never bid on anything that expensive, but it seems like people treat auctions like gambling. It’s entertainment, they’re not doing research and looking for a good deal, it’s just about the fun of winning, and if they actually profit, well that’s cool. So the prices of ANYTHING at auction tend to quickly become absurd.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Well you made me look. Now I want the ‘69 white Alpha Spider with the long boat tail – beautiful car. I replaced a head gasket on that engine years ago on a friends car. That thing if pure fun to drive, it’s the reason i bought a Miata. You had to torque the head bolts twice, a second time after 1000 miles, they were long studs that went all the way through the cylinders into the bottom end. Ran like a top when I was done with it, a pleasure to work on. If I hadn’t just bought myself a mini-ranch I might just have to over-bid.

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