By on April 13, 2021

 

2020 Subaru Outback

2020 Subaru Outback Onyx Edition XT Fast Facts

2.4-liter turbocharged horizontally-opposed four-cylinder (260 horsepower @ 5,600 rpm; 277 lb-ft @ 2,000-4,800 rpm)

Continuously-variable automatic transmission with eight-speed manual mode, all-wheel drive

23 city / 30 highway / 26 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

10.1 city, 7.9 highway, 9.1 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $34,895 (U.S) / $39,295 (Canada)

As Tested: $37,995 (U.S.) / $41,549 (Canada)

Prices include $1,010 destination charge in the United States and $1,975 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

Subaru’s Outback has long been a standard-bearer for wagons. The addition of the Onyx Edition XT trim level for 2020 won’t change that.

Really, that’s the big news, and I don’t mean that sarcastically. While minor trim-level additions and changes sometimes seem so minor as to not be worth a review, this one is.

Mostly because any trim with “XT” in the name gets a turbocharged 2.4-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that makes 260 horsepower and 277 lb-ft of torque. It’s the first turbo in an Outback since early in Obama’s presidency – when your author was still (just barely) in his 20s. And yes, it’s a boxer. Naturally.

Other new for 2020 goodies include the tablet-style, 11.6-inch infotainment screen that has been popping up across the Subaru lineup, a hands-free power liftgate, a driver-distraction mitigation system, and the addition of advanced adaptive cruise control with lane-centering to Subaru’s already existing EyeSight safety suite.

2020 Subaru Outback

Let’s start with the turbo. While it adds 111 lb-ft of torque and 78 ponies over the base 2.5-liter naturally aspirated boxer four it doesn’t exactly make the Outback swift. You won’t struggle in most situations, including merging, but you won’t blow anyone’s hair back, either. The words “fine” and “adequate” come to mind.

That applies to the ride and handling aspects, as well. The car is perfectly pleasant to drive, but not terribly dynamically engaging. It’s just, well, fine.

This isn’t really a problem, since the Outback is designed with safety and utility in mind. And it does what it’s supposed to well enough, or at least as well as I can tell – I didn’t actually take the Outback camping or load it down with kayaking gear. I suspect, however, if I needed to use it those ways, it would do quite well.

2020 Subaru Outback

Yes, Subaru saddles this car with a CVT, and that may be part of why the Outback doesn’t necessarily feel quite punchy unless you use the paddles to replicate an eight-speed automatic. At least this CVT doesn’t drone or whine like some do. As you no doubt know, the Outback, like most Subies, is AWD.

As far as the other features go, the large tablet-like infotainment screen is an improvement over what Subie offered before, though the screen can still look a bit outdated in terms of fonts/graphics. One nice touch is how you can set it up to be a split-screen between Apple CarPlay and the Subaru system.

2020 Subaru Outback

Part of the Onyx treatment is more-aggressive styling and blacked-out wheels. The overall Outback shape is retained, so the car still looks familiar, but there’s an aggro theme to it that will be off-putting to some. I am not sure that legions of families who buy Outbacks for safety and family trips to the trailhead were clamoring for a roided-up look, but then, I don’t have access to Subie’s internal customer survey data.

The specific exterior styling changes that Onyx brings include 18-inch wheels (blacked-out, as previously noted), a black finish to other elements such as the lower front bumper, and specific badging. The interior gets a gray two-tone treatment.

2020 Subaru Outback

Interior controls are mostly what Subaru calls direct-touch, though buttons and knobs remain for certain functions, thankfully. Most notably that means there are knobs for the audio and buttons for the basic HVAC controls – temperature and defroster.

As for the updated EyeSight system, the lane-centering system does what so many others do these days – guide the driver back should he or she stray. Meanwhile, the driver-distraction mitigation system uses an infrared camera and facial-recognition technology to scan for signs of fatigue and/or distraction before alerting the driver. I found it to be a bit inconsistent – occasionally it would alert if you took your eyes off the road to say, change the radio station, but trying to trigger it by intentionally looking away from the road (when it was safe, of course) didn’t always work.

Other standard or available features include automatic emergency braking, lane-departure and sway warning, front-view monitor, rear-view camera, a traction-management system, LED headlights and fog lamps, Bluetooth, 18-inch wheels, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, USB ports, Wi-Fi hotspot, heated front seats, dual-zone climate control, navigation, moonroof, wireless charger, and reverse automatic braking.

All for a price tag of around $37K.

2020 Subaru Outback

In the end, the Outback remains what it always has been – a high-ground clearance (8.7 inches) wagon with an emphasis on utility and safety over performance. More-aggro styling and more guts don’t change that.

And that’s just fine (there is that word again). This is one of those “if it’s not broke, don’t fix it” situations. Outback buyers shop Subaru because of that emphasis on utility and safety, and the Outback still delivers.

Minor improvements to the infotainment system or a little more passing punch can’t hurt. But the formula works.

And it keeps one of the few wagons left on the road rolling strong.

[Images © 2021 Tim Healey/TTAC]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

72 Comments on “2020 Subaru Outback Onyx XT Edition – Keeping the Wagon Flame Going...”


  • avatar
    Fred

    Personally I don’t consider this a wagon. Especially since the 5 door Impreza still exists.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I consider it a tall wagon. I really have a hard time conceiving of it as a crossover or SUV.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        It’s not a wagon.

        When Outback stopped being a trim package and started being a separate model Subaru very consciously raised the ground clearance to get into SUV/CUV territory and take advantage of the regulatory advantages from CAFE and the DOT.

        And for God’s sake don’t call the Wilderness variant that’s coming a wagon. If that 2 tall joke is a wagon then so is a Suburban Z71

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          For those buyers who manage to resist the temptation to strap an Outdoorsy Lifestyle catalog’s worth of Instagram props to the roof, Subie’s focus on keeping the COG low, does help it drive more like a softly sprung, long travel wagon, than a more traditional CUV.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            +1 stuki – A relative & I took a ~1,500 mile road trip last summer, and I got a lot of wheel time in her Crosstrek. My takeaway was that the Subaru recipe isn’t just marketing hype. I really did prefer its manners to that of the typical CUV, and I think that came down to (1) COG and (2) its AWD system vs the typical transverse-engine “slip & grip” FWD/AWD system. More so the COG, though. (I’m not a FWD hater and usually have a “Hmm, worse in theory but actually OK in practice” take on transverse FWD platforms.)

            As to which Subarus are or aren’t CUVs, that’s not a semantic hill I’m going to die on. FWIW, the Crosstrek still strikes me as “Impreza with a lift kit and body kit,” so that model I wouldn’t call a CUV.

            And heaven help me, but I liked “Eyesight” enough that my first choice in the Subaru stable probably would be a CVT/Eyesight-equipped WRX. (I’ve always been a heavy cruise control user, but conversely most of my driving is in very heavy traffic.)

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          CUV=Wagon. Search your feelings Luke…you know it to be true.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      This is a wagon. The 5-door Impreza/Crosstrek is a hatchback.

      • 0 avatar
        Tim Healey

        The Crosstrek is also, in my mind, a raised wagon, but the case for hatch or crossover is a bit stronger.

        The problem is that the line between tall wagon and CUV is so nebulous. A few of you disagree with me that the Outback is a wagon. Is the Kia Niro a wagon? The Sorento? Wasn’t the Golf Alltrack, with similar ground clearance to the Outback, a wagon?

        • 0 avatar
          legacygt

          Until 2010 the Outback was a lifted Legacy wagon. There’s no question about that. Since then, we have seen 3 generations of Outback that are closer to a crossover than a car. Subaru saw the writing on the wall as the market shifted to crossovers. Previously the Legacy was the starting point and the Outback came from there. Now, the Outback is in the driver’s seat. There’s no Legacy wagon. And the Legacy sedan feels like the car version of an Outback rather than the other way around.

          • 0 avatar
            NTGD

            I think the 2010 Outback still looks like a lifted Legacy Wagon just with different bumpers, grill and black cladding instead of body color. Wish I could find a picture of the two side by side but no luck right off hand.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    The faster scooby doo.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “The words “fine” and “adequate” come to mind.”

    That’s like a 1000% improvement though.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      And sadly a conventional planetary automatic would turn that thing into a rocket ship. Get your head out of your rear Subaru.

      I agree with a couple of YouTube reviewers who said (with the exception of the BRZ and WRX) “Subaru is building cars for people who are actively afraid of driving.”

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Subaru is the new Volvo, while Volvo is the new Saab.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        haha – I just posted few days ago that as soon as snow hits, Subarus are the slowest cars on the road

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        “And sadly a conventional planetary automatic would turn that thing into a rocket ship.”

        I doubt it would improve 0-60 at all. It would just make people feel more like they were accelerating, because they would hear engine speed going up.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @dal – more than one reviewer has commented on the feeling of “delay” anytime they really needed a burst of acceleration. A feeling beyond the turbo spooling up

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I’d like to see an objective measurement comparing that delay with the delay that results from a conventional automatic kicking down. The kickdown feels like “more is happening,” so people don’t perceive it as a delay to the same extent.

            I read the other day that the Germans are purposely putting delay into their throttle response because their research showed that customers perceived instant responsiveness as roughness.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            If only there was some other option for a more engaging to drive transmission. One that left the shift speed solely up to the driver. If only.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        @ajla & PD – C&D wrung a 6.3 0-60 time out of the 2016 Forester XLT. That’s pretty darn quick in my world. I expect this model performs similarly. (I’m guessing it’s heavier but also has more power b/c of the increased displacement.)

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “2.4-liter turbocharged three-cylinder”

    ?????

  • avatar
    slavuta

    My experience with this car was – it is big, slow… I guess they removed the slow part with this engine. Ok. But DI+Turbo+Subaru Engine…
    Another thing – the car is big, but Subaru has this tendency to make the seat too short for a good thigh support. I measured my Mazda6 seat 1.5″ longer than much larger Outback front seat. That was on the previous model.
    And one more thing for me – on the lower level Trims, the upholstery is not very good. My Mazda6 has excellent upholstery. Great seats. You really want to have that Subaru badge to buy as I see it.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “You really want to have that Subaru badge to buy as I see it.”

      It’s like a Harley Davidson.

    • 0 avatar
      make_light

      Subaru finally fixed the seat problem with this generation. It was a plague affecting way too many of their cars, made me get rid of my 2016 Forester.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Now I also remember – they had a problem of rear seatback being too vertical and not reclining in one of the early versions of Outback. Was a complete discomfort. Similar to latest Mazda3/cx30.
        And I tried Crosstrek – rear seatting surface was for kids.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      It’s a family car for long trips including into snow country. It don’t see a problem with it.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      How about this:
      I own a 2007 Legacy GT wagon and never had any problems with discomfort in the seat. It’s definitely firm, but my legs never have had any trouble.

      My wife bought a 2009 Legacy GT and I drove it home about 2 hours once we picked it up. After about 20 minutes my thighs started aching really badly and I could not get comfortable. I had the same trouble with it as long as she owned it. As far as I can tell they are the exact same seats. I have no idea why hers caused me problems but mine doesn’t.

      Now she has a Forester XT and I feel like I am sitting in a high chair in the artificially tall seats. And they are much more firm and not terribly inviting for long trips. No thigh issues though.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Don’t forget your dog and flannel shirt…….

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Surprised that you reviewed an Outback without once mentioning the integrated roof rail/crossbar system, which is half the reason that a lot of the buyers buy an Outback. It first appeared in 2010, and here we are a decade later and no one has tried to copy it, despite the ongoing vogue for adventuresome cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I don’t have the kinda gear I’d need to evaluate it. Not sure anyone on staff who regularly reviews cars does.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Not many 60-year olds are hoisting 50-lbs cruisers above their shoulders!

      According to J.D. Power research, Outback buyers are 60 years of age, on average, compared with the typical Midsize SUV buyer, who is 55 years old. In fact, 72% of Outback buyers are members of the Boomer (those born between 1946 and 1964) or Pre-Boomer (prior to 1946) generations, compared with 57% of Midsize SUV buyers. Gender splits 41% women for the Subaru, compared with 42% for Midsize SUVs

      • 0 avatar
        johnds

        Norm I can’t wait until the new 2023 Buick Century debuts. Per Honda and GMs agreement, it will be a Honda Civic based compact with a few extras the Buick crowd likes such as large dials, bench seat, rack and pinion steering.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I’m not quite sure how the Outback integrated roof rail is any different than the 4Runners or the H2/H3 from 15-18 years ago?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Integrated retractable crossbars. If you have narrow rooftop accessories, you can use those and not have to mount/unmount the crossbars every time you remove the accessories (or leave them on and have them be ugly and hurt your fuel economy). You can also still use conventional separate crossbars if you have wider accessories like a two-kayak rack.

        It’s a neat system and I find it really puzzling that other brands haven’t copied it.

  • avatar
    make_light

    Sometimes I understand why Subarus get such a lukewarm reception around here, but I feel like you didn’t quite do this car justice. It’s hard to imagine a better family vehicle under $40k than this… exceptionally smooth, spacious, quiet, safe, and more interesting than most of the similarly priced CUVs available. Maybe not exciting to drive, but at least Subarus handle predictably and securely. They’ve also come a long way in quietness and refinement in recent years, and vehicles like the Legacy and Forester now certainly surpass their comparable Japanese models in NVH. I feel like they don’t get enough credit for that.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I am not sure how I didn’t do it justice. I pointed out it’s not super fun to drive but that’s OK because it’s not really supposed to be. It’s really good at accomplishing its mission. My biggest beef was that the infotainment system is a bit outdated — though no worse than Toyota — and the driver-distraction feature needs more time in the oven.

      It’s not a bad car. Just not, as you say, exciting.

      • 0 avatar
        make_light

        Well, you used three sentences to discuss ride and handling. I’d consider ride quality, refinement, and overall solidity at the top of the class, when compared to similar family vehicles under 40k. You called it “fine” and then moved on.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      @ Make light

      I agree.
      Some People dis like Subaru products. I like them.
      IE- Outback. One of the highest rated cars on ConsumerReports. 90 Score.
      Best Resale
      Best Crash safety
      Best Quality.
      And NOT A TOYOTA OR A HONDA!

      All bonuses that overcome the meh talked about in the above negative comments

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Under $40K Highlander easily beats Outback. If you fold 3rd row, which I never use, this is a little longer (by 2 inches) CUV but way more powerful, smoother, etc. And considering that Outback AWD is a watered down system which Highlander easily matches…
      What do you think?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    No boxers for me, but the dash/console isn’t bad.

    Given the environmentally-oriented Subaru image, it’s ironic that their vehicles are so heavy and thirsty, and they don’t offer an EV.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I read CVT, I stopped reading.

    These don’t need manual transmissions, although offering the option would be nice. These DO need a cog swapping automatic though. CVTs still suck, although they suck much less than they did 8 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Subaru irritates me because I feel like the elements of greatness are there.

      Imagine the Legacy XT with a regular automatic or a manual and a torque vectoring AWD system. Now undercut Acura on price.

      Mmmmmmmm

  • avatar
    Dan

    1. The overlap between aggro blackout package and a car for – THE car for – people who are actively scared to drive seems to me that it would be literally zero.

    2. The CVT and pudding suspension throw away all of the wagon dynamic advantages at the same time that the 5’2 roofline throws away all of the CUV ergonomic advantages.

    3. $40,000 is all manner of nice cars that the pussyhatted wouldn’t appreciate but in the coastally approved family segment it’s also a Passport and virtue signaling aside they’d all be happier in that one.

  • avatar
    1998S90

    Two thoughts:
    1. These are starting to look like every other CUV on the market,
    2. CVT…

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    This is the most obnoxious statement I’ve read in a car review:
    Let’s start with the turbo. While it adds 111 lb-ft of torque and 78 ponies over the base 2.5-liter naturally aspirated boxer four it doesn’t exactly make the Outback swift. You won’t struggle in most situations, including merging, but you won’t blow anyone’s hair back, either. The words “fine” and “adequate” come to mind.

    I drive the Ascent which is what 900 lbs heavier than Outback? The engine sounds like a V8 around town and can hit 100 mph in a hurry that I haven’t seen in my Acura or pretty much anything else I can recall aside from a 5-series. It absolutely punches any time I want and is far beyond just adequate. It can jump from 70 away from any truck tailgating you and hit 90 before they downshift they 10-speed.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I am amazed, truly amazed, that perhaps for the first time in recent memory no sordid stories of leaking head gaskets, failed wheel bearings, poor reliability rants, and melted CV joint boots have been posted in the comments for more than the 24 hours since the original article. Are several of the members of the B&B ill or out of internet range?

  • avatar

    I had to leave my 2015 Forester XT at the shop over night, so Subaru loaned me a stripped Ascent, same motor as the Onyx. I found it to be adequate. I was hopeful for the same shove I have in my turbo forester, but only found it to be fine, and ponderous/lumbering handling on the freeway. Those fake cvt shifts tho, wow, lets make that a trend that disappears. In a turbo powered vehicle, with a limited power-band, seems flat-footing it, should just keep the power-plant at optimum power-output, and turbo spooled. Fake shifts…do not(do the previous). I’d have to also agree with the others here, there isn’t much in a name between tall wagon, and “crossover” in the US. One sells in the US, the other sells in the UK…on name alone. The global marketing dept just realized the US will have it if it has “Crossover” in the name, and you lift it up a couple inches. Personally, I prefer to sit higher, and be surrounded by a lotta greenhouse, and hatches make a lot of use out of the space you have. So, I hope this trend continues. Also, just as an aside, I believe I’ll be following the “Volvo owners from the 70’s buy Subaru’s, and Subaru owners are buying Tesla’s” …trend. I think unless Subaru can make something electric soon, my next vehicle will be a Model Y.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      “Those fake cvt shifts tho, wow, lets make that a trend that disappears.” Amen, joevwgti. What’s stunning to me, though, is that most scribes seem to like it and, furthermore, base their verdict of “bad CVT or acceptable CVT?” almost solely on that aspect. At least give drivers a mode choice so that they can opt out of the fake shifts.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Got a ’21 base in February after I lost my ’02 Outback to a Chinese timing belt tensioner that was installed 33k miles before. As a performance guy, I obviously considered the turbo version. That’s what all the car mags and cool kid YouTubers are pushing. I mean, I don’t think I’ve even seen a ’20-21 base engine review honestly. But you have to move up to the Onyx to get it and that model has an MSRP that’s $8,400 more than the base.

    If it was a 2k difference, sure. But 8.4k? No way. That just isn’t worth it to me in this type of car. The base engine is peppy enough day-to-day and it gets the job done, and gets a 27.5 MPG average with a lot of urban use on regular. I have a Veloster N if I want to go fast.

  • avatar
    TooManyCars

    I’ve been driving a 2021 OB XT for nearly 3 months now after a stolen car destroyed my ’18 Forester XT. The Outback is not a perfect car, none are, but in terms of driving dynamics, build quality, and interior materials it is as good or better than the Highlander, Pilot, and Escape that I cross-shopped. Also cheaper when optioned similarly, at least in Canuckistan.

    The Outback XT is rigid, quiet, and very comfortable to drive. It is also considerably quicker than most of the competition at 5.9 seconds 0-60 (Motor Trend, FWIW) and quite entertaining to accelerate around corners while the torque vectoring does it’s thing. To find the acceleration merely adequate Tim must be accustomed to driving seriously quick cars. I’m envious.

    The CVT works just fine. Under hard acceleration it has 8 steps which mimic a multi-speed planetary transmission – without the annoying gear hunting that plagues some of those devices. Biggest benefit of the CVT is on the highway, where the CVT seamlessly chooses ratios as the terrain changes.

    I have no hesitation calling it a wagon. Compared to the taller Honda and Toyota products I drove, it leans much less in corners and feels much more planted. It actually is quite fun to drive, which cannot be said about most new SUV’s.

    I do have some nits with the car: the electric nannies are sometimes annoying, though a new software update will make it easier to turn at least one of them off. Placing the seat heater controls 2 menus deep is also dumb, Subaru. Finally, the throttle tip-in is not linear; it takes more movement at the beginning of the gas peddle stroke to make things happen than it does when your foot is well into it.

    All-in-all I am quite happy with the OB. I do sometimes miss the hooligan antics of my turbo Forester, but the smoother (and faster) acceleration of the OB, along with the far superior ride and rigidity are a fair trade-off, in my opinion.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I wasn’t prepared to like this vehicle very much. I got it because I needed it, not because I wanted it. And anybody who has read any of my posts here knows I am not a fan of SUVs or CUVs at all. That’s why I got the cheapest Ace of Base edition that I could find.

      But I really like this vehicle. It’s a lot more endearing than I expected and really does the job of daily commuting very well. I’m sure the turbo would be better, and I’m not bashing it. I just don’t think it is worth $8,400 more given that the base Boxer motor is pretty good in this application.

  • avatar
    ajla

    This seems pretty slow for the price you’re paying.

    caranddriver.com/reviews/a28531970/2020-subaru-outback-drive/

    It isn’t a dangerous situation or anything but I think Outback owners should be honest that they’re happy as long as they can outrun the garbage truck rather than try to twist around that either engine turns in above average performance for 2021.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      The article says 0-60 in 8.5 seconds and quarter mile in 16.7 seconds for the base 182 horsepower 2.5 liter engine. That’s about the same as a 1977-80 Z28 with the LM1 350 and 1978-79 Trans Am with the Olds 403. You people are so spoiled now I swear, LOL!

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Performance sucked in the late 70s. “It goes like a Disco Era muscle car” is fair assessment though. If that’s what you’re looking for.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          I was just looking for a utility vehicle with adequate acceleration, which is what this has. Disco Era muscle car acceleration is adequate acceleration today, which is fine for this type of car. If I wanted a performance wagon it wouldn’t be in the form of a turbo Outback. I think few if any Outback owners would claim their car is a performance car.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “I think few if any Outback owners would claim their car is a performance car.”

            I’m seeing a few counterexamples in this comment section.

            For present day, I’d personally say the XT is “adequate” while the 2.5L is “below average but not dangerous”. YMMV.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            Yeah, I’d say I’d agree. Not dangerous. Not fast. Adequate is a good word for it really. If some want to think their turbo makes this high riding utility vehicle a performance model, well, cool. I think if performance is one’s primary focus, there are many better options. But this car fulfills its mission very well.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Inside Looking Out: Design is a one reason why I will not buy any Honda any time soon.
  • ToolGuy: I read this as Timberland and I got excited and then I thought maybe Justin Timberlake and I got *really*...
  • Inside Looking Out: Like Ford did with Mazda. Not that I compare Mazda with DB. Hell, why not. Mazda is also premium...
  • Inside Looking Out: No V6? Then how many miles it goes fully charged?
  • 2ACL: @FreedMike #ReasonsSheIsMyEx – Good call. I don’t expect a woman to be mechanical guru, but when...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber