By on December 23, 2020

Seniors go digital

Seniors, the Silent Generation and Baby Boomers alike, have adopted new retail habits. Large gains in digital spending have largely been a result of the pandemic, although many who have embraced these changes will likely stick with them post-pandemic.

Digital spending has been growing for awhile, but e-commerce penetration by boomers and the Silent Generation have expanded the consumer base. According to eMarketer, 47 percent of internet-using baby boomers increased their digital spend as of May. The pandemic forced older consumers who were slower to adapt and give up their normal shopping routines to forego driving to the supermarket and elsewhere.

Seniors go digital

Increases in digital spending habits also occurred in conjunction with other digital adoptions. Since the beginning of the pandemic, research has found substantial growth in social media use and streaming among these older consumers, a strong sign that seniors are welcoming these changes. COVID-19 forced many older consumers to consider new practices, such as online grocery shopping and using Amazon. In a National Retail Federation survey of the two-thirds of Baby Boomers who have tried online-ordering and in-store pick-up, 63 percent claimed this hybrid buying method improved their overall shopping experience. When asked why they tried it, 62 percent said they did it to avoid shipping fees, versus 35 percent who tried it due to social distancing.

Social commerce will play a bigger role in brand and product discovery for discretionary goods. Growing familiarity with grocery e-commerce will push this habit forward, according to eMarketer.

Increased digital adoption isn’t the only factor to be considered. Seniors will weather the recession far better than younger generations. In a survey done by Edward Jones and Age Wave, 24 percent of Gen-Xers and nearly a third of millennials and Gen-Zers said they considered COVID-19 to have an extremely or very negative impact on their personal finances, compared to only 16 percent of Baby Boomers and 6 percent of the Silent Generation. Financial factors such as less debt, low or no mortgage payments, fewer dependents, and less income volatility were among the largest contributors.

Seniors also hold a disproportionate amount of total U.S. household wealth, which is why if brands want to survive the current economic downturn, now would be the opportune time to reconnect with an older consumer base.

[Images: AARP]

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81 Comments on “Seniors Adopt Digital and Drive Less...”


  • avatar
    Cicero

    Well, I do see the word “drive” in this post.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    My wife and I are in our seventies. Except for essentials, we go nowhere. It’s too dangerous. Most of our trips are to the grocery store (delivery isn’t offered) or to the doctor or pharmacy. I haven’t been to a barber since January and we haven’t eaten a restaurant meal since February. Our vehicles are overdue for service because I don’t want to risk contamination of the interior by an infected mechanic. Our most frequent trip is to visit our horse at the boarding stable where we are unlikely to meet anyone else.

    After moving to the mountains of eastern Arizona a year ago, we expected to spend much of our time exploring our new state. However, because of the pandemic, most of the places we want to visit are closed or should be. We are looking forward to getting immunized against COVID-19 so that we can resume going places even if we have to continue wearing masks and keeping our distance.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I’m in my seventies too, but I don’t go to such extremes. Are you and/or your wife high-risk? That would explain your self isolation.

      I’m pretty healthy and active, and don’t have any complicating health conditions. I’ve been taking vitamin-D and zinc regularly for several years to reduce exposure to the flu, and it works for covid too.

      In any event, delaying auto maintenance because a healthy young grease monkey might contaminate your car is going way overboard. In my experience, the worst contamination a mechanic could deposit in your car would be a burrito fart.

      As I said, if you are at high risk, taking precautions are prudent, but the precautions should be reasonable. Covid is a respiratory virus, not the plague. It’s fairly well-known by now, is treatable, and there’s now a vaccine.

      I hope you’ll re-assess your safety measures and adjust them to the degree of risk that’s appropriate.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        It’s also potentially fatal, especially if you are over 60, and even more if you’re over 70. Beyond “respiratory”, it attacks other essential organs as well. This is not something to be pooh-poohed.
        The oil change can wait a while, especially if the car isn’t being driven much.

        Here’s a bit more information about what Covid-19 does, courtesy of WebMD, beyond the usual pneumonia, fever, difficulty breathing, nausea, etc., which you won’t ever hear on AM talk radio:

        Pinkeye
        Rashes
        Liver problems or damage
        Heart problems
        Kidney damage
        Dangerous blood clots, including in the legs, lungs, and arteries. Some clots may cause a stroke.

        Researchers are looking into reports of mouth sores and skin rashes, including reddish-purple spots on fingers or toes.

        In general, children don’t get as sick with coronavirus as adults do, but they can be infected and it can also be deadly for them. A few children and teens have been admitted to the hospital with an inflammatory syndrome that may be linked to the new coronavirus. Symptoms include a fever, rash, belly pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and heart problems. The syndrome, now being referred to as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C is similar to toxic shock or to Kawasaki disease, a condition in children that causes inflammation in blood vessels. We’re still learning about these cases.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          One of the major reasons I would like to avoid the virus is the potential for neurological effects.

          Real-life example: An OCD [obsessive-compulsive disorder] person starts forgetting important appointments after a bout with COVID; her healthcare providers loosely refer to this as “COVID brain”.

          One article:
          https://tinyurl.com/ycooavh2

          (My brain has enough issues already.)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Christ on a bike.

            Q: How long do neurological symptoms from COVID-19 last?

            A: Brain fog in COVID-19 is still being studied, but with other critical conditions that affect the brain, we know that a third of people will have complete recovery with no issues. Roughly another third will have lingering effects that improve after therapy and time, and then another third may have permanent effects, especially in cases where the patient has been intubated, has had multiple organ failure or has been under anesthesia for a while.

            If someone is going to improve, they should improve within 3 to 6 months after recovering from the infection. If they don’t recover within 6 to 12 months, it’s likely that they’ll be dealing with this life long

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @28-Cars-Later – There can be persistent neurological symptoms for anyone without covid-19 “in cases where the patient has been intubated, has had multiple organ failure or has been under anesthesia for a while.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            What is “a while” defined as?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @28 – I’d say at least a few weeks but people respond differently. Multi-organ failure isn’t going to do the brain any favours. Sedation effects can be minimized by “sedation vacations” i.e. deliberately backing off sedation a bit everyday to allow the patient to wake up a bit then re-sedate.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Kendahl–My wife and I don’t go anywhere except to doctors, grocery, and pharmacy. I am 1 year away from retirement and my wife and I are looking at relocating to Phoenix or Tucson. We are also looking forward to getting the Covid-19 vaccine.

    • 0 avatar
      2manycars

      Excellent. You be the guinea pigs. We’ll check back on you from time to time to see what the hastily-developed and poorly-tested vaccine that you are looking forward to does to you. Keep in mind that you cannot sue the vaccine makers for bad side effects.

      https://www.ericpetersautos.com/2020/12/23/just-trust-em-because-you-cant-sue-em/

      For myself, despite being well over “retirement age” I will not cower in fear of a disease that for otherwise healthy people has a mortality rate of under 1/2 of 1%.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Stop making sense.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          28-Cars-Later,

          You have to think beyond yourself. People die every day! Stay home — under the bed preferably. When the pols (who have no interest but our well being) tell you it is “safe” to come out (the not so great reset having been resetted) then you can venture forth as long as you have your stupid smart phone with the correct dingleberry proclaiming that you did your part for humanity and got the vaccine.

          Disease hoaxes this good don’t come along all the time. So, please, play along, and muzzle up.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        ” the hastily-developed and poorly-tested vaccine that you are looking forward to does to you”

        The basic MRNA platform has under development for years. It’s not really a new vaccine. It’s been under development since the early 1990’s. They just plugged in the dna from COVID-19 into the platform. The politicians like to say it was done in a year, but the underlying technology has been under development for over 28 years.

        You have to think beyond yourself. As an individual, maybe your chances of actually getting it or contracting it might be low, but you have to consider the fact you could infect other people potentially killing them and if you get it and don’t die, the resources you consume receiving treatment. We’re already seeing the health care system getting taxed to near it’s breaking point in some areas. People have to stop thinking about themselves and consider others.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I think confidence in this vaccine is in major trouble. The press, politicians, talking heads, and certain doctors from both political sides were casting doubt on things throughout the year and it had a definite impact. This may change and it’s just anecdata, but I don’t know of anyone that plans to take it voluntarily and even with Jacobson v. Massachusetts existing I don’t expect states will strap people down and force them to take it.

          I got a Tdap and flu shot this year, and I’ve taken several vaccines during my life, but I’ll be honest and admit that I’m nervous about both the side effects and the overall effectiveness of what was approved.

          • 0 avatar
            chaparral

            I’m still up to receive the vaccine on the first day I can get it without lying about who I am.

            I’m 35, and if I got COVID, I would miss two weeks of work, mostly unpaid, and be worried about losing my job for irresponsible behavior.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @mcs:

          Now THAT’s common sense.

          Maybe the OP or his spouse has had cancer, or heart disease, or one of the scores of illnesses that make COVID deadly. Did this 2manycars guy ask about any of that? Nope. He was too busy trying to impress everyone with how special and smart he is (and sending us to a website I’d put good money being his, where one can sample all of his rantings).

          Well, smart guy, newsflash…if you’re elderly, and you have other health problems, COVID is a killer. Not convinced? Ask my ex’s dad (my kids’ grandpa, by the way) what happens when you have heart disease and catch COVID. All you need is a Quija board – COVID took him down last month.

          If you’re elderly, or you have other health problems, staying the f**k away from COVID is the ONLY common sense way to deal with it.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            FreedMike,

            Yup, if you are elderly or have certain serious conditions covid, the flu, or even a bad cold can be deadly.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Old_WRX – I’ve never seen or even heard of someone dying of a cold who also had severe comorbidities or is elderly. Flu’s yes. Colds no.

            I just read that 2,900 healthcare workers have died of COVID-19 in the USA. Many were healthy and young.

            I’ve seen people die of ARDS. It isn’t a fate I’d wish on anyone.

            Do you fish?

            Ever watch a fish gasp and gasp and gasp in the bottom of your boat?

            People do that same thing when starved for oxygen , even when on a ventilator. It is knicknamed “guppy breathing”. Medically, it’s called agonal respirations.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          mcs,

          Yea, I gonna trust mRNA vaccine. Wonderful. I would rather get Russian Adenovirus based. Wouldn’t let anyone F#####g with my DNA.
          Thanks a lot.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            slavuta,

            “Wouldn’t let anyone F#####g with my DNA.”

            Now, just calm down and roll up your sleeve like an adult (=terrorized child).

            C’mon, be a sport. What’s the worst that could happen?

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            It’s not messing with your DNA. As far as Putin goes, I understand he has a very special vaccine for expatriots.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        New Flu vaccines are made every year using similar technology. Corona viruses have been studied for the past 17 years when SARS first hit. We’ve also had MERS. All are similar to SARS-COV-2.
        As far as mortality rates of “healthy” people, over 1/2 of Americans fall in a higher risk category. Age alone plays a factor in mortality rates. Anyone over 60 is going to be higher risk.
        Only a fool would ignore the advice of medical professionals. A country needs at least 70% of the population vaccinated to reach herd immunity. If that doesn’t happen then one might as well get accustomed to seeing 1,000’s of people die per week.

        • 0 avatar
          Sobro

          Only a fool would ignore the advice of medical professionals? Like Dr. Fauci?

          On March 8, he described lockdown measures in China as “draconian” and stated that such restrictions wouldn’t be “feasible” in the U.S., more than a month after the World Health Organization had declared a global health emergency on Jan. 30.

          Days later on March 15, he changed positions and said he was open to a national 14-day shutdown to help stop the spread. In April, when pressed in a CNN interview on why social distancing and lockdowns weren’t implemented sooner, he sparked confusion when he said more lives “obviously” could have been saved if there hadn’t been “pushback” to lockdowns at the start of the pandemic. The very next day, he backtracked, saying that he used “the wrong choice of words.”

          In September, Fauci testified that he did not “regret” saying that the only way to stop the “explosion of infection” was by “shutting down.”

          Perhaps Fauci’s most notable flip-flop has been on the efficacy of masks, saying in March that there was “no reason” to wear a mask. By April, he joined the chorus of doctors and health agencies encouraging the use of face masks.

          Fauci also previously downplayed the virus itself, something Trump was harshly criticized for, saying in February that the public should not be “frightened.” By March, he was singing a different tune, warning people that they needed to do their part to stop the spread and take the virus seriously.

          He also downplayed asymptomatic transmission on Jan. 28, saying what “people need to realize” is that in “all the history” of respiratory-borne viruses, asymptomatic transmission has never been the driver of outbreaks. By August, Fauci did a complete 180, saying asymptomatic cases were a driving factor in the community spread of COVID-19 despite a WHO admission that more evidence was needed to make this determination. In late August, researchers from Southern Medical University in Guangzhou concluded that “asymptomatic cases were least likely to infect their close contacts.”

          https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/here-are-faucis-biggest-flip-flops-and-backtracks-amid-the-coronavirus-pandemic

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @Sobro:

            Dr. Fauci?

            https://www.factcheck.org/2020/05/outdated-fauci-video-on-face-masks-shared-out-of-context/

            I’ve actually been in the room for an investigation into what was potentially a deadly virus spreading undetected as a data analyst. Turns out it wasn’t, but we had to assume the worst at the beginning. There were lots of good theories thrown out at the beginning, but most of them proved to be wrong. Why were some of these experts wrong? It was because early on there was a lot of information we didn’t have. As more was learned about the problem, causes were ruled out including the viral theories. It involved a lot of research with samples being sent to the Mayo for specialized tests. But, eventually, we found the cause. It was scary at first. You don’t just walk into the room with everyone making totally accurate statements. Theories change as more is learned. In fact, you’re trying to come up with every possible cause knowing full well most theories will be wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “You don’t just walk into the room with everyone making totally accurate statements. Theories change as more is learned. In fact, you’re trying to come up with every possible cause knowing full well most theories will be wrong.”

            This is reasonable. However, I’m also guessing you didn’t go the general media with your working theories.

            The “noble lie” about masks was a massive blunder by Fauci and the American medical community. Saying “we’re still researching the effectiveness of masks in relation to a new disease” would have been the correct thing to say not the “don’t wear a mask unless you are symptomatic” message we were given.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            The only thing I don’t know about Fauci today, is WHY is he still exists?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Sobro – your source is heavily biased to the right and also does not rate well for accuracy.
            But hey, as long as it fits your world view!

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          Lou_BC,

          “I’ve never seen or even heard of someone dying of a cold who also had severe comorbidities or is elderly.”

          The fact that I do not buy the current epidemic hoax is not the same thing as saying I want everyone to die a miserable death.

          Yes I have watched a fish gasping for breath I have also had the non-pleasure of watching my wife gasping for breath far too many times. I have also been careful for many years because my wife is one of those people who would die from the flu, or (if it exists) this covid thing, or, yup, from a severe cold. (A cold is an upper respiratory infection. They probably don’t die directly from the cold, but the cold can make a fine entry point for worse stuff.)

          So, please, stop assuming that, because I don’t believe the Covid hype is at all warranted, that I want everyone to die a miserable death. That is not what I wish for people.

          You are being scammed by you government. I am not the one doing that scamming. I do not wish anyone to die a miserable death. But, noticing that we are being scammed, DOES NOT MAKE SOMEONE A MONSTER, PERIOD!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Old_WRX – I work in Healthcare. SARS-COV-2 and the disease it causes COVID-19 is not a scam. One of my colleagues has a daughter who’s a nurse in ICU. Recently a friend had her mother-in-law die of COVID-19. I know several people with family or friends die of it.

            Just because you think it’s a scam doesn’t change the fact that it’s real.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Old_WRX

            *wearing my tinfoil hat*

            It is very real and people are dying. I know not only from data I have access too but the fact everything happening around it could not transpire without it being a real disease. We need to take reasonable precautions and support medical staff/first responders. But at the same time we have to examine the events of this year, how they actually came about, and why they were brought about going into 2021 because none of this is coincidence.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            …You are being scammed by you government. I am not the one doing that scamming. I do not wish anyone to die a miserable death. But, noticing that we are being scammed, DOES NOT MAKE SOMEONE A MONSTER, PERIOD!…

            So what does the government gain by making a “fake pandemic”? A huge deficit?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @golden2husky

            Well, yeah. But this operation provides cover for:

            -Slow implementation of a totalitarian state through digital control mechanisms.

            -Pushing elements of the Green New Deal to further deindustrialize the US.

            -Furthering the divide between the three post 2000 social cohorts of 1%, 9%, 90%.

            -UBI for the 90% until it is decided what to do with them.

            -Food shortages due to Grand Solar Minimum.

            -Lifestyle changes due to Peak Oil.

            -Excuse for mail in fraud, err ballots in US elections.

            -Excuse for past and future riots with most of the population still being indoors or away from the major riot scenes.

            -Excuse to implement this new “vaccine” type of MRNA on a mass audience.

      • 0 avatar
        Kendahl

        “….a disease that for otherwise healthy people has a mortality rate of under 1/2 of 1%.” The problem is that, like many people my age, I’m not “otherwise healthy”. A severe case of COVID-19, from which a young person would probably recover, is likely to kill me. The same is true for influenza except there is a vaccine for that which I make sure to get. Until it’s my turn for one of the COVID-19 vaccines, my only defense is to avoid exposure to the disease. (The more people reject vaccination, the sooner my turn will come.)

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        slavuta,

        “Have you seen this?”

        Now, I have. He smelled something that didn’t smell right. Maybe just an issue with the cleaning staff.(?)

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Lou_BC,

      “Just because you think it’s a scam doesn’t change the fact that it’s real [sic].”

      Just because I believe it is a scam doesn’t make it a scam. And, conversely, just because you think it’s real doesn’t make it real. As I recall that is the way reality works.

      The CDC’s own statistics will tell you it isn’t what the MSM is claiming. I haven’t checked the number since September. The numbers then, as I recall, were MSM Covid19 Deaths: ~190,000; CDC Covid19 Deaths (from CDC.gov)(without comorbidities — the pre CV19 CDC’s way of counting…) ~1900. The CDC even changed their instructions for filling out death certificates SPECIFICALLY for CV — CV19 death statistics are not being reported by the same rules that pre CV19 deaths were — classic apples to oranges… Comparing statistics compiled by different methods is, at best, inaccurate, at worst, intentionally deceptive.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “just because you think it’s real doesn’t make it real.”

        Seriously? What the f¥ck?

        What part of “I work in Healthcare” don’t you understand?

        I’m currently trained to deal with ebola level health risks. I’ve worked ICU for 10 years.

        It’s real.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @Lou

          On the subject of Ebola, in your view what are the chances of a serious outbreak in North America? I was quite concerned in Fall 2014 but was relived when the health authorities got things under control.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @28- ebola might show up in North America eventually but I doubt it would be a huge problem. We have better hygiene across the board and our death “rituals” are different. That alone reduces the risk.

            A disease that kills 50-80% of those who contract it will also be taken much more seriously by the populace.

            I’m not sure what the USA has in place. In Canada, after the last ebola outbreak it was made a mandatory requirement that any healthcare facility have a “high risk infectious disease” team. I volunteered for the team.

            The problem with politicians is that they don’t worry about anything beyond their political lifespans. Canada had to deal with SARS but let any updating of supplies or training lapse. We should have been better at dealing with SARS-COV-2 since it’s related to SARS. The USA under Trump took “outbreak” prep too lightly and dismantled their unit.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Here’s an article about where the next pandemic will probably come from:

            https://www.ft.com/content/2a80e4a2-7fb9-4e2c-9769-bc0d98382a5c

            The good news is that we now have the MRNA platform. We should be able to adapt it to just about anything that comes along. Future MRNA based vaccines might only take a couple of months to get out the door. You can also make a MRNA platform vaccine that can immunize against multiple viruses.

            There is also ongoing research to increase immunity in older adults. It’s promising, but there is still a lot of work to do.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Lou

            Thanks. Given its method of transmission and known mortality rate, I would think yes taken much more seriously and even more devastating economically speaking.

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          @Lou_BC,

          If I am looking for illegal drugs, I dramatically increase my chances by looking inside a prison.

          If I am looking for MRSA (methicillin-resistant staph infection), I dramatically increase my chances by looking inside a hospital.

          Why is that?

          [I realize that you dropped The F Bomb and that should End All Discussion and I do apologize for Not Observing the Conventions of Internet Discussion]

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @toolguy – there are 2 genetic strains of MRSA. One was originated in the community and the other in healthcare facilities. It doesn’t change treatment. It just points out where it originated.
            The reason why you see it in Healthcare more often is because (at least in BC’s system) we screen for it. Staphylococcus aureus is a normal flora on at least 25% of people. It doesn’t usually make healthy people sick. Methicillin’s are just a common class of antibiotics that used to treat staph infections. They were overused and staph mutated to survive. Chronically ill people are usually more prone to infections.
            Since people who are immunocompromised, have had surgeries, and/or have severe comorbidities tend to end up in a hospital, you are more likely to see it.
            I dropped the “F bomb” out of frustration because someone said COVID-19 is a scam but I see it and so do my colleagues.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @toolguy – You are implying that I see more COVID-19 because I’m in healthcare.

            I pointed out that I know people who have had family or friends die of it.

            I currently don’t work in a hospital but I see it in my patients at a rate the reflects the current frequency in the general population.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            @Lou_BC,

            Thank you for your reasoned and logical response (the first one) – seriously.

            I was not intending to make any implications about COVID-19 (your second response). I don’t question the reality of the virus, and I am taking active steps to be sure my family avoids it if at all possible. [See my post above re: neurological effects.] It is hot on my heels at the moment where I live.

            I tossed the MRSA thing out there as a challenge to the idea that healthcare workers are infallible. The current healthcare system (where I am) does some things exceptionally well, but has some significant shortcomings in other areas.

            Thank you for your service as a healthcare provider – I enjoy reading your posts and appreciate your perspective.

            [Am also genuinely curious about the ‘drugs in prison’ thing and how that works, if anyone has any insight.]

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @ToolGuy – thanks. My apologies for the 2nd post.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Typical death rates are predictable. An entire industry make a fortune selling life insurance because of the solidity of the data. For the first six months of the pandemic, there were 75,000 extra deaths that were unaccounted for when you added Covid deaths plus the expected death toll for that period. Other behaviors – like driving – were reduced (remember those rebate checks?) so why the extra deaths? Clearly Covid deaths are under-reported. There is no other explanation, but weigh in if I missed some event that would kill an extra 75K people..

        Trust in the government is lacking because of the incredible lack of consistency in the message. Mask or not? Got it that they wanted to save the limited stock for the health care providers, but the original message was that they were unnecessary. Undoing that became difficult expectantly when it became a political statement. Remember after 9/11? We were told that the air was safe. Yet I watched in the sunlight between buildings air filled with fibers, much like seeing dust in the sun through a window in your home. Obviously we were lied to because the worry was Wall Street (Wow! What a surprise) not our health. Had the vaccine come out a week before Election Day, the left would say rushed and not tested enough. A few weeks after Election Day and the Trump supporters are saying they won’t take it.

        Covid is now the #1 killer in America. If somebody is still saying its just an over glorified seasonal flu, just walk away – you can’t fix stupid. When they lose a loved one, maybe they will wake the f$^* up.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      28cars,

      “It is very real and people are dying.”

      If it is real, the MSM, etc. have done an incredible screw up. The reporting has been bizarre. The CDC’s changing their instructions for filling out death certificates confounds.

      Yes, it is patently obvious that the events of 2020 are coordinated and have ulterior motivates. (Sorry, deniers.) Taking them at surface value simply doesn’t work.

      Frankly, as far as my own actions go, it doesn’t matter one bit if it is true or not — it is flu season and I live with someone who has a compromised immune system; no mask and the pimple faced clerk at the store goes gonzo, so I wear it. I find the masks, though, to be no more than annoyance. Even if they could be of value, the way I see them being used is so sloppy that they can’t be of much if any use. No competent medical facility would just hand someone PPE without providing proper instruction in its use. One thing that leaves little doubt about the weirdness of the mask edicts is that they tell us they are not to protect the wearer, but, rather, to protect people from the wearer. And, I have never heard one peep from our vaunted experts about the fact that to serve that purpose the mask must not have an exhalation valve — which, of course, lets the wearer’s breath/aerosols out unfiltered… I have seen, by now, hundreds of people with masks with exhalation valve(s).

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The mission of State media was to instill fear and legitimize irrational behavior and illegal state orders. In this regard, they have wildly succeeded. Regarding conflicting statements and instructions, it is clear many top level leaders were not in on the initial plandemic (likely it was similar to the Patriot Act, a draft of it originally written in 1993 and shelved). This is evidenced by the Surgeon General’s comments on stop buying masks and Fauci’s comments of he believing what was being implemented in China could not be done in the US (both did an about face rather quickly). I speculate its still mostly on a need to know basis and once they were told that little bit, things changed accordingly. Another facet of this is simply the fog of war. The lower level people writing the instructions or managing things on the ground in say a health dept, are reacting to changes or what is still a fluid situation. People at this level are likely not being told much so they do their best with the information they have.

        I’m not sure what the masks are really about, could simply be placebo or an exercise to see who is -and is not- compliant but others have speculated wild things from some part of a satantic ritual, to symbolism of being slaves and beyond. I do see the totalitarianism emerging around the mask issue, and perhaps its true purpose is to bring about that behavior in general (from the citizenry, not gov’t).

        After 9/11 and around the time of the Iraqi invasion of 2003, smart people of many ilks all agreed civil liberties were important and the Patriot Act would/was infringing upon them. The bulk of the population attacked these people as unpatriotic and State media largely buried the stories. Twenty years on its very obvious we all got played. They passed the Patriot Act -and a visible national security state- and its held up in the courts. They invaded Iraq purely for oil and then *withdrew* after hundreds of thousands of deaths and $6T spent, all for nothing. The only times I recall State media attacking the Iraq operation was leading up to the 2004 election and beyond, and I personally argue that only occurred for political reasons. All of the anti war arguments existed before 2003, and State media did nothing, they went from pro war to anti war in the span of about a year. Funny that. But everybody wore flag pins and pretended to not be afraid, because we really were. Now is very similar, and they will play us again.

        On masks usage in general, the Danish study they attacked and tried to bury pretty much sums it up: statistically insignificant in study but “the 95% CIs are compatible with a 46% reduction to a 23% increase in infection.” So that is the theoretical range with 98% filtering PPE and BEFORE a new variant was released, err detected. Most of what I’ve seen in the US aren’t even N95 level, so their reduction rates are likely zero.

        https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-6817

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          28-Cars-Later,

          “They invaded Iraq purely for oil”

          I believe there was another reason the US invaded Iraq. The Bushes and Hussein were former business partners. One thing I read after 9/11 that made complete sense to me was that wars are always fought for the reasons of the ruling “elite” never for the people. The fact that attack iraq I and attack iraq II were during Bush senior’s and Bush junior’s administrations, respectively, leads me to believe that the Bushes were punishing Hussein for some kind of business falling out. Stealing their oil and establishing military presence on Iran’s border were, no doubt, additional goals.

          The whole situation around 9/11 was strange. We (the peasants) were supposed to believe that the US security apparatus had no idea that it was going to happen, but then shortly thereafter they knew exactly who the perps were and endless details about how it was done. Supposedly the people that flew the planes had trained on small planes and simulators. But, the last turn of the (I think) second plane into the tower was done with incredible skill. And, too precious for words: “I see buildings; I see water” (stewardess). As reported the planes were flown at very low altitudes at speeds grossly in excess of the allowable operational envelope of the planes. Anyone who has ever flown on a commercial plane of that size knows that you can hear very clearly what is going on. At that speed, at that altitude, the planes would have been screaming (I recall some Boeing engineers were surprised the planes held together). So, I think the stewardess would have said something more like WTF is going on???? The whole “official” story read like a B thriller movie.

          I have tried and tried to figure out what is going in re CV19, but the only firm conclusion I’ve come to is that something stinks with the whole media circus.

          I suppose the most obvious symbolism of the masks is to tell us to “shut up.” No freedom of speech allowed.

          I have never heard of any science to back up the six foot “social [sic] distance” rule. I have heard of studies that state that the aerosols can travel up to approx 30′, but nothing about 6′. Just common sense will tell you that 6′ is not enough.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Old W,

            have you seen this?
            https://youtu.be/UcWs4TFSjrY

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Shortly before 9/11, Iraq oil exports ditched the mandatory US dollar exchange and switched to Euros.

            That was the first thing that was fixed over there, put back on the petro dollar.

            The lives lost in 9/11 were for greater good. I guess. Something huge had to spark an invasion.

            Otherwise it would have had a cascading effect in the region, with other OPEC nations ditching the US dollar, followed by various banana republics, warlords, cartels and others.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @Old WRX

          There were likely multiple reasons for invading Iraq but chief among them was control of oil which relates directly to the Petrodollar. I have maintained for some time at the 2001 Cheney energy conference proof of Peak Oil was revealed and they scrambled because the US was not in a position to absorb the ramifications of it at the time. So they invade Iraq to secure supply (and Petrodollar backing) but then the shale revolution caught on, and I think they decided they had more time so they withdrew. The convivence of 9/11 is suspect, but not necessarily related (they could have blown up something else as a false flag for justification too) Iraqi gold, pressure on Iran, looting the Iraqi national museum, weapons testing and so on may have been secondary goals, I don’t know.

          Personally I find it bizarre to spend all of that money and human life to then just give it up. Did the Israelis give up the Golan Heights? Did the Russians give up Kaliningrad aka East Prussia or the southern portion of Sakhalin Island? It was obvious a new Saddam was needed to keep that dysfunctional country intact, just install one and be done with it. “Democracy” ha! Its almost as if they wanted to keep it unstable.

          COVID is clearly cover for something else and is obviously the new boogeyman for this decade and probably beyond. Once it became clear it was not what we feared, I said in April or May next time it will be the “killer” version and State Media will simply say oh it mutated because you proles didn’t follow the 99 diktats and stupid humans will buy it. The Denver airport mural comes to mind here as well, perhaps in 2025 they will make good on the mural’s implications and this as opposed to an alien invasion (which has been speculated) will be the catalyst for world “unity” (ISO 20022 or “Fedcoin” isn’t fully implemented till late 2024).

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            28-Cars-Later,

            “Personally I find it bizarre to spend all of that money and human life to then just give it up.”

            True that. But, it does seem a peculiarly US way of doing things. And, yes a new Saddam was needed; for one thing Iraq would never accept rule by non-muslims.

            “COVID is clearly cover…”

            My fear is they will either ramp up the CV stuff somehow and claim it is necessary to clamp down harder on us — with obvious results. And, of course, they will blame it on noncompliance. But, then, it doesn’t really matter whether the next brouhaha is labeled CV or something else. Now that we have had the events of 2020, it isn’t stopping here.

            Oh, yes, thank you for your info on CV. I certainly won’t just brush that aside as you’ve made is quite obvious that you’ve done your homework. I’m sure you can see why the whole thing has left me totally confused…

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            On Iraq I dunno, maybe there was no exit plan? I can’t imagine this is the case but if one looks at the events it certainly seems this way. Maybe they really thought: “oh we’ll just liberate them, establish permanent bases, and install “democracy” like post WWII”. We has pretty stupid people if that was the case. Again, why not install the new Saddam and leave the permanent military bases? They had to have wanted chaos in the region, how this benefits the US I dunno.

            On other things:

            reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/keqhwv/should_i_just_accept_home_prices_are_never_going/gg5mtzz?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Masks reduce the zone that droplets spread out. Roughly 6 feet is the space required in more confined settings without a mask. A mask tightens up that zone. It reduces the rate of transmission. Simple face masks are all that are worn in hospital operating rooms. There is still a chance of infection in the OR. IIRC 1-3%.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      golden2husky,

      The pandemic (real or not — doesn’t matter in what follows) is being touted as an opportunity to implement…

      From the WEF site on the “Great Reset”:

      “As we enter a unique window of opportunity to shape the recovery, this initiative will offer insights to help inform all those determining the future state of global relations, the direction of national economies, the priorities of societies, the nature of business models and the management of a global commons. Drawing from the vision and vast expertise of the leaders engaged across the Forum’s communities, the Great Reset initiative has a set of dimensions to build a new social contract that honours the dignity of every human being.”

      Don’t miss the rather ominous sounding “priorities of societies.” I don’t know about you, but I don’t have any interest in these people managing my “priorities.”

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        My participation here was really about the pandemic itself. I struggle to understand why so many are in denial about the dangers associated with it. I’d certainly like to think it is not just because of political beliefs, but the split in those who take it seriously and those who don’t does seem to line up fairly well along those lines. I’m in better health than most my age so I’m not likely to be at great risk. Yet many of those who oppose mitigation efforts seem to be more likely to have underlying conditions than not and they are putting their own well-being at risk… for what?

        As for the “Great Reset” I had to look that up. You know the saying that “a good crisis should never go to waste” or something like that. The virus, and a lot of the response to it, certainly laid bare a lot of societal issues from access to health care to air pollution. We all have our personal feelings toward such things and I’ll leave it at that.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          golden2husky,

          My disbelief has nothing to do with politics. The coverage in the MSM has been so erratic, so hysterical, etc. that it makes it sound like a hoax. If they want to be believed, if they need to be believed they need to fix that. The fact that there are medical people who do not believe in the pandemic needs to be reported in the MSM — not with the stupid terms “deniers” and “conspiracy theorist.” Real news reporting is not as neat as, say CNN, makes it seem. CNN, NYT, and many others seem almost to have tried to destroy their credibility. Dr. Faustus (Fauci) was a poor choice for talking to the public. He is insulting to people of intelligence (which does not help) and constantly feeds the hysteria. Hysteria and fear are not the way to fight an epidemic. I have never seen a situation where pumping up fear and panic helped fix things.
          Constant “news” full of contradictions and tabloid mentality level of reporting only makes things worse.

          We’ll all be seeing plenty of the Grate Reset soon enough…

  • avatar

    I am more than senior – I am senior staff and I live and breath everything digital. I don’t even have turntable and even more – my audio system does not have analog source inputs – only digital – USB or HDMA. Talking about smartphones – I used to program them in Java and C/C++. I did even Symbian, driver included – what an atrocity, especially memory management. I am glad it is gone away.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Inside Looking Out,

      I can think of a digital gesture… I think by “digital” they are trying to saying via internet. But, it isn’t too clear. And what in heaven’s name is a “digital adoption”? I’m a little afraid to try to figure that one out. The poor english language is sure looking tattered these days…

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Interesting news…. Nashville explosion, next to ATT building, owned by same capital group as Dominion voting systems…. something brewin’.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          slavuta,

          “Nashville explosion,”

          Not to worry. The FBI is on it and I’m sure will know all about it in no time.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          And AT&T is owned by the same parent company that owns CNN…that should get your tinfoil cap heated to the melting point.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            golden2husky,

            “that should get your tinfoil cap heated to the melting point”

            I prefer lead foil (except in California, of course).

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          AT&T being the primary target may be a red herring. The task is to determine everything on that street within the blast zone. The fact it was done on early Christmas and allegedly someone was shouting a warning suggests no loss of life was intended – unlike every other alphabet agency sponsored attack. It could be as simple as insurance fraud.

          • 0 avatar
            Old_WRX

            28-Cars-Later,

            “insurance fraud…”

            Pretty psycho way to do insurance fraud.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Setting a fire may look suspect. Blowing up a block looks more like terrorism than fraud. Just a guess, no idea what really went on here but its curious the bombers seemed to not want to take any lives. Terrorist bombers usually are looking to do that.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          ” next to ATT building, owned by same capital group as Dominion voting systems”

          No they aren’t. Dominion is owned by Staple Street. AT&T is State Street. State Street is also the 7th largest owner of Toyota.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            One moment

            “Staple Street Capital is a private equity firm founded in 2009 based in New York.The co-founders Stephen D. Owens and Hootan Yaghoobzadeh are veterans of The Carlyle Group and Cerberus Capital Management, also the Board members of Dominion Voting. The official website of Staple Street Capital has deleted the team introduction.”

            I also saw that WIKI pages were “fixed”.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      Inside Looking Out,

      “FBI -the Federal Bureau of Indifference?”

      I certainly wasn’t trying to suggest that the Federal Bureau of Intolerance was about to inform the public on the facts of this incident. Though I do expect for there to be an “official story” relatively soon — this guaranteed by the fact that CNN is admitting that it happened. CNN covering it means it is “real.”

  • avatar
    Old_WRX

    “this hybrid buying method improved their overall shopping experience”

    Exactly what function does the word “experience” serve here? I think that usage started at San Quentin when they asked people getting released, “How was your San Quentin experience?”

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “Experience” used in this context is a corporate buzzword for when they care about how the customer actually feels about doing business.

      For instance, if a dealer nails the purchase paperwork and the sales process, but doesn’t clean the bathrooms, there’s a “customer experience” problem which needs to be fixed.

      That’s what they’re talking about here.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        Luke42,

        I know it’s a corporate buzzword — and painfully trite. My point is take out the word “experience” here and it doesn’t change the meaning at all. The word is nothing but mindlessly added corporate fluff. This disease seems to get worse every year.

        Another commonly abused one is the tired use of “leverage.” It’s just a fancy sounding way of saying “use.”

        Then there are the truly dreadful ones like “repurposed.”

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I still prefer seeing, touching, and analyzing a purchase in person. I rarely buy online with the exception of parts and accessories for my motorcycle. It’s usually cheaper than through the local stealerships.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Tim Healey

    Is this some kind hypocracy?
    Passat – “But it has no panache, no pizzazz, and it feels dull and boring.”
    RAV4 – “may be the best all-around small SUV”

    If there is definition of “no pizzazz” it is RAV4. Moreover, it is loud with transmission that shifts harshly. And slow.

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