By on December 8, 2020

 

Ford 7.3-Liter V8 crate engine

Aptly nicknamed Godzilla, Ford’s massive new 7.3-liter V8 pushrod engine that debuted last year in the 2020 F-250 is now available in crate engine form from Ford Performance Parts.

Originally a mythical Jurassic creature that evolved from a sea reptile into a terrestrial monster, Godzilla was awakened by mankind’s nuclear weapons tests in the inaugural film. Over time, as the franchise evolved, Godzilla and other creatures in the films have become metaphors for social commentary on the real world. Godzilla and his fellow monsters embodied the emotions and social problems of the times.

With 430 horsepower and  475 lb-ft of torque, the 7.3-liter V8 features an overhead valve architecture, cam-in-block design, variable-displacement oil pump, extra-large main bearings, a forged steel crankshaft for durability, and piston-cooling jets to help manage temperatures under heavy load. Godzilla has a displacement of 445 cubic inches or 7.3 liters. It’s more compact as a pushrod engine than an overhead cam modular motor like the Coyote, which should allow it to fit into a wider range of vehicles without having to remove shock towers or alter the front suspension.

Is the 7.3-liter Ford engine a worthy challenger to General Motors’ LS engines, which also utilize a smaller package size and a simpler valvetrain? A lighter engine is cheaper to build and modify, which are the reasons why the LS engine is so popular in so many different types of vehicles, from drift cars to overlanders. What we don’t know yet is how much power can Ford’s new 7.3-liter V8 produce when it’s allowed to run wild.

Godzilla lists at $8,150, and what you get is a dressed long block with 10.5:1 compression, aluminum cylinder heads, a throttle body, exhaust manifolds, ignition coils, and a production flex plate. What you end up installing it in, and the resultant trouble you get into is entirely up to you. As Blue Oyster Cult once wrote, “History shows again and again, how nature points up the folly of man, Godzilla!”

[Images: Ford Performance Parts, Ford]

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54 Comments on “Godzilla, Ford’s 7.3-Liter Monster Motor King?...”


  • avatar
    chomachomachoma

    There already is a Godzilla, Ford. It’s the GTR. Which can get over 600hp from an engine half the size. For a 7.3L engine those are some weak numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      notapreppie

      Forced induction goes a long way but, yah, 59 hp/L is pretty anemic.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Try hooking 10 tons to the back of the GTR and pull it uphill out of Stove Pipe Wells on a 120-in-the-shade afternoon with the sun beating down…….

        Ford is also very much hip to small turbo engines for light duty chores. But this engine was designed to run at a high percent of peak power much more continuously.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Of course there is no difference between a turbocharged engine designed for a sports car and a mechanically simple one designed for a 300,000 mile life pulling 20,000 lb in an HD truck. Both should be held to the same design standard.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      This is the base spec, without any performance mods. Keep in mind that the GTR’s engine is also pretty tame when installed in an Altima.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      There’s a lot more to it than a HP figure. Simply having quite a bit more torque than HP should be your first clue. What you should ask next is how long is the wait and how long does the power stay.

      I’d rather have less that’s flat than more that’s peaky.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      I was thinking the same thing.

      The 3.0TT in my MKZ is rated at 400Hp with less than half the displacement.

      • 0 avatar
        CammerLens

        Do these commenters calling the Godzilla “weak” really not understand the difference between a naturally aspirated heavy-duty truck engine and a forced-induction passenger car engine?

        A Formula One engine’s specific output is in the 500hp/liter range. That makes your GTR’s numbers look pretty “weak.”

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          That’s because they know nothing. Actually they know less than nothing. If they only knew they know nothing, that would be something.

          But they don’t.

          • 0 avatar
            Tele Vision

            400 lb/ft at 2000 RPM is perfect for a truck engine. That’s nearly Diesel-spec. My CTS-V’s similar torque peak is at 4400 RPM and serves to keep the boil on when changing up at high revs. Not needed in an automatic truck that could probably pull my house around. The 7.3 looks to be in it for the long haul ( double-entendre intended ).

  • avatar
    phreshone

    You get an A for the day just for the BOC quote.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Godzilla all the things.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      What would you put it in?

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        A ’77 Continental for starters.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’m not sure it would fit in a Panther chassis, but certainly Continental Mark III, IV, V, and the Town Coupe. Then if possible, any Fox body which could accept it.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          With how cheaply a clean ’70s Mark or Town Coupe can be acquired, the thought has certainly crossed my mind.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Clean at this point is collectable, so I don’t imagine there is such a thing as “cheap”. Seek out an average example with imperfections, collectors will blow their load on the right examples but one with three glaring problems will draw less interest. Town Coupes are rare so you’d be better off to find a 73-76 Mark IV or 77-79 Mark V. Off the cuff there were more Mark Vs built than IVs, personally I’d do a ’72 Mark IV (pre Federal bumpers) but that would be much more expensive.

            “Although only on sale for three model years, with a total of 228,262 examples sold, the Continental Mark V is the best-selling version of the Lincoln Mark Series”.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Continental_Mark_V

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            All depends on your definitions I suppose.

            For a car like this, “clean” wouldn’t to me imply “collector” but “solid driver” without rust or serious wear. That kind of car is $5k or less all day around me.

            There is a rust free green on green velour ’77 Town Coupe listed near me for $3500 supposedly needing nothing but a battery and a new vinyl top. I have absolutely no need for another vehicle but it seems like such a shame to let it go to waste.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I have the old Black Book ratings burned into my neurons which are: extra clean, clean, average, and rough. After a certain period of miles (20K IIRC), the highest a vehicle can be rated is “clean”. So in theory a Conti Mark V in the Ford museum (or private hands) with no miles could be considered extra clean at this point. Generally speaking though, clean is going to be collectable on something that old.

            Town Coupes are worth saving and depending on the state its in, should fetch around what you may pay in the future.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Well it is narrower than a 4.6 or Coyote though longer and taller, at least with the stock intake. The big problem is the oil pan that gives it a 9qt oil capacity. There are already companies that have prototyped Godzilla specific K and transmission crossmembers to fit it in a fox with the stock Super Duty oil pan.

          I do expect we will see an aftermarket company or two make smaller pans and a corresponding pickup tube as well as intakes that aren’t as tall.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I can’t see why it would not fit into a Panther chassis. The Panther chassis is just an evolution of the Ford full sized car line. Galaxie’s, XL’s etc. all fit FE engines and even big block 429’s.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I recall reading the difficulties people had doing 5.4 swaps into Panthers. It is possible with modifications but wasn’t a straight drop in. As Scoutdude points out, this Godzilla is taller and longer than the Mod motor. It very well may fit with modifications as does the 5.4 but I’ll believe it when someone does it or someone of Panther expertise weighs in.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            The big problem is height. The included intake is tall, for good low end torque and the pan is deep to give that 9 qt system capacity.

      • 0 avatar
        monkeydelmagico

        1st gen Miata

  • avatar
    Noble713

    My father is finally getting his ’69 Mustang repaired (front frame straightened). He’s had a 428 big block in the car since the 80s, and had to delete things like the power steering and AC for it to fit. At first I suggested to him to replace the powertrain with a Coyote engine, but now I’m thinking this would be an even cooler upgrade.

    This is roughly the same price as an LS376/480, so it’s a great alternative for the brand-conscious who want to avoid a GM solution. Pushrod V8’s and turbocharged Inline-6’s (as much as I hate BMW parts overall, the B58 engine is awesome) for everyone! If you can’t beat ’em, join em!

    • 0 avatar
      MrVolrath

      He really didn’t delete them as a factory equiped ’69 428 Mach 1 mustang didn’t have that from the factory. No ac, no power steering. Just a big engine under the hood that barely fits between the shock towers as it is.

      My ’69 is competition orange with flat black hood,shaker hood scoop, louvered rear window cover and magnum 500 rims. Stock other then the color an rims.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Install it immediately in the Ecosport.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Will it fit in Nissan GT-R?

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    We need to talk about the ratty welds on that display stand…

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      the ratty welds on that display stand…

      An ape with MIG.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Nothing against reaching for a grinder to clean up a display piece before painting, but step one is to get a sound weld with good penetration.

        Third picture, the weld on the right – see how the weld bead is just sitting up on the surface more like glorified spatter. Turn the heat up and get in there.

        Compare the cut-and-etch sections here (thicker gauge metal, but the principle holds):

        https://youtu.be/jtlOOOTpZYM

  • avatar

    Godzilla because it will devastate Japan.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This engine is designed for durability. Yes you could probably turbo charge it and do things to it to make it a performance engine but performance is not what this engine is about. If you want a solid engine that will go 100s of thousands of miles and is capable of using for heavy towing then this is a good engine. You could put this in an old land yacht or a full size truck especially if those vehicles had good bodies and were keepers. This type of engine made the large V8 powered land yachts of the past run literally forever with proper maintenance especially with the low rpms and the smoothness that made long interstate drives effortless. My mother’s 72 Cadillac Sedan Deville had a large 472 cubic inch V8 with a 4 barrel carburetor that drank gas but was as smooth as silk and that literally would last forever which was true of the Lincolns of the same era with their big Ford V8s. This engine is like having those engines but with the benefit of fuel injection and more modern technology.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Two questions:

    1. Why does it have two alternators? Double your pleasure, double your fun, I guess.

    2. Where did they bury the waterpump on this one?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Yeah I’m not sure why they used that picture instead of the official crate engine photos since the front end accessories aren’t included with it.

      The dual alternators are included with the snow plow prep package for a total of 397 amps. Not so much that they really need the 397 amps but that the dual alternators can put out a lot more at idle/low rpm. Also often used on Ambulances, again more for the output at idle and low speed. Also useful in service applications to power an inverter. Super Dutys have a PTO input function, so you connect your switch and a resistor that corresponds to your desired idle speed. Set the parking brake, flip the switch, plug in your tools and work. You need to leave the truck running to power the lights and radio anyway. No screwing around with a generator.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      Having been burned by a a “buried in the block” design of the 3.5L Cyclone water pump, I want to know the answer to #2 for just about any new vehicle I buy.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “A lighter engine is cheaper to build and modify”

    Not really.

    A “simpler” design will be cheaper to build and/or modify depending on design/mods. Most of these modern engines can be tuned rather easily to put out much more HP than stock without touching the internals.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Didn’t realize this engine has a buried water pump. If water pump fails does that mean coolant gets in the engine? If that is the case then I would not touch this engine nor any engine with a buried water pump. Other than the water pump this would be a solid engine.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The water pump on the 7.3L is not internal. You can see the part in the lead picture of this article.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Didn’t you know, just because a small portion of the 3.5/3.7 had a water pump inside the timing cover now all Fords have water pumps inside the timing cover? Never mind the fact that this is a pushrod engine with no room between the cam and crank for a water pump to go.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Thanks I can see it now. I would not buy any vehicle with an engine with an internal water pump.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    So I’m guessing they reengineered the oil pickup and the pan design? When the 7.3 came out it was said that the engine wouldn’t be suited for passenger cars because the oil pan was too deep, so couldn’t sit low in a chassis. They also made it sound like it wasn’t something that could be easily overcome.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I’m not sure what this engine will fit into. I’ve tried to find specs and the most interesting point I found was this,

      “It was engineered to directly replace the aging Modular-based 6.8 liter V-10”.

      Perhaps the crate offering is more for HD vehicles?

      This is from Ford Performance:

      “Bellhousing bolt pattern same as 4.6/5.4 and 5.0 Coyote
      Engine weight: 580 lbs.”

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “A few weeks ago, Evan and Wolfe proved the 7.3-liter can be shoehorned into a Fox-Body Mustang without issue. What’s more, in another breakdown, they show that it’s a whole 4.5-inches narrower than a Coyote. This means the pushrod lump not only has the benefit of modern engine construction, but it’s also compact enough to stick in project cars and trucks of all sorts.”

    https://www.thedrive.com/news/32064/fords-new-7-3-l-gas-v-8-can-be-tuned-to-600hp-and-fit-in-a-fox-body-mustang

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