By on August 13, 2020

The Rare Rides series has previously featured many Pontiacs, and today’s hatchback is our ninth to wear the Red Arrow badge. It’s also the smallest Pontiac we’ve ever featured.

It’s not a Chevette, but it is the Chevette’s sporty Driving Excitement cousin!

By the mid-Seventies, it was time for General Motors to shake up its smallest H-body entry-level cars, the subcompact Chevrolet Vega and Pontiac Astre. Vega first went on sale in 1971, with the Astre following for 1973. Both Vega and Astre continued through the 1977 model year, though their replacement in the T-body based Chevette bowed in 1976.

Worth a mention, GM had other subcompact offerings that utilized the rear-drive H-body. Four of them, to be exact: Chevrolet Monza, Pontiac Sunbird, Buick Skyhawk, and the Oldsmobile Starfire. But those four designs were newer than Vega or Astre, and lived on through the 1980 model year before their consolidation and replacement by front-drive J-body options.

The new T-body was a new type of platform for GM. Designed as a base for subcompact cars globally, the T was spread to many brands, and produced in seven different factories. Versions of the T-body were used abroad on the Isuzu Gemini, Daewoo Maepsy, Vauxhall Chevette, and Opel Kadett. Other mixed badge reworks included brands like Holden, Bedford, Grumett, and GMC. A slightly successful world car, General Motors shifted over 7 million T-based vehicles.

A direct result of the oil crisis of 1973, development of the Chevette began that same year. Efficiency, smaller vehicles, and foreign competition meant GM needed something all-new. Launched in fall 1975 as a ’76 model, Chevette was immediately successful. It had a few years on its own in the US, as the Pontiac T1000 did not debut until 1981. Canadians, however, immediately received both the Chevette and a Pontiac version called Acadian.

Initially the Chevette was available only in three-door guise. The three-door rode on a 95.3-inch wheelbase, and was on its own until the five-door debuted in 1978. The two additional doors brought two more inches of wheelbase to Chevette. The larger version proved instantly more popular, and accounted for over half of model sales in 1978.

Available power started with either a 1.4- or 1.6-liter inline-fours, which produced between 53 and 60 horsepower. By 1978, the 1.4 was dropped, with a high-output version of the 1.6 added for more power. 1981 brought the additional availability of an unpopular 1.8-liter Isuzu diesel engine, which was only available with a five-speed manual. Other transmissions included a four-speed manual (pre-81), and three-speed automatic.

There was a slight visual refresh for 1978 that reworked the front clip, as well as a more substantial visual rework in 1983. Changes for ’83 brought Chevette’s appearance in line with what most people picture when they read the word Chevette.

After the introduction of the Pontiac T1000 in 1981, minor trim updates and modernization changes occurred alongside the Chevette. Mostly, the changes were visual tweaks to refresh an aging economy car, but trims were gradually deleted during the last few years of Chevette production. The T1000 became 1000 for 1984 onward. One of the last updates for either model was the addition of a CHMSL in 1986.

Chevette and 1000 production ended in December 1986, allowing for a 1987 model year of the waning subcompact. The American replacement for the Chevette was the quota-restricted Chevrolet Spectrum for roughly two years. It was quickly rebranded as the Geo Spectrum and supplemented by the new Metro in 1989.

Today’s Rare Ride is in near-perfect condition, minus one rear fender dent. For sale in the rust-free locale of Houston, it asks $4,900.

[Images: seller]

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62 Comments on “Rare Rides: A 1986 Pontiac 1000 – Preserved Performance...”


  • avatar
    JimC2

    I’m impressed—very, very impressed—that someone would be so dedicated to keep such an ordinary car like this alive for forty years. Just all the effort for details like the fungible rubber parts on the engine and drivetrain is amazing to me, that the interior isn’t dry rotted, I could go on and on. I get a real kick out of spotting moderately well preserved, everyday cars but this one really takes that to a new level.

    Kudos!

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      I agree. This should be placed in a museum. To show future generations the type of vehicle that were common in their era. Instead we generally preserve the ones that we might see a couple of times a year on the road.

      Preserving the exotics creates a false impression of what driving was actually like for the majority of the population.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        This kind of thing wasn’t really the “common car” for the majority of 1986 either.

        thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/09/best-selling-cars-
        around-the-globe-america-loves-a-celebrity/

        A truck or an A-body would be more appropriate.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Not to disparage the A bodies, as the Celebrity sold just over 2 million during its production run. Add in the 6000, Century and Cutlass Ciera and they were certainly sales ‘winners’ for GM. As you posted the Celebrity in 1986 was the top selling car in the USA.

          However worldwide the T-Platform sold over 7 million. Which would mean more than the A body.

          The Chevette averaged sales of just over 230,000 annually over 12 years, outselling the Celebrity head to head over their lifetimes.

          From Wikipedia:
          ‘The Chevette ultimately reached 2,793,353 sales for its entire production across the 12 model years 1976-1988.’ Global T-car sales surpassed 7 million in the end.’

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “The Chevette averaged sales of just over 230,000 annually over 12 years, outselling the Celebrity head to head over their lifetimes.”

            From what I’m seeing here the Celebrity had average annual sales of 265K during its lifetime, which would be more than the Chevette number you cited.

            wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Celebrity#Production

            We’re also talking MY86 here and by then the T-platform was at the twilight of its life (in North America anyway) and not a part of the top seller list. It isn’t indicative of a late 1980s vehicle. A mid-size sedan would be much more appropriate.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @ajla: i) Did the Chevette outsell the Celebrity overall? Yes. ii) Did the T Platform outsell the A overall? Yes. iii) Therefore were Chevettes more common than Celebrities? Yes (by definition). iv) Were we talking about a museum display or sales for just one year? No. My initial point was referencing vehicles that represent their respective eras.

            So based on those statistics the Chevette is more representative of its era overall than the Celebrity.

            Finally this is an article about a rare survivor car. One that deserves preservation as a representation of what millions of Americans chose or were forced to drive/ride in.

            It also serves to demonstrate why Japanese small cars began to dominate the market, replacing domestic vehicles. Therefore it does have some ‘historical’ importance.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “So based on those statistics the Chevette is more representative of its era overall than the Celebrity.”

            What “era” was the Chevette a part of? What “era” was the Celebrity a part of?

            To use a more recent example, would you consider a 2020 Fusion or a 2020 Jeep Compass more representative of the current era? The Ford has far more lifetime sales and even (barely) more current recent year sales. Yet, I doubt you would choose a mid-size sedan over a CUV.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            If the Fusion is the last sedan sold by Ford in North America then it would have far more historical significance than a Jeep Compass.

            Now compare the Chevette to the competition offered by Honda, Toyota, Datsun/Nissan, Mazda and Mitsubishi. It represents a sea change in the perception of consumers.

            There are other SUVs/CUVs that are more important culturally than the Compass.

    • 0 avatar
      namesakeone

      Actually, since you’re talking about museum exhibits, I don’t know of any stock Celebrities (or Cieras or 6000s or A-body Centuries) in museums, but the very first production Chevette is in the Sloan Museum in Flint, Michigan.

      I wonder how difficult it would be to source the trim molding on the driver-side doors.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Great find, Corey!

    That is astonishingly clean. These had front ball joint/bushing issues which gave them a negative camber stance before failure, and this example may have that going on.

    “1981 brought the additional availability of an unpopular 1.8-liter Isuzu diesel engine, which was only available with a five-speed manual.”

    Maybe for the Pontiac version, but my parents were given an 82 Chevette diesel which had the 3-speed automatic. It was the slowest car available in the 1982 model year, and it had a 75 mph top speed. Throttle was either off or full on. But it got 40 mpg year round, no matter how it was thrashed.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      I bet those aren’t the original ball joints (or maybe the car comes with a small spare parts collection including fresh new ones).

      The gasoline Chevettes were geared to be surprisingly, uh, spritely off the line. Of course they ran out of steam after about a hundred feet, but for that key, vaguely-defined performance metric of blending in with other traffic when the light turns green or when you turn out of the grocery store parking lot, they were quite okay.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Yup you can thank the Canadians for the T1000 and Astre. In Canada it was CPC or Chevrolet-Pontiac-Canada. Up there Pontiac was sold as a low priced brand, like Chevrolet and a given area might have a Chev-Olds dealer or a Pontiac-Buick dealer but not both. So Pontiac needed an analog to an entry level Chevy.

    US Pontiac dealers of course got wind of those Canadian price leaders and had to have their own.

    The Mercury Bobcat was also thanks to Canada when the Mercury dealers who had enough problems north of the boarder with the discontinuation of the Meteor brand wanted an entry level/subcompact car. So the Bobcat was born and shortly there after it started showing up in US showrooms too.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      For about 20 years Canadian Pontiacs were Pontiac bodies, bright work and instrument panels placed on Chev chassis, with Chev engines.

      You had Chev-Olds-Cadillac dealers. And Pontiac-Buick-GMC dealers. In the 1960’s Pontiac-Buick also had the Acadian brand. Pontiacs

      No cross overs. And quite often in Toronto or other big cities you would see these 2 different types of dealers on the same street. For instance Eglinton Avenue East in Scarboro (the most eastern part of Toronto). However in the smaller communities there was usually only one dealer aligned with a manufacturer, hence the need for multiple lines. Pontiac was in Canada much more popular, percentage wise in sales, than in the USA during this period.

      Ford was usually a stand alone. Although they had the Monarch line for just over a decade. Then there were Mercury-Lincoln dealers who on and off for about 3 decades also had the Meteor which was a Ford with Mercury bright work. It was however sometimes possible to order a Lincoln from a Ford dealer.

      Chrysler was a little more complicated. If I remember correctly it could have been Plymouth-Chrysler with Dodge as a stand alone?

      Of course things really began to blur in the 1980s’ with brands like Asuna, Geo, Saturn, etc. But then in the 1950’s and early 1960’s it was much more common to see vehicles from UK manufacturers in Canada than in the USA. For example Rootes Motors had an assembly facility in Canada. Also on Eglinton Avenue East (The Golden Mile). That building still exists.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Give me an Astre ;-) instead.

    A group of nuns here in Gallup still had a two door wagon Astre running strong in 2002 when I arrived in town. I assumed it had been donated by some good Catholics estate.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    “Changes for ’83 brought Chevette’s appearance in line with what most people picture when they read the word Chevette.”

    What, rusted doors, a tailgate that didn’t close all of the way, a dangling muffler with smoke pouring out from under the car, and at least three warning lamps lit up at all time? A lot of love, hard work, and money went into the car shown here, but for most buyers, it was use ’em and toss ’em. And cars like this were a key reason why and how the Japanese came in with their small cars and ate Detroit’s lunch.

    • 0 avatar
      Yankee

      Hit the nail right on the head theflyersfan. I too appreciate the effort that kept this car on the road all these years, and the comments of those who say it embodies many memories of domestic offerings during the period. But it is precisely the poor build quality, so-so fuel economy, and non-existent performance of these cars that made offerings from Japan so revolutionary. My dad always owned average poor quality domestic company cars (think Skylark, Omega, Grand Prix, Diplomat, Taurus, etc.), and after suffering with a Dodge Omni 024 as my mom’s car for a couple years, they went out and bought a brand new 1987 Honda Accord 3-door hatchback (the one with the pop-up lights). With my newly minted driver’s license, I remember being astounded by the quality of everything from the switchgear to the quietness, fit and finish, and even upholstery. It was unlike anything I’d ever seen growing up with a new domestic company car in the household every two years. I went foreign immediately and never looked back. Now as a 50-year-old mechanic, I’m still amazed at the poor build quality of domestic offerings. I work on them all, and they’re still garbage after all these years. From GM models that depreciate to nothing long before the loan has been paid, to Fords that come apart in spectacular ways, to Chrysler products (so-called “Jeeps” included) that make me amazed that we bailed this pitiful company out twice in my lifetime instead of letting it die as it so richly deserved. This Pontiac ought to be in a Museum as Arthur Dailey suggested – as an example of why the American auto industry failed so spectacularly so many times.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        The velour upholstery in Accords of that generation were exceptionally good. Our ’86 Accord sedan is still the one car that my wife misses. It was her favourite.

        Driving a client and his wife home one evening in the Accord, his wife spent most of the ride comparing the Accord to their D3 sedan. Two weeks later he had Honda.

        Anyone who bought a Chevette as a personal vehicle rather than their Japanese competition probably made a serious error. That vehicle helped to end ‘brand loyalty’ for GM, and to destroy Sloan’s strategy of having consumers start at the bottom and move up the GM ladder with succeeding purchases.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        My parents were the exact same way. My dad puttered around in some really bad 70s and 80s-era American cars until his last one had the engine totally fail on him soon after he got it. He bought a Nissan, and was eventually forced into American cars due to company car policy, went right back to foreign makes when that policy ended. My mom was the same way – her 1990 Maxima was her first foreign car and she’s never looked back.

        There is no gentle way to put it…the American cars of that era where flat out junk. Cheap feeling, unrefined engines in a lot of mass market cars, shoddy quality…sitting my my aunt’s mid-80s Civic was a revelation on how much better the Japanese cars were at that time. Soon after that, other family members purchased Japanese cars through the rest of the 80s and 90s and also never looked back. The American car makers weren’t even on the radar. We were burned by terrible cars too many times.

        That’s continued to this very day where everyone in the immediate and almost everyone in the extended family drives a Japanese-brand or European-branded car or truck. It’s because of heaps dumped on GM, Ford, and Chrysler lots during this time. Compare an 86 Civic to this Pontiac or a Sundance…no comparison at all. And more people were willing to pay the difference.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “It’s not a Chevette, but it is the Chevette’s sporty Driving Excitement cousin!”

    It IS a Chevette, with snappy decals :(

    I am amazed that there is still one running in such good shape. Why there is, is anyone’s guess.

    Good find, Corey :)

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Waaaay back in the mists of time I was a poor college student driving my dad’s hand-me-down car, a 1987 Nissan Stanza with plenty of highway miles.

    I got out of class and was driving down a back road when a gold Pontiac T1000 pulled up next to me at a red light. The driver begins revving his engine and edging forward as if wanting to race.

    Back then my roommate has a Chevette so I was looking at this guy wondering what planet he was from.

    That mighty Nissan 102 hp pulled away like he was standing still ;)

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      Dividebytube – how many miles did you get out of your 87 Stanza? All five members of my immediate family (including three of us who took it to college) drove our 87 Stanza 5-speed and I want to say it racked up over 250,000 miles with the original engine and transmission (had some rust on the doors, but that’s it) and then someone ran a red and t-boned it. Game over…sigh.

      DON’T MESS WITH THE STANZA!!! ;-)

  • avatar
    canam23

    A terrible car preserved is still… a terrible car.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      No doubt. But $4900 for nostalgia is pretty cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        How many people feel nostalgic for what amounts to an American Trabant?

        Does anyone remember when the back seat of a Chevette was optional?

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Called a ‘Scooter’. But none were in stock at any dealers. And if you tried to order one you were quickly ‘upsold’.

          Yes these were awful cars. And their engineering and technology as well as build quality were inferior to that of concurrent Japanese offerings.

          However they ran and ran and ran. They ran terribly, but they ran. Perhaps the ultimate cockroach car.

          Is it my imagination or is the carpeting on this cockroach deeper and plusher than on many current vehicles?

        • 0 avatar
          Opus

          I think the “back seat optional” was only on the Chevette Scooter, the ultra-economy (cheap) model.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            In my college days I knew a girl with a Chevette Scooter – but her’s had the back seat.

            I helped her a few times with silly things like wipers that refused to turn off but I could never convince her to let me do more than tinker under the hood.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            This gets me thinking- I wonder how many people picked the Scooter model, deleted the seat, brought it home and promptly (and proudly) acquired and installed a junkyard seat themselves. Back then you could probably pick-and-pull one for about $20. I wonder what the delete option saved you on the order sheet too.

            Cars like the Scooter (and Yugo, and Ladas sold in the free world, and…) are evidence of the lengths some people will got to avoid buying a *used* car. Whatever makes a person happy, I guess.

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          I used to work at a place that had a fleet of 25-year old Chevettes as delivery cars. They’re absolutely terrible, but as battered, worthless, and most importantly, light and RWD cars, they were kind of fun to Chuck about, especially in the snow. I’m nostalgic for them, although definitely not $4900 nostalgic.

  • avatar

    In 1982 motor week stated the Pontaic 100 was the slowest accelerating car they ever tested. Even by the standards of the day the Pontaic’s acceleration was slow. Motor week recorded a 0-60 mph time of 30 seconds for this vehicle. After the road test the opinion of the testers turned decidely sarcastic.
    The infamous review is below.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oMsXLYFU0pU

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      The “Pontaic 100” was slow, you needed to go with the Pontiac 1000 to go fast ;-)

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Motor week recorded a 0-60 mph time of 30 seconds for this vehicle.”

      Wow, that’s even worse than a Crosstrek.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Thirty seconds to 60? Ouch…no wonder so few of these survived. The people unfortunate enough to own them probably just torched the things after a while in frustration.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      When the 0-60 time gets much over about 20 seconds then it might as well be “indefinite” because what’s really going on is the car’s top speed is only marginally higher than 60, which also means that the car’s top speed on any given day is very sensitive to a lot of little things- slight grades, rough surface instead of fresh, smooth blacktop, the wind, other environmental differences like a hot day, driving in the rain, mild elevation instead of being at sea level… maybe one or two tires a bit underinflated.

      Fun stuff. Okay, not really. Driving cars like that is miserable.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @JimC2: well, that’s the it went during the Malaise Era.

        I think I actually test drove a slower car – a ’80 Rabbit Diesel, which my dad (bargain hunter that he was, God love him) had eyed as a high school graduation car for me. It was over a year old, but brand-new and never titled, so the dealer was willing to basically give the thing away.

        How did it go unsold that long, you ask?

        1) It was pea soup green.
        2) Diesel
        3) No A/C or radio
        4) Dark brown vinyl seats.

        And, oh yeah…we were in St. Louis, where you’d routinely just melt during the months of June through August. To sum up…a barf-colored green diesel Rabbit with vinyl seats, no air and no radio…in St. Louis…in July.

        Yes, I looked this gift horse in the mouth (I ended up kicking in a grand or so of my saved-up fast-food wages, and got a much nicer ’81 Rabbit which had air and a stereo, thank God).

        • 0 avatar
          theflyersfan

          Would we currently find the remains of this treasure somewhere at the bottom of the Mississippi River? It’s probably still leaving trails of diesel soot behind!

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Oh my gosh, the nostalgia on that Motorweek bit:

      “West Germany”

      “The Fifth Republic”

      Would the kids playing with tiktok these days even understand what those words mean?

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      Best part of that entire review is when they are loading the luggage into the cargo bay. By the end, it’s just getting tossed in like “Let’s just get this over with…”

      When John Davis runs out of nice things to say about a car, you know it’s a dud! That guy can find a silver lining in a nuclear mushroom cloud!

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        His comment about the little cubbies in the Nissan being just the right size for “a pack of smokes” had me rolling. The brake test on the same car gave me just as good a laugh.

        Cars with a severe rear brake bias were more common than a lot of people remember (some with a severe front bias too). Sometimes the engineers were indifferent about getting it right and sometimes the bean counters didn’t give them a big enough budget to get it right. It was a challenge getting front disc + rear drum to be even across all different kinds of road friction (affects the f-r load transfer under max braking), are we stopping on a steep downhill or an uphill? (again, load transfer), loading heavy stuff in the trunk and back seat or loading nothing… ABS can mask a lot of mechanical shortcomings.

        Kids will never know the joy of slamming on the brakes for the fun of the loud skidding tire noise, while your high school friends in the car produce their best impression of terrified, blood-curdling screams, as a prank to wake up the poor guy in the car who made the mistake of falling asleep.

        Kids will never know the joy of slamming on the brakes and having the back end come around like that- and bunnies will no longer experience the brief exhilaration of successfully avoiding the front wheels of a car, panic stopping like that and just barely out of control, only to get wiped all over the road by one of the rear wheels coming at them sideways a split second later.

  • avatar

    I once drove a Pontiac 6000 with an iron duke engine. That car could get to 60 mph in about 15 seconds. Imagine a car being twice as slow to 60 mph.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      There are always the people who putter to 60 in their high-zoot Toyotas who would never notice.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        “There are always the people who putter to 60 in their high-zoot Toyotas who would never notice.”

        Speaking as an owner of two Toyotas who does not putter and who knows how to think and look ahead at the road and merge properly into fast-moving traffic, this statement annoys me- because it is true! You are *absolutely* right!

        I thought the same thing as I read each of the comments about slow acceleration and other low performance stats on this article. I thought, “that thing would blend right in with a lot of brown Camrys…”

  • avatar

    If it was the Pontaic 10,000 it would still be slow. I believe it is still the slowest accelerating car motor week ever tested.

  • avatar

    When measuring the Pontiac 1000’s speed you would be wise to swap your stop watch for a calendar.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It still should be crushed, like any other cockroach.

    Yeah, yeah, “time capsule”, so what? A lot of great things happened in ’86, this ain’t one of them.

    I’m good for $5, who’s with me?

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    My dad had an 81 Chevette with the 1.8-liter Isuzu diesel engine and a five-speed manual.
    Yes it could be pokey slow up hills but on the highway and around town it was an ok commuter car that got over 52 mpg which was the EPA mileage leader at the time, comparable to the Rabbit Diesel.
    The body held up well however these had issues with the front shock towers rotting. Even the good folks at J.C Whitney sold a repair kit for them.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Owning this is like saying you have a pair of jail shower shoes from 1978 in mint condition.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Hey look, kids – this is what a vehicle with a curb weight of 2,100 pounds looks like.

    Based on my very limited experience (as a passenger NOT the driver) this vehicle could have benefited from the torque of an EV powertrain.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Was the 1000 ever fitted with the diesel powertrain that was available in the Chevette?

  • avatar
    ehaase

    Chevette did not replace Vega. Chevette debuted for 1976 model year. Vega lasted through 1977 model year. Some Vega body styles were consolidated in Monza lineup for 1978 model year.

    There were proposals to make the 2.8L V6 optional in the Chevette but unfortunately that never happened.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    The only good thing about this car is the Isuzu Impulse and maybe whatever suspension bits it donated to the Fiero, and that even is a stretch.

    Several of these in my high school parking lot…usually with “Fugazi”, “Tad”, “Ned’s Atomic Dustbin” or some other angsty early 90s band stickers covering the rear window.

    They made my 4 cylinder, 5 speed Ranger feel like a rocket.

  • avatar
    B-BodyBuick84

    The one decent thing about these little sh!tboxes is that they’re RWD and 3.8 litre V6 of the era (no 3800 series 2 unfortunately) will drop right in. Rumor has it that the 3.8 was supposed to be a factory option, but they didn’t because of the mileage hit. Apparently GM thought that gas was going to be something like $3.00 gallon by 85′ and didn’t see the need. By the time they got over their shock that gas was still around a $1.50 by the mid 80’s, it wasn’t worth offering the 3.8 in a platform that was going to be discontinued in a year or two.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      The Chevy 2.8L V6 was considered, and at least one prototype built, but I’m unaware of the Buick 3.8 being considered. Didn’t know the Series 2 3800 was bigger.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I remember these :

    Very popular as fleet cars, the City of Los Angeles decided to take parking enforcement away from the L.A.P.D. and created an all new parking enforcement division that made a _LOT_ of money .

    Each T100 had a roof mounted remote control spotlight to better check the tag numbers and evidence of current registration .

    At that time the down town convention center was surrounded by tiny little third world apartments, they’d park all over any which – way and the local citizens got pissed off when they got ticketed so quite a few of these were burned curbside or had their windows smashed out .

    The DWP and other departments had them too .

    Cheap and cheerful they sold as salvage for under $500 in good running condition with cold AC .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I am glad I didn’t have one of these I was still driving my 77 Monte Carlo thru the 80s. I do agree with Arthur that this should be a museum piece because of its survivor status and so many of these were sold especially in the Chevette form. I rode in a few of these which were not only slow but rattled and shook.

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