By on May 8, 2020

Earlier this week, we reported on a bizarre story in which a 5-year-old Utah boy stole his parents’ Dodge Journey to drive to California. His mission? To procure a Lamborghini for himself. As you already know, he was picked up by local authorities before making much headway, but he wound up getting closer to his dream than anyone imagined.

Adrian Zamarripa’s junior adventure earned quite a bit of media coverage, encouraging a nearby Lambo enthusiast to visit the family this week and give the child some quality time inside his black Huracan. The car’s owner, Jeremy Neves, said he was impressed with the child’s initiative and wanted to meet him. 

“I don’t want to condone kids taking cars and getting in trouble or breaking the law but the success principles that he displayed were magnificent to me,” Neves told local outlet Fox 13 News.

A little research shows Mr. Neves as the president of a marketing firm and, as a Lamborghini owner, terms like “success principles” are to be expected. He wasn’t the only party that appreciated Adrian’s moxie, either. The outlet also reports that a company in California has offered to fly the child out to California so he can actually drive a Lamborghini — under adult supervision.

While this probably undermines any punishment he was supposed to receive for stealing the family automobile, showing that you can have something if you’re willing to go out on a limb and get it could be a good lesson. However, this isn’t a parenting website and your author has never boosted a car for personal gain, so we’ll hold off on issuing any opinions about child-rearing. We’re mainly impressed that a 5-year-old actually managed to drive on the expressway without hurting anyone ⁠— ultimately achieving the most-realistic version of his selfish goal.

Utah Highway Patrol also confirmed that no charges will be filed as a result of Adrian’s actions.

“It’s like [Adrian] planned everything, which is crazy,” his sister Sydney told the media.

The impetus for the event was a reportedly heated argument with his mother about getting him a vehicle. The boy reportedly spends hours watching Lamborghini videos online and has repeatedly asked for one. Unable to comprehend why that wasn’t possible, he attempted to take matters into his own hands by stealing the Dodge Journey while his mother was at work. State Troopers found him cruising below the speed limit on I-15, where he explained that he was driving to California to purchase an Italian supercar. His family confirmed that it wasn’t the first time he had expressed the plan.

“I’m happy he got to experience this,” his sister said. “Despite everything that is happening, he got it.”

 

[Image: Fox 13 News Utah/Youtube]

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38 Comments on “Young Car Thief Acheives Dream After All...”


  • avatar
    redapple

    BARF

    Should face discipline.
    NOT
    Rewards.

  • avatar
    retrocrank

    Kid needs a reality check. From the looks of it, by the time he’s old enough to drive he won’t fit in anything other than a Peterbuilt.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I wonder what he gets the next time he steals a car?

    Oh wait, 5-10 years. Surprise!

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    While it was nice of the guy to give the kid a memory of a lifetime, we are in the midst of a pandemic and not a scrap of concern about the health of the kid, or the owner of the car seem to have entered their minds.

    Being dismissive of science, and proper parenting aside, car enthusiasts are doing the entire car business, and the collector car business, a great favor by doing things like this. I often see mostly older people at car shows with plenty of “don’t touch” signs on the cars. I totally get owners not wanting people to touch their $25K paint work but the hobby will die off if young blood is not brought in to the fold. I came out of the supermarket once to see a guy with his kid – maybe 8 years old – looking at my C7 with the top down. I asked the guy if he would like to take a photo with his kid sitting behind the wheel. The guy looked surprised at the offer but the kid lit up like it was Christmas morning. So, he sat his kid inside, I closed the door, and he snapped a few photos. I hope I helped make an enthusiast that day.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Yeah it was a nice gesture but just a little weird with all the hugs. As for breaking the law: the kid is only 5 so I would cut him a break. I just wonder how he planned on paying for car once he arrived at the dealer – Monopoly money?

      Last Halloween I had some kids at the door ask if they could take a picture next to my C7. No problem, glad to see they were interested as most kids only care about video games.

      As for owners – I found there is a big difference between car shows and track days. Show cars are roped off with do not touch signs, but at the track almost everyone has the opposite attitude… they are more then happy to let you sit in their super car. This fact is pretty much the only reason my wife joins me for one or two track days a year. She loves checking out these machines in person.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        I have let plenty of kids sit in my Viper at car shows as long as they are respectful.

        I would have killed for a chance like that when I was young, and it’s the least I can do to help make some other little kid’s day.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      The driving part was breaking the law- but taking the car would not have been considered “theft” unless the parents were willing to press charges.

      The kid was young enough that no one probably thought to tell him not to drive yet, just like they probably hadn’t yet taught him about safe sex…

      Glad it turned out ok for everyone involved

  • avatar
    Jon

    The kids father is never mentioned. Assuming Adrian doesn’t have a father figure and that Jeremy gave the kid a solid stern talking to before and after the ride, good for Jeremy for stepping in as a solid male role model.

  • avatar

    Future Criminal Rewarded for Behavior, Bad Parent Enjoys Media Attention While Ignoring Quarantine

    Film at 11.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    The the quarantine is bulsht. Read and learn. Do not ignore science, and don’t blame people with common sense and a need to work for ignoring it either.

    Educate yourself. The data is in.

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/11568244/uk-coronavirus-lockdown-futile-hasnt-saved-lives/

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      The primary goal of the lockdown was to take the load off of the hospital system to prevent people from dying in the hallways of overloaded hospitals. To that end the lockdown was a success. You yourself have posted about hospitals not having bed and ventilator shortages. That is due to the efficacy of the social distancing push. Ultimately without a vaccine the spread will continue as the world begins to reopen.

      “Do not ignore science”…Oh the irony from a supporter of an administration that has ignored science repeatedly for the gain of his political supporters. And to think the words from Flynn “I am guilty” apparently don’t mean what they say. We may not get a vaccine from Covid-19, but there is a vaccine for Covid-45. It’s called Election Day.

    • 0 avatar
      retrocrank

      Area under the curve of the prevalence of infected people doesn’t change (until a vax or curative anti-viral is available). Quarantine if done well squashes the curve (e.g. Australia or NZ), and keeps the peak from rising above a level that overwhelms both available resources and the societal ability to deal with death. It’s a trade off, the price being a toll on economics of consumption.

      Of course there is the unstated fact that an awful lot of what we do as humans is to protect the masses from evolutionary pressures. Fat children driving cars and mistaking tabloid for science are variations on the same theme.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      You of all [email protected] people haven’t earned the right to tell people to “not ignore science.” Science is repeatable, peer-reviewed studies, not a handful of fringe beliefs. Your constant downplaying of the conclusions of most actual scientists (while dodging any questions as to your qualifications to do so) is the epitome of ignoring science, you colossal hypocrite.

      • 0 avatar
        retrocrank

        Maymar – sure hope you were aiming at thelaine with that…

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          You’re damn right I was, thelaine apparently knows better than every actual scientific until it’s convenient.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            thelaine is a tinfoil hat nutjob. I’m doing my best to ignore him. If you engage him you end up down a rabbit hole to which there is no return… Just sayin’

          • 0 avatar
            Nick_515

            Maymar, what Lie2me said. One direct consequence of talent exit from TTAC – both staff and commentators – has been the rise in people with fringe ideas. Whoever is sticking around has to walk that fine line between letting fringe beliefs unchallenged – and fester – and being able to still stick around. That’s the name of the game.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Nick, TTAC has always had it’s share of nutjobs, remember BAFO and his chicken tax?

          • 0 avatar

            “BAFO and his chicken tax?”

            What, he was a chicken farmer?

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      thelame: As long as you’re not staying in, we’d like you to go drive to the edge of the flat Earth. Call us when you get there.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      thelaine, cut the crap. This is a car site, so knock off the crank opinions, or head on over to any rage filled political site to express your obtuse observations there.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I think I’ll just keep cutting and pasting this rebuttal with each of his posts:

      “I just finished a course titled “Medical Literacy”. That is defines as “Skills to enable access, understanding and use of information for health.” It was about dealing with individuals that are clueless about health care. 22% have a basic understanding, 14% below basic, 60% are illiterate.
      The key to literacy is providing a simple, clear, basic and consistent repeat of the message. This course was NOT about COVID-19 but is relevant.

      In the USA we see partisan politics muddling the message and we see King Covid deliver a massive amount of disinformation i.e. chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, injecting disinfectants, UV light, it will be soon down to zero, it’s a flu… ad nauseam.
      The medically illiterate lap it up because for most people, they would rather hear what they want to hear as opposed to hearing the truth.

      With that being said, Sweden is in itself is an outlier with very high death rates. The UK has a higher population density. Since testing with COVID-19 screens or antibody testing is woefully inadequate, it is difficult to protect the old and vulnerable since one does not know who is infectious.

      As previously pointed out, a huge swath of the USA population is unhealthy due to obesity (40%) and preexisting conditions (40%). 25% of young adults (under 60) end up hospitalized due to COVID-19.

      Data mining to meet one’s illiterate view doesn’t change the facts.”

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    I don’t think this story is about the boy or his family. It’s about the slick owner who managed to plant a story about himself. Notice his profession.

    Barf.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    Endangering lives to get a shiny bauble. This is what you call “success principles”? What a gross story.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    ” you can have something if you’re willing to go out on a limb and get it could be a good lesson”

    What?

    Yes, being a car thief IS going out on a limb that usually breaks

    I know a good lesson if you want something bad enough maybe a bit of smarts and a lot of hard work might achieve your goal. You’ll feel better about yourself and you won’t spend years in jail

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    What next, the mafia or Hell’s Angels will send him an invitation?

  • avatar
    retrocrank

    ….just noticed (how did we not see this before?).

    ” ‘ i ‘ before ‘ e ‘ except after ‘ c ‘ ”

    Or is Matt putting himself on the story’s level so nobody will feel diminished? (still too high, Matt….)

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    When I was 5-6 I had an electric ride-in Jaguar, and had also driven gas-powered go karts by about then. I have no doubt I could have driven a real car just as well (I was a tall skinny kid until I went to college and er, “filled out”). Steering wheel steers, one pedal for go, one for stop, same as my little car.

    I would have gotten an epic beating for taking the family car for a spin, so I did not. There would definitely have been no hugs involved, and rightly so.

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