By on May 22, 2020

Alright, listen up. It’s Memorial Day weekend here in these United States, and pandemic or no, Monday is a day off.

Additionally, we’ll be closing it down a bit early today, somewhere around mid-afternoon.

As is usual, there may be a scattered post or two, and some tweets here and there, but mostly, we’ll be off from this afternoon until Tuesday morning.

Obviously, this year is different than most. We’re in the grips of a pandemic. The Indy 500 has been postponed, and beaches, restaurants, and bars may be closed where you live. If they’re open, they’re likely operating at limited capacity and with social-distance rules/guidelines. You may even still be under a stay-at-home order from your state or city leaders. I know I am for at least one more week (fingers crossed the metrics continue to trend in the right direction).

If you do go out, be safe. Wear masks (it’s for all of us — if enough of us wear masks long enough, the virus won’t spread easily), stay six feet or more away from strangers when possible, wash your hands and/or use hand sanitizer, and if you’re sick, stay home.

Before anyone accuses me of being political, please remember that I’m basing the advice in the previous graph off of what the health and science experts say. Nothing more.

We will get through this, one way or another. We may have to lose summer as we traditionally think of it, at least for this year (I hope not, but it’s hard to foresee a therapeutic being available before Labor Day, let alone a vaccine), but there are ways we can maintain some normalcy. Experts suggest being outdoors is safer than in, and if it ever stops raining around here, I plan on getting outdoors as much this weekend, and this summer, as possible, even if sporting events and concerts are off the table.

Of course, the combination of rain and no place to go may lead to a hopefully productive staycation. I’ve got a house that needs cleaning and video games that need playing. Either way, there’s no barbecues, brunches, or house parties in the plan this year. Or vacations. Last year, I got up early, fighting a mild hangover, to watch the Indy 500 from a Vegas hotel room. This year, I’ll be at home, like most of the rest of us.

Finally, I leave you with a reminder. Memorial Day wasn’t supposed to be about brats and baseball and burgers. It was meant to remember those who fought and died for certain values. Since you may be stuck indoors this year, take a second to reflect on that, especially if someone in your family died fighting for those values.

Hopefully, next year’s Memorial Day will be like all those that have come before. Let’s hope there’s racing with fans, open beaches, sports with packed stands, no masks, parades, and as much or as little social distance as we want. Until then, be safe, be well, and make the best of this most unusual holiday weekend.

We’ll see you Tuesday.

[Image: Ivan Marc/Shutterstock]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

35 Comments on “Housekeeping: Memorial Day, Socially Distanced Edition...”


  • avatar
    JimC2

    Memorial Day is for the war dead (not the living veterans) who helped keep us free to do things like debate politics. TTAC is for talking about cars and at most the odd, *brief* political tangent insofar as it involves cars.

    Thank you, Tim and the rest of the TTAC staff, for providing us a fun place to talk about cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @JimC2 – your post explains why the USA has Memorial Day and Veteran’s day. In Canada we have Remembrance Day Nov. 11 the same day as Veteran’s Day.

      Everyone have a safe and enjoyable Memorial Day weekend.

      Take a moment to thank those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

  • avatar
    JMII

    As my manager said: you’ve been doing a great job so go ahead and take Monday off :)

  • avatar
    CaddyDaddy

    After placing flags for our Kiwanis Club around town to honor those who gave their lives, CaddyDaddy will be heading to Utah for some river rafting. Please remember those who have sacrificed all and go out and have some enjoyment! were ‘muricans.

    • 0 avatar

      I’d like to return to Utah. Never been anywhere else so clean and scenic.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        ^^This^^ Salt Lake City is gorgeous, used to go there once a year for a business meeting and always looked forward to it

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        I’ve been to Utah, and Iowa, and both places have the cleanest freeway rest stops I’ve ever seen. Utah is definitely scenic. Iowa, well, I remember a cartoon called “Rappelling in Iowa”, with the rappellers moving horizontally. If you want to learn rappelling, Iowa is probably the safest place to learn.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        Outside of a few places in the Pacific NW, there is nowhere more stunning in the Lower 48 than Utah. If Zion doesn’t take your breath away, just go home and never leave the house again because nothing will impress you. Arches, Moab, GSL, Bonneville – that state was made to live and worship the outdoors!

        If you all can, get outdoors (safely) this weekend and get some fresh air in the lungs. I just did and I feel so much better.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It makes ya wonder if the confirmed kills had just that. No access to clean outside, even NYC, LA, London, etc, air. Or even if not infectious, forced HVAC recirculated farts 24-7.

          And when combined with lack of sun on the skin, zero exercise and or sweat, plus add a little ‘Rona?

          It’s goodnight Irene.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Research is demonstrating that those living in close quarters are more prone/susceptible. Cramped apartments, having to use elevators, little access to greenspace. All contribute.

            Which is why the trend to urban, high rise condo living may be curtailed and the old North American dream of a suburban, single family home with a yard may again come back into vogue.

            When I purchased our 1970’s suburban home, on a large lot, I instead could have purchased 3 older homes in ‘downtown’ Toronto or up to 5 large urban condos.

            Prior to the pandemic, each of those condos were selling for just less than my home and the downtown houses were selling for up to twice what |I could get for my house. I wonder if this will change once we return to the new normal?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s all about making that GTA. Good luck on that, but I spent too much on a drafty 1906 farmhouse on acreage 20+ years ago, coming from downtown apartments, and it was a definite boost in my health, even if not my net worth.

          • 0 avatar

            Downtown Canada will continue to be the best, most progressive and most enlightened place to live in North America. And you should pay for the privilege of such greatness all around you.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Corey: Did you see the pictures of the hipster doofi covidiots crowding Trinity Bellwoods Park yesterday?

          • 0 avatar

            I did, and especially nice that they took dumps on the property of residents around the park.

            Seriously dignified behavior.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Everywhere that was opened, the idiots of course gathered as close together as they cold….

            Expect spikes in covid-19 cases in 2 ~ 3 weeks, followed by “why me ?!” crying….

            Taking dumps on others yards is why it used to be legal to load your .410 shotgun with rock salt…

            -Nate

  • avatar

    Does it mean May 25th is holiday in Canada too?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Nope.

    • 0 avatar

      I got lost. Is it Canadian site or American site?

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Yes.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Both

        • 0 avatar

          I just wondering why TTAC is closed only during US holidays but not Canadian holidays.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Because the vast majority of traffic comes from people F-ing off at work in the US of A. So the best you are going to do on a US holiday is ~15-20% or usual M-F traffic. So not worth wasting new content on. Meanwhile on a Holiday Monday eh? 90% of the traffic is expecting new content.

          • 0 avatar

            “F-ing off at work in the US”

            Well most of them are locked at home week after week after week till the end of days.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Yes, now most are at home, but pre-corona that was the case.

          • 0 avatar
            Tim Healey

            Because most of our staff and contributors are based in the US, as is most of our readership. That said, our corporate parent is Canadian, but U.S.-based employees follow the U.S. holiday schedule. I do offer our Canadian folks the Canadian holidays as off days.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        The May holiday in Canada is Victoria Day, which is the official celebration of the Queen’s birthday and takes place on the Monday prior to May 24. When I was growing, up, we also called it “firecracker day”, as it was celebrated with fireworks.

        As in the rest of the Commonwealth, the major war dead commemoration is Remembrance Day, which is November 11 (the day the armistice ending WW1 was signed).

        As in other Commonwealth countries, Canadians wear poppies on their lapels during the days leading up to Remembrance Day as a sign of respect for the those who served, and especially those who fell. It’s a great tradition, which the Boomer generation (of which I am a part) did frankly not wholly embrace (rebels that we were, or at least pretended to be), but which has been readopted by Gen Y and Millennials – which kinda gives you hope for the future.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          @ect; well said. Growing up in the early to mid 60s I remember when traffic would pull over and stop and stores would dim their lights at 11:00.

          Remembrance Day went into decline during PEts time in office. But then he did not support our efforts in WWII.

          It has indeed thankfully been re-established.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            Arthur, thanks for your kind words. We seem to have grown up at about the same time (I was born in 1951).

            I was (to put it mildly) never a fan of Trudeau pêre (nor of Trudeau fils, come to that), but I can’t blame him for the decline in popular favour of Remembrance Day. It seems to have been a generational thing.

            I recall being in a movie theatre in the early ’70s with a then-girlfriend, when the short being shown before the feature included a short (15 seconds?) clip of Canadian Armed Forces personnel engaged in the rescue of civilian sailors whose boat had overturned. A surprising number of people booed at the sight of the uniforms – I was both startled and disgusted.

            When I returned to Canada in 2003, after several years in the US, I was again startled – this time by the fact that Gen Y and Millennials had embraced everything about Remembrance Day, of their own accord. As I said, gives one hope for the future.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Many thanks to the fine citizens of Canada for the delicious maple syrup in my cabinet right now (I hear they produce maple syrup in Vermont, but mine is imported).

        And of course, Peak Canada is the square-drive “Robertson” screw, which could have taken off for the fact that Henry Ford was… Henry Ford.

        “Henry Ford, after finding that the screw saved him about 2 hours of work for each car, attempted to get an exclusive licence for the use and manufacture of the Robertson screw in the US. He was turned down by Robertson who felt it was not in his best interest and shortly after that, Ford found that Henry F. Phillips had invented another kind of socket screw and had no such reservations.”

        Every time I deal with stripped threads on a Phillips screw (e.g., yesterday), I have unfavorable thoughts toward Mr. Ford. [Tip: If you must deal with Phillips screws, use a genuine ACR® (anti-cam out ribbed) bit on your cordless screwdriver.]

        Cadillac was an early adopter of the Phillips design. (Inferior to Robertson, but vastly superior to “Standard/slotted/flathead” if you’re assembling automobiles and don’t want to scratch still-soft paint.)

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P._L._Robertson

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_F._Phillips

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Canadian_inventions_and_discoveries

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          As a long time advocate for the Robertson, still manufactured in Milton Ontario, I greatly appreciate your post.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            RE: ‘Vermont Maple Syrup’ ~ some years back I began noticing all the containers saying “REAL VERMONT MAPLE SYRUP!” on then also said in the tiny print “product of Canada” .

            Go figure .

            I plan to take a Moto ride up the A.C.H. to – morrow, we’ll see about Monday .

            -Nate

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @ect: no ‘flannel’ just really like your posting(s). I too was opposed to PET, but in retrospect believe that he was correct in regards to his National Energy Program and Foreign Investment Review Act. The NEP would have ensured a set price for the extraction and sale of petroleum, a guaranteed internal supply and market for it and Canadian self sufficiency regarding petroleum exploration, extraction, refining, distribution and sales. FIRA would have prevented the decimation of Canadian manufacturing that we have seen occur.

            He did however oversee the dismantling of our independent military services, ending their traditions and combining them into the Canadian Forces. Thankfully Harper reversed this.

            I do believe that you are correct, that there is a strong generational component to how Remembrance Day is viewed.

            As to maple syrup, it is controlled by a marketing board, ensuring prices. The largest heist in Quebec history occurred in 2013 and involved $18 million worth of maple syrup.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Thanx for those who didn’t make it home again and for those who understand the need to never forget .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Maple syrup, Canada’s liquid gold.
    Spread on a lightly buttered toast, it is the breakfast of Gods.

    Re: Memorial day. A day of reflection.
    My son had a brother in law which was killed in Afghanistan, by an IED. Terrible.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • HotPotato: My Volt has been bank-vault solid — I credit the enormous T-shaped structural member down the center...
  • SV: “Your author has even grown fearful that the next batch of Volkswagens is really going to suck — despite...
  • Lou_BC: Family can be the worst. I had bought a brand new 1984 Ranger. It had pathetic tires stock. I let my brother...
  • Lou_BC: Hype is just that, hype. If it has the same off-road prowess as a Jeep and is more durable, it will sell. The...
  • HotPotato: Per the Indy Star article, undamaged cars are headed to L.A. to join the same company’s service...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber