By on April 6, 2020

1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille in Denver junkyard, LH view - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsCadillac had become by far the top luxury car manufacturer in North America by the early 1970s, with the all-time pinnacle of Cadillac production reached in the 1973 model year: 304,839 ’73 Cadillacs purred off the assembly line. Then, well, the Yom Kippur War pissed off OPEC’s most important members, European luxury cars gained more than just a minor foothold, and Cadillacs became so commonplace that their prestige value sank for the rest of the decade.

Here’s a big, plush Sedan DeVille, from the final year of Cadillac’s undisputed reign over the American road, photographed in a Denver self-serve car graveyard earlier this year.

1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille in Denver junkyard, LH view - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsBecause I always like to bring an old film camera with me when I hit the junkyard, I took a photograph of this car with my 1916 Kodak No. 00 Cartridge Premo, the smallest box camera Kodak ever made. I had to roll up some unperforated Orwo UN54 35mm film on homemade backing paper for this camera, because film photography is more fun if you make it more difficult. A couple of months later, I used this camera and three others from the era of the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic to document Denver in the early stages of the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic lockdown.

1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille in Denver junkyard, Rickenbaugh Cadillac emblem - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsRickenbaugh Cadillac has been in Denver since the 1940s, and that’s where this car was sold new. Its final resting place is less than eight miles from Rickenbaugh; I’m not sure if that makes its demise better or worse.

I found registration paperwork in the car, showing that its five-year Colorado antique plates has been valid until late 2019. From the street address on these papers, I tracked down the car on Google Street View. This photograph was taken in 2012, when this Cadillac’s paint and vinyl roof were in much better condition.

1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille in Denver junkyard, vinyl roof - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe last half-dozen or so years were not kind to this car.

1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille in Denver junkyard, clock - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsDid I buy the dash clock? You know I did! It doesn’t work, but I’ll open it up and see if it can be revived without too much hassle.

1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille in Denver junkyard, engine- ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsCadillac engine power numbers were down for 1973, thanks to both the Clean Air Act of 1970 (signed into law by that notorious freedom-slaughterin’ eco-fanatic, Richard M. Nixon) and the switch from gross to net power numbers. This 472-cube (7.7-liter) V8 had a rating of 220 horsepower and a still-impressive 365 lb-ft of torque. Looks like someone grabbed the Quadrajet carburetor, just as I did back in the 1990s when I needed a good Q-Jet for my hot-rod Impala sedan.

1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille in Denver junkyard, interior - ©2020 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe interior is pretty well destroyed, so there was never much chance of this car getting put back on the street. A sad end for a machine that sold for the equivalent of $39,500 when new. Actually, that price seems like a steal for this much car.

This 1974 Cadillac ad boasts about that high-water sales mark from 1973.

For links to better than 2,000 more Junkyard Finds, head over to the Junkyard Home of the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand™.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

65 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1973 Cadillac Sedan DeVille...”


  • avatar
    CaddyDaddy

    +1

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      +2 My dad had one just like it only dark blue with white top and white leather interior. I have fond memories of learning to drive on it and taking 4 or 5 friends for joy rides just to listen to the 4-speaker 8-track stereo. I even remember going with him to buy it new and him paying $7200 for it

      God, I’m old ;-)

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        My old man’s was a brown-on-brown ’72, and it was his first Caddy. God, was he proud of that car.

        I distinctly remember him playing “Hot August Night” by Neil Diamond on the eight-track.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          I had that Neil Diamond 8-Track, lol

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            That has been my ‘go to’ work out music since 1976. Even now at the university gym where I train, I put it on often when it is my turn to chose the music.

            Most satisfying is that after listening to my selections some of the students now play Neil Diamond and Marvin Gaye as their selections.

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        Good Lord! An 8-track AND four speakers. That was a huge audio upgrade back then.
        8-track tapes and players. So many fond and horrible memories of them. Tracks all mixed up from the original albums. Long songs fading out and back in because the tape had to switch tracks. A matchbook was a required accessory for the tape player if the tape wouldn’t play correctly – just wedge the matchbook under one side of the tape!
        But at the time it was one of the best (only) ways to take your music along with you in the car.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Never ran into that matchbook issue you mention but even back then I fully understood why song order was revised. After all, when playing an 8-track you were running a single 10 (or 15) minute strip of tape around the cycle four times and with two to three songs filling any one track, hopefully without going over.

          I also got pretty good at splicing those tapes back together as the foil tape/trigger had a habit of letting go after a few dozen plays.

          • 0 avatar
            Blackcloud_9

            Maybe not, but my brother and their friends were buying aftermarkets models that were probably not the best available due to limited funds. Also, I remember some of the tapes they had were pirated copies as well.
            Ah fond memories of listening to your favorite Black Sabbath/Led Zeppelin song and all of a sudden everything getting horribly garbled. You had to react quickly, yanking out the cartridge, hoping the tape player didn’t chew up too much of your precious music.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            And don’t forget ~ this was during a cruising craze and you needed some place to hide your joints and a ruined 8 track cassette was *just* the thing ~

            I can’t remember anyone ever getting busted in spite of being high as kites and smelling like Cheech & Chong….

            -Nate

  • avatar
    retrocrank

    my grandfather was fairly successful in his business and from maybe mid’50s traded for a new Caddy every two or three years. The last one was probably a ’73 or ’74. The gas crisis drove him to a MB turbodiesel for his next car, and after that he only had MBs.

    Also very cool making COVID photographs with Spanish Flu technology. Gotta like B/W film and old cameras.

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    Vinyl tops are the Devil’s work. Not just because they’re pretending to be convertibles, but because of the damage they do to the rear window pillars. My ’76 had holes you could put your fist through. The engine lives on, however.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      At one point you couldn’t even buy a Cadillac without a vinyl roof. It cut down on production costs not having to finish the welds

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Lie2me, that makes sense – so vinyl roofs are the automotive equivalent of popcorn ceilings.

        There is nothing like trapped moisture (plus iffy surface treatment of ferrous materials) to guarantee a pleasant long-term ownership experience.

        GM powertrain engineers looking at this engine bay: “These spark plugs are *way* too accessible – bury them deeper!” :-)

      • 0 avatar
        markmeup

        yes and no. but def not true as a Cadillac blanket statement though.

        I grew up in & around the biz 70s & 80s with Oldsmobile & Cadillac.

        To clarify, besides any model that had a required (non delete) vinyl roof, such as say an Eldorado Biarritz… there was only one instance of this that matched your statement. >>

        1st year production only on the Gen1 Seville which BTW for higher initial production quality control, also only came in the singular color combo for the first few months of production in mid/late 1975 for the all new 1976 Seville. And yes, the vinyl roof (padded Tuxedo Grain) was for that reason with the modifications to the body and the roof welds/seams near the back section. Soon after production smoothed out, still listed as standard equipment… they began offering a vinyl top delete option.

        FWIW, related to the car in this article, my Mother drove a ’73 SDV light blue metallic with white tuxedo grain roof and white leather.
        On the Seville… I still own a final production year Gen1… 1979

    • 0 avatar
      Erikstrawn

      Actually, they did a nice job of bondo’ing the roof seam.

      Plugs? Mine were easy to reach, but I’m 6’0″ with gorilla arms. If you drop the motor in a Jaguar they get even easier to reach.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Awesome B&W photo, now I have a research that camera. I like to shoot B&W and develop myself but I’ve never used a camera that old. Did you print it or scan the negative? Any digital enhancement?

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    When my father was in the printing business, in the 60’s and early 70’s, he used to lease Cadillacs, first for 36 months, then for 18. They were always convertibles, though he rarely put the top down. These cars are huge outside, when measured by length and width, but they were low and weren’t really that roomy. The trunk was particularly shallow and wouldn’t carry much luggage since you had to lie it flat.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I remember the chrome fender trim on top next to the hood contained three lights, lights on/brights on/ turn signal on, what a great idea along with the cornering lamps that you no longer see in cars

    • 0 avatar
      markmeup

      +1 yes, mine still work on the ’79 Cadillac although i need to take a look because a couple of them are quite dim (often just cable dirty or loose).

      ‘Lamp Monitors’ many people think that they operate with light bulbs… which technically would defeat their purpose of indicating burned out bulbs on the car.

      They run via clear fiber optic cabling that runs thru the body of the car out to the front fender caps and rear, visible in your driver’s rear view mirror, in the rear seat, mounted up above the back glass in red, for the brakes and turn signals. They even used clear fiber cable for the back-lighting on my drivers outside mirror optional ‘illuminated thermometer’ to increase reliability & alleviate the access difficulty of a bulb burning out.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      My ’17 LaCrosse has cornering lamps integrated into the headlight assembly. For the life of me, I cannot figure out where the light-bulb is that shines to the left or right when I turn in that direction but yet it does. It’s one my most-loved features on the car. Because it harkens back to the day when having cornering lamps was a true sign of a luxury car.

      • 0 avatar
        markmeup

        that’s a nice touch. I love (and miss) cornering lamps, aesthetically and functionally. I’m sure you enjoy the car, as I do my 300S.
        shame about the LaCrosse not being around here any longer as it was the only car left in the line-up that had any semblance or air of what a BUICK is or i guess i should say ‘was’.

        When i see those recent BUICK commercials where they say BUICK like 17x in under 1 minute attempting to drill it into your skull… i just think of many models from the 60s thru the 80s, SMH and sigh. For with whats in front of me on the screen, there’s not a BUICK anywhere to be found.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      My GTI has cornering lights. So do many other European cars. Even my old Saab 9-5 had them.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Repurposed fog lights that mostly face forward, while better than nothing, don’t count. A proper cornering lamp is on the side of the car and illuminates a driveway or alley while you are starting the turn into it. I haven’t had a car with them since my ’89 SHO, although I’ve had several with “cornering” fog lights or swiveling headlights.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Yeah fogs are better than nothing but don’t come close to real cornering lights,l and the steering headlights don’t help and you need the cornering lights to know when to start turning the wheel.

          The interesting thing is they now come on Isuzu/GM LCF trucks. So why can’t we have them on cars again?

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    Yea that’s dirt cheap for a “luxury car”. The well known GM hubris lead them to sell away Cadillacs prestige in the pursuit of sales. It’s a disaster the brand would never recover from.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      take a look at the ’73 Caprice Classic, and you can see what started chipping away at Cadillac’s status.

      http://www.hemmings.com/stories/article/1973-chevrolet-caprice-classic

      • 0 avatar
        Opus

        You could have told me that first picture was a Caprice and I wouldn’t have known any different.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Good point. Not just the Caprice, but the Buick Electra, Olds 98, and Pontiac Bonneville were all variations, with just the engine and minor sheet metal differences. In the 1950s, Cadillacs and Buicks were on bigger platforms than Chevy, Olds, and Pontiac.

        By 1973, there was a couple inches difference in the wheelbase, mostly due to front end differences – from the windshield back, they were pretty much the same car. They sold a lot of each marque though. The Cadillac just didn’t stand out as much as it used to.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          There was a difference, my mother had a Chevy of this vintage and the difference between the Chevy and the Cadillac were enormous. Where the Cadillac felt heavy and weighted with tomb-like quiet, the Chevy felt tinny and noisy by comparison

          Buick Electras and Olds 98s were very similar to the Cadillac in size and comfort, but they were also only about $1500 cheaper. The extra $1500 for the Cadillac was basically a badge charge

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            I had a 1975 Caprice Classic, fully equipped including the 454 cid engine (running about 225hp).

            I will admit that the Cadillac had a nicer interior, was slightly quieter, and I seem to remember them braking ‘better’ (although that just might be my memory). In particular the instrument panel on the Chev was lacking in interior lighting and ‘ergonomics’.

            However those Chevs were deservedly referred to as ‘Highway Queens’.

  • avatar
    justVUEit

    No factory cruise, tilt wheel, or automatic headlights.Looks like no rear defroster either.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      The stalk looks like it’s been replaced, but I see both the factory actuator (the box with the vacuum hoses and electrical connector, with the two screws on the front, on the left inner fender), and an aftermarket bellows type actuator on the firewall (with a piece of heavy duty perforated universal strap with a 45-degree twist, held down by the diagonal front sheet metal brace). If you zoom in, you can see the vacuum hose nipple coming out of the back of the bellows. There’s also an idle-up solenoid for the a/c, on the driver’s side of where the carb used to be.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @justVUEit: Now that you mention it, that looks like the same aftermarket cruise controller I installed on my ’73 Ford Gran Torino about 10 years later. Didn’t notice the headlamp switch or defrost/defogger, though in ’74 they weren’t exactly standard equipment, even on Cadillacs, though they were options by then.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I don’t think that’s the factory actuator, either on the Cruise Control… that looks suspiciously like the way I hung the aftermarket one on that Ford I mentioned.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I’m wondering if the factory cruise control died at some point. It has what looks like an aftermarket stalk, and it looks like there’s both GM and aftermarket actuators under the hood.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The Sedan Deville had automatic headlights and auto dimmer. It did not come standard with cruise. My mother had a 72 Sedan Deville metallic aqua with cloth and leather trim seats in aqua. It had a white vinyl top that would show every spec of dirt and dust. The 472 Cu in V-8 was a beast and was very easy to work on. The Deville would get 8 mpg whether you were going 50 or 90. Very roomy and very comfortable.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    Interesting that you referenced the Orwo film. When I was an undergrad lad, in a semester abroad in Scandinavia, myself a 2 chums took a week long train journey during our fall holiday. It was 1990, 1 year after the fall of communist regimes in central Europe, so that was the “it” place to go. Berlin, Prague, Budapest, with an unscheduled side trip to Dresden. I had a ubiquitous Pentax K1000. When in Prague we stumbled into a camera store, and I bought several rolls of some soviet slow-speed B&W film (the exchange came to .50 a roll IIRC) and some Orwo color film. Both films really caputured the mood and atmosphere of our journey. The B&W pics came out somewhat dark, hazy, and shadowy. Great architecture shots and portraits of my travel mates.

    The color shots came out looking kind of faded. Don’t know if it was my mediocre photography skills, incorrect processing, or the film itself, but imagine if you were looking at faded prints from the 70s today. Was perfect for shooting in (East) Berlin though, kinda gray skies, gray architecture, and washed-out colors of orange, tan, and robins-egg blue Trabants.

    • 0 avatar

      “it was my mediocre photography skills, incorrect processing, or the film itself, ”

      I bet it was film not you. All B&W and color photos made during Soviet era were like that except or ORWO CHROM color slide films. ORWO was made in East Germany. Soviet color slides were substandard and colorless. So only decent looking photos I made before was able to buy Kodak’s in 1990s were ORWO CHROMO slides.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    From a contemporary viewpoint, the size of the passenger compartment relative to the rest of the enormous car is borderline comical.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Not too different from the ’79 model my parents bought used in the mid- to late ’80s. That silver paint in use at the time tended to fade badly in direct sun so while the car itself was in surprisingly good shape, the silver-over-black two-tone was already ragged. A repaint using several clear-coats over the pigmented paints made a huge difference in its appearance and the car survived almost 18 years in the family before they replaced it with a 2004 model (which I hated, but obviously had no say in the purchase as I was living 700 miles away and still do.)

    Funny though… My dad got on my case (despite my being an independent adult) when I bought a ’96 Camaro, calling it an impractical status symbol… yet he’d already been driving the Caddy for nearly 10 years. Talk about an impractical status symbol!!! Now I drive a so-called mid-sized 2019 pickup truck with more horsepower than either of those other cars and one heck of a lot more practicality for my needs.

  • avatar
    randyinrocklin

    Another nice carcass of a caddie to rebuild to awesomeness by “Count Customs” out of Las Vegas. I love his stuff!!

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    I’d buy a new fullsize Caddy for 39 Grand all day long.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    My G’pa is another who bought a new Caddy every couple years, he had a ’75 in rose with white top that was brand new when it carried my sister home as a newborn.
    As a little kid I loved the skirts and how they made it appear even longer. When he got the new (blue) one in ’78, I was appalled at the downsizing and lack of skirts :)

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    The father of my girlfriend at the time had one and would let us use it, if I could not get access to one of the Old Man’s Lincolns. He preferred to have his daughter driven in luxury/safety than in my VW.

    Everyone of my friends/family, believed the Lincoln of that era to be superior in what was then considered ‘luxury’ appointments. And much ‘better looking’.

    Another thing that I remember is that many Cadillacs of that era had a slightly ‘offset’ steering wheel. It was not quite centred. Does anyone else remember this?

    It’s a shame what happened to this survivor since the Google picture was taken. Wish that people who ‘hoarded’ projects, etc would instead just sell them to those who would drive, restore or take care of them. Too often we see what could have been restorable cars now sinking into the ground or rusting out because their owner is ‘hoarding’ them.

  • avatar

    Of all the things Cadillac did wrong, the worst thing ever was chasing market share, which destroyed one of the most important luxuries of all for most of its target buyers…EXCLUSIVITY.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    The all new 71-76 full sized GM cars seemed to be not as well built as their 69-70 predecessors. An uncle of mine, a long time Olds 98 buyer had a 76 98 four door with most options. He had an issue, similar to this Cadillac with rot occurring under the rear moulding. Also on many of them the frameless side windows could get out of alignment and weatherstrip prematurely deteriorate, something that occurred on the 73 Impala coupe that I once owned.

    I had a couple of neighbors who owned the Buick Estate wagon of the same vintage. Roomy and robust for towing with the 455ci but the fit, finish and trim was subpar plus the clamshell tailgate (Hmm maybe some crossover ought to bring that back)would get jammed. Fun fact there were two versions of the clamshell tailgate. A power where you turned the key and it did all the work and a manual operated when you had to push down on it to retract into the floor.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    Seeing a “picture-fest” like this one reminds me how fortunate I am to still have the 1974 Oldsmobile Toronado I got free in 2005. It came from the mountains near Yosemite but was originally sold by Bob Black Oldsmobile in Santa Ana, California. To obtain the car you simply had to be the first to say “Yes” on the Toronado chat line.
    One of the first things I did was to block off the simple non-functioning EGR valve and then have the car repainted in the original Cranberry color.
    I had the transmission rebuilt by the Motorman’s Leon’s Transmission in La Mirada. It is now in Downey, CA awaiting an upgrade to electronic ignition.

  • avatar
    craiger

    We had a ’73 Fleetwood growing up. First car I ever drove by myself. Curiously the clock was unique in a small way. They used iiii for the number four instead of the usual iv. I recall while we learning about Roman numerals in school, I mentioned to the teacher that little discrepancy in the Caddy’s clock. I loved that car.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      And of course GM used ‘gages’ instead of ‘gauges’ in that era. The urban legend was that omitting the ‘u’ saved money.

      Does anyone else remember the slightly offset steering wheels that plagued Cadillac during that era?

    • 0 avatar
      Steve S.

      Pretty much all clocks and watches that use Roman numerals do that.

      https://www.facebook.com/notes/js-watch-co-reykjavik/have-you-ever-wondered-why-the-roman-numeral-for-4-on-watches-and-clocks-read-ii/433524526255/

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        It’s one of those things about clocks with Roman numerals that you probably never noticed before, but once someone points it out then you can’t help but notice it.

        It sort of visually balances the look of the clock face.

  • avatar
    Oldschool

    I used to own a 72 Sedan Deville back in the day and I loved how that car ran. The 472 big block made for some very smooth effortless power, but the quality of the entire car was cheap to say the least. Fit and finish was bad, the door panel arm rest all had cracks in them. Every door! The door pulls were loose and felt like they were going to rip off at times. The body had a lot of squeaks and rattles and the center post rubber strip fell off on the passenger side so there was always a large gap that looked terrible and allowed moisture and water into the cabin.

    The car also had rotting underneath the Vinyl top near the trunk lid. Cadillacs of that era were known for this. The car felt like a tank, but unfortunately it just didn’t have the quality or “tightness” of its previous years.

    My 64 Cadillac is a night and day difference as far as quality goes compared to the cheaply made 72.

    Even my 78 Lincoln Continental has a smoother, softer, more solid like ride quality than that 72 Cad. Even the interior trim is a little better in quality besides for the cheap ass dash in the 78 Lincoln. The Lincoln’s body has held up much better too. The quality of the exterior trim is much nicer on the Lincoln. With real chrome metal trim for the light housings, and grill, the sheet metal feels very thick for being a 78, i can’t imagine how much thicker and higher quality a 72 Lincoln would be. As a matter of fact I know someone with a 72 Lincoln and it’s hands down a better car than a Cadillac. Caddy really cheapened the brand in 71, even the 1970 Caddy was a better built car. It wasn’t until 77 with the downsizing, did Cadillac finally bring back most of its quality that was lost during the 70’s. You think the newer something is, the lesser the quality, well it was the opposite with the 77 models even up to the 92 Broughams, Cadillacs quality especially on its interiors were really nice and held up better than the 71-76 era.

    One could say Lincoln was the better built luxury ride certain years. Although Cadillacs drivetrain was outstanding during the 60’s and 70’s. Lincoln’s drivetrains were good too, but they weren’t special like the 472-500 Cadillac motor. They’re just Fords underneath it all. The Ford 460 and C6 tranny are stout drivetrains, but again nothing that was exclusive to Lincoln.

    I believe the last “Lincoln only” power train was the 430 MEL big block in the 60’s. Great engine BTW. My 61 Lincoln Continental was butter smooth, but had nowhere near the smooth ride quality and float like my 64 Cadillac has. The Lincoln had too many issues from severe rust eating away at the body, to electrical and vacuum related problems that it wasn’t worth keep anymore. plus they are a nightmare to work on, but man was that Lincoln built like a freakin Abrams tank! I miss the old school build quality of the past which will never be replicated ever again. I’d take any mint mid Sixties Lincoln or Cadillac any day over a new Rolls Phantom or Bentley whatever.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Compared to some other early 70s cars the Cadillacs were much better not only engine but in body. A lot of cheapening of bodies and interiors during the 70s and 80s. For a while in the late 90s and early 00s the interior and bodies were getting better but recently the manufacturers have gone to using more plastic door handles, cheaper exteriors and interiors. Seems the trend is toward cheaper parts that do not last and I doubt the manufacturers will go back to using more quality components.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    A curmudgeonly old doctor I knew growing up liked to say “Buicks are for doctors. Cadillacs are for (unprintable epithet)s and chiropractors.” Chiropractors, in his mind, were the lowest of the low, the nadir of pseudo-scientific quacks. Eventually they were supplanted in his hierarchy of scumbags by homeopathic “doctors” and laetrile peddlers. By that time, GM was in its dark malaise days of badge engineering, and he had long since swapped the Buick for a Mercedes.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    The tin worm kills another .

    Good to see someone harvested much of the front end .

    Thanx for the B&W link, pretty neat .

    -Nate

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • JimC2: “This” is just the latest version of an old thing. “And postin’ “Me too!”...
  • teddyc73: How good looking should it have been? Auto Exec: So this is your Mercury design. Hmmm, It’s better...
  • teddyc73: @ Mike Beranek People are still posting the word “this”? I thought that trend died.
  • teddyc73: What about the ones with the 3.5? My 01 LHS had no issues. Fantastic beautiful car. Although, I also had no...
  • namesakeone: One of the last comments on this bringatrailer.com entry, apparently from the winning bidder, states...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber