By on February 27, 2020

2016 Chevrolet Impala LTZ Detroit - Image: GM

Mark this date on your calendar or, should you be so inclined, in your diary. Today — February 27th, 2020 — marks the end of the Chevrolet Impala.

Some 62 years after its launch, the last Impala sedan will roll off the line Thursday at General Motors’ Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant, The Detroit News reports. A very different future awaits both the factory and the industry, and it seems cars like the Impala have no role to play in it.

It’s been a long time coming.

Originally slated for death by the end of 2019, the Impala earned two short-lived reprieves, pushing the second date on its tombstone to today. Dead alongside the Impala is the Cadillac CT6, a much more youthful model, but nonetheless the spiritual successor to all the full-size Caddy sedans that graced the avenues and byways of America since the gangster era.

gm

Instead of going into mothballs like CEO Mary Barra originally intended, Detroit-Hamtramck will now pivot to electric vehicle production — an interesting new role for a land-gobbling plant that cranked out higher-end GM sedans since the 1980s. With the plant’s metamorphosis comes a nameplate resurrection: Hummer, slated to become a model under the GMC badge. An EV pickup, if you can believe it.

But the Impala’s story ends here. Bowing for 1958 and becoming arguably the biggest name in family haulers, the model spawned 10 generations and remained a fixture in the Chevrolet stable until 1985, when GM axed it in favor of continued Caprice production. When the Caprice joined the full-size Chevy lineup as an upscale Impala in 1965, the automaker sold more than a million of the combined nameplates. America was on wheels and Chevy had what it wanted.

Following the era of bloated Detroit barges in the early and middle 1970s, the Impala’s 1977 downsizing was a coup for GM. It was the first of the Big Three automakers to rethink the packaging of its largest sedans; rivals Ford and Chrysler brought up the rear with smaller, lighter full-sizers in ’79, just in time for another oil crisis.

Not content to lie dormant forever, the Impala returned in murdered-out SS form in 1994, offering horsepower-seeking family types and rappers alike a menacing chariot with which to drive to grocery stores, recording studios, and nighttime drug buys near the docks. An instant collectable, the rear-drive Impala SS met its end in 1996.

But Chevrolet wasn’t done milking public goodwill from the model’s instantly recognizable name. When it was decided the brand needed a large-ish V6-powered sedan with optional front bench to replace the Lumina, Impala stepped into the fray, and soon proved a hit. The eighth-generation Impala sold reliably and popped up in fleets everywhere. Its presence was ubiquitous among vehicles requiring bodyside lettering, and your author can attest to the fact that its 3.8-liter V6 and four-speed auto will remain operational even after the body has scattered itself, here and there, across the Earth’s surface.

When a successor arrived for 2006 with an updated body and the same general recipe intact, sales rose to even greater heights. We’re not talking ancient history here, yet is seems wild that, in 2007, Chevy sold 311,128 Impalas. A High Value 3.5-liter V6 joined the engine roster as a base offering at the start of the ninth generation, replacing the previous 3.4L unit.

Personally, a sleeper sedan I wouldn’t mind getting my hands on is the final year of that generation, when GM updated the Impala with a modern DOHC 3.6-liter and six-speed automatic. The final generation bowed for 2013, by which time the Great Recession was rapidly fading in America’s rear-view. Interest rates were low, consumer spending was up, and automakers couldn’t wait to get buyers into a crossover.

The Impala’s fate was sealed because, as we all know, once you go crossover, you never go back. From 2010, when GM sold 172,078 Impalas, the model’s fortunes declined year after year, with 2019’s tally coming in at 44,978.

As American as a sedan can be, the Impala’s contribution to U.S. driving culture is vast. It’s a nameplate that will be forever synonymous with large domestic sedans, and, perhaps because of this association, it will be forever tied to the “Old GM,” the “Old Detroit,” and the way things used to be.

Time will tell if GM ever dusts off this name again.

[Images: General Motors]

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78 Comments on “See the USA in Something Else: Death Comes for the Chevrolet Impala...”


  • avatar
    cprescott

    It wasn’t the worst Impala ever, but it was an unremarkable appliance. Decent value if you could endure the quality issues that seem to have infected most models over the last five to seven years.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I haven’t seen a new Impala on the road in a coon’s age. Who buys them? Impala should have gone the way of the Mercury Division at the same time; the day that Mercury died.

      Another GM product whose time has come and………..gone.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        HDC ….I traded my 15 Mustang in on a loaded 19 Impala …Black with the Premier package….Properly detailed the Chevy looks great .

        I am very much aware of the lousy resale price.. I guess I’l think about that when I need to ..Right now I’m very happy driving it.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Hey Mikey, the bottom line is always that the buyer chooses what makes them happy.

          I wanted to remind everyone that OEMs are cutting back on offering sedans in favor of pickup trucks and SUVs/CUV’s.

          Right now my wife and I are driving our daughter’s 2013 Odyssey, and it gets us around while we’re here in the States. But I believe that minivans are also destined for extinction.

          Sedans and minivans are sooooooo last century.

          BTW, good to read you’re still around.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Like Murilee’s, the only Impala I owned was a 1965 4-door sedan. It was pretty durable, and later model upgrades were cheap and fit perfectly.

      I got almost exclusively Impalas from rental agencies – they always upgraded me to them. They were familiar in layout to anyone who had driven a GM car in the previous 40 years, and ride and handling were predictable. Since I didn’t own one, I can’t speak to reliability, but I put hundreds of miles on rentals and never had a problem.

      People who rode in them with me had a problem, with the lack of rear headroom and difficulty getting luggage into the small trunk opening. My problem was keeping the slanted rear window clean. More swoopy cars solved that problem – you can’t see out the back window anyway.

      It looks like the 4-door coupe concept killed the Impala and all other big sedans. A formal roofline would solve the headroom problem,a more vertical rear window would solve the dirt and visibility problem, and the vertical window would solve the small trunk opening problem. Apparently it costs too much to build them that way.

      • 0 avatar
        thx_zetec

        I agree. Part of what is killing the sedan is the impractical design. TIny mail-slot trunklid, not much rear headroom, low-to-ground with big expensive painted piece of trim about 3/32″ from the pavement, windshield sloped so much you compromise visibility.

        You could drive a 72 Impala over some pretty rough roads. Modern sedans get 4000 dollar damage driving over a frost heave.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      it was a flop

      I blame the styling

      weirdly over styled and such a high belt-line

  • avatar
    Crosley

    This last generation Impala was maybe the last GM car I ever even considered buying. I ended up instead going with a Lexus ES350. Just concerns over quality and resale value and new they were basically the same price as the Lexus. but I wanted to like the Imapala, good size, nice lines, big backseat, etc.

    I honestly don’t know who arrives at the conclusion of buying one. $40k for a loaded one that will be worth next to nothing as soon as that warranty is out. Something like a Lexus ES is 10 times the car for only a little more money.

  • avatar
    Oldschool

    That Impala in the pic with the San Diego skyline in the back drop looks exactly my Impala, same color in everything.

    The last gen Impala was a great effort by GM at making this car worth owning instead of renting. It has good styling, the design still looks modern and great today although its design is already 6 years old. It also stands out from the majority of midsize sedans.

    One factor that led me to purchase my 17 Impala was surprisingly good build quality compared to its competition and it has great value for the price. In many ways this car feels German built. GM made sure this gen was reliable, and built well since It feels premium.

    It’s very smooth and quiet, rides well, obviously not as nice as the old body on frame impalas from decades past, but better than most sedans.

    I’m going to be pretty bummed out for awhile since this car won’t be produced anymore, as well as the Caddy XTS and Buick LaCrosse.

    The Epilson II platform being GMs best sedan platform in a long time that is not only reliable but overall a well built capable platform. Its sad to see it go. When people say GM doesn’t know how make good cars, the Epilson II cars was an exception. Their small cars are trash however, but they always knew how to make great big cars and there’s no denying that throughout its history with the wonderful Chevys, Cadillacs, Buick’s, Pontiacs, and Oldsmobiles,from the 50’s-70’s.

    • 0 avatar
      Menar Fromarz

      Generally I would agree your statement about GM small cars.
      However we just bought a ‘12 Volt and I have to say I’m still amazed there is a bow tie on the steering hub. It’s literally awesome. The feel of it, the quality of the leather, the lined cubbies everywhere. The whole thing is shocking to me that it’s a GM product. I guess there are always exceptions.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Is that the first iteration, or the second generation, with the body style similar to the last Cruze?

        If the former, it’s well-known that first Volt was overbuilt, sort of like the 1992-vintage Toyota Camrys, which were really Lexus ESses with cloth interiors and manual A/C.

        • 0 avatar
          Menar Fromarz

          First. I like it better than the revision. The second became indistinguishable from the Cruze and lost its unique identity. In black it’s quite striking with the black leather and chrome wheels.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Too little car for too much money, not a terrible car by any means but worth half as much as the asking price suggests.

    The W-body at least combined value in the proposition making it an easier decision. Realistically if the best you can offer is front drive and V6 consumers should not expect a price tag of nearly $40k it’s insane.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Nice writeup, Steph – kind of a life history for me in those pictures.

  • avatar
    retrocrank

    Impala, we’ll miss you.

    In the 60s it seemed that except for the occasional Beetle, Corvair, or Galaxy, all the guys working at American Standard, Ensign Wire, or Standard Tool drove Impalas to work. Usually in DuoTone colors, light blue or black, and rust.

  • avatar

    RIP in pieces, as the young people say.

    The current one was just too much money above the base trim. It does look nice though, especially in emerald metallic.

  • avatar
    phreshone

    Another classic case of GM killing a car just as they get it right (visibility aside)

    GM just hasn’t figured out that it’s got to get down to two trim levels per nameplate. (if not one for Buick and Caddy)

    Cut down manufacturing labor and inventory costs so you can list price at a level to get people to the showroom…

    this is the platform that should have generated a plastic-cladded wagon Subaru fighter. perhaps even a Nomad sport wagon…

  • avatar
    IBx1

    “the Impala returned in murdered-out SS form in 1994”

    Bright aluminum wheels, purple paint, chrome window trim, crystal clear headlights, and slightly tinted rear taillights are “murdered-out?”

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      Other than the rims, there was very little chrome on them, compared to everything else. IIRC, most of them were black, with a few some kind of a dusty green.
      At a car show back in that time period, there was a black one and when he popped the hood, what to my surprise appeared a very stock looking 454! Nice.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    “…With the plant’s metamorphosis comes a nameplate resurrection: Hummer, slated to become a model under the GMC badge. An EV pickup, if you can believe it.”

    If Ford could pull a similar stunt with the Mustang-E, I would say that GM does have a chance with a Hummer-E.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Personally, a sleeper sedan I wouldn’t mind getting my hands on is the final year of that generation, when GM updated the Impala with a modern DOHC 3.6-liter and six-speed automatic.

    I guarantee nobody will look twice. Part of the invisibility factor is that a 2006–2007 Accord look similar from the rear.

    IIRC the 3.6 V6 VVT DI with six-speed auto was actually a tick faster than the 5.3 V8 FWD version that had been an SS shortly before that. However the V8 will sound better, right until it eats its transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      No, I think the oddball FWD V8s remained the fastest-ever Impalas, 0-60 in 5.6 seconds according to Car and Driver.

      I had a weird encounter with one last summer. It was one of those incredibly rare cases of someone who was driving VERY quickly but also VERY carefully on a US public road – great lane discipline, signaling, leaving others a wide berth, accelerating and decelerating smoothly. I was like, “OK, even though that guy’s going about 25% faster than everyone else, I also judge him to be less of a danger than 95% of the other cars I’ve encountered today.” The car was also in immaculate condition. I thought, “That guy is an odd duck, but I’m kind of happy for him that he clearly likes his Impala SS so much.”

      I’m curious as to his car’s service history too. Did the smooth driving mean the transmission held up? I feel like 99% of those Impala and Monte Carlo SS owners were doing a lot of FWD burnouts.

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        “Did the smooth driving mean the transmission held up?” Hmm, I would guess not. But a rebuild should be less than $3k in any case, so if he really likes the car, it’s probably ok.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Worth noting too, the 3.6L DOHC in the W body impala lasted way more than a single model year. Introduced in 2012, 2013 final year of the W labeled as the “regular’ Impala, then it lasted for 3 MORE years as the “Impala Limited.”

      I love their handsome styling and classic 90s throwback mousefur velour and painfully fake woodgrain trim, and low dash. And sadly they really handicapped the 3.6L in the W bodies with a super tall first gear. It’d easily be half a second quicker to 60 I think if it weren’t fighting that tall ratio out the gate. The Epsilon Impala with the same motor fixed this. But my biggest issue is with the 3.6L itself: timing chain stretch is still a very real thing on the LFX engines.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Peak Impala in the modern age was either.
    ~ 1984. B Car. Rear Drive. 5.0 V 8. F 41 suspension.
    Had one. great car.

    or
    ~ 2011 W body. low beltline. High value V 6. SIMPLE CONTROLS. Decent ride. 33 MPG high way.

    2014 on or what ever the new style is called. Pure Sheet. High belt line. Bad visibility. Complicated controls. And with the turbo 4??? Come on. HARD PASS SINCE DAY ONE

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Nope no turbo 4, either 175 hp naturally aspirated 4 OR 3.6 V6 – for the last MY of production the V6 became standard.

      The penultimate of the BOX B-body Impalas had to be a 1979 (2 years of production to improve assembly quality) with 350 V8 (4 barrel), F41 suspension, and hard to kill THM350 transmission. Oh got to have posi-trac too.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        +1 for that I4 correction, PrincipalDan. Not that failing to have one’s facts in order ever stopped a good B&B rant. And while I’d also much rather have the V6, the 2.5 I4 actually was adequate for most drivers (0-60 in the 8s).

        I think you mean “ultimate”rather than “penultimate.” Penultimate means second to last.

        And I approve of your Impala choice. Internet scuttlebutt is that the 1980 refresh cheapened the Caprice/Impala slightly. As such, I think the ’78s and ’79s are the sweet spot. My grandmother’s ’78 Caprice Classic was her favorite car over the course of almost eight decades of driving.

        Check out the price of the F41 option! http://www.angelfire.com/ia3/capriceclassic/1978.html

      • 0 avatar
        ravenuer

        Dan, heartily agree with your choice of the 79 B body Imp!! Exactly as I would have ordered mine.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Pour one out for Super Epsilon. In its final form, it was a tremendous platform.

  • avatar
    volvo

    Only experiences I have had with Impala is the 2 year old 58 which was my high school car and a 2019 rental a couple of months ago. Based on my 2019 rental the Impala’s death is well deserved.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    RIP. People either want a cheap and small car or a big and roomy CUV. Full size sedan like Impala is a hard sale these days. The car is fine, but I’m not looking for something in that particular size.

    • 0 avatar
      volvo

      Toyota and Lexus don’t seem to have a problem moving their full sized sedans.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Lexus is a luxury car – it’s like saying Audi doesn’t have an issue selling the A6 or Mercedes doesn’t have an issue moving E-Class or S-Class iron.

        Avalon sales dropped 18% in 2019 despite a new model introduction in March of 2018, a sales drop of 18% less than 24 months after a total model update is nothing but bad news. Further, Avalon fleet sales to rental and livery is more than token, so the numbers are even worse. Further, many fullsize models threw in the towel in 2019 (LaCrosse production stopped in February 2019 for example) so they aren’t even picking up more of the pie that other makes are walking away from.

        With unit sales at under 20K annual for the Avalon, I would say the only reason it exists at this point is that it shares the platform for the Lexus ES.

        Oh, and Lexus LS and GS sales in 2019 were a complete disaster.

        https://pressroom.toyota.com/toyota-motor-north-america-reports-december-2019-year-end-sales/

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        I owned a loaded 2009 W ..a 14 Epsilon with the dreaded 4 banger, and today I drive a loaded 19.

        Actually not bad looking cars ,especially when parked beside a Maxima or the even uglier Avalon.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Man, GM is stupid. Don’t they know how much of a mistake they’re making?” -Internet people who haven’t bought an Impala

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    Wouldn’t be surprised if GM slaps the Impala name on some electric crossover somewhere between the size of the Blazer and Traverse.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Epsilon Impala: Well-thought-out, comfortable, decent-driving sedan with just a couple of weaknesses: rear visibility and the lack of feature content available on the LaCrosse sibling. Looks overpriced at MSRP but you’re not payin’ anywhere near MSRP.

    W-Impala Mk 2: Cartoonishly overrated. Possibly the most unrefined six-cylinder car sold in the 2010s. Dumb gearing meant the DOHC 3.6L generated less speed than it did in other GM midsizers. Terrible seats. Even worse ride and handling. It will be the Burn in almost any Buy/Drive/Burn where it is included. The only redeeming thing was that the 5.3L transmission-eater version made a great noise.

    W-Impala Mk 1: When introduced, it was just another W-body. When discontinued, it was a deeply obsolete W-body.

    Bubble Impala SS: Looked nice, but a bit weak for something that tried to project so much attitude. Lost badly to my Taurus SHO in multiple drag races. Also had the terrible bubble-B interior (the boxes were so much better).

    Box Impala: Meh. The boxes didn’t really come into their own until after the Impala version was discontinued.

    I won’t opine on earlier Impalas as I never drove any of them, except to say that in the raging ’65-’66 debate I prefer the ’65.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I generally don’t disagree. A couple of nits.

      Final Impala was Super Epsilon based on Epsilon II (Epsilon I cars were things like the Saturn Aura and the Pontiac G6). I know, it is a nit, but it is more than a technicality. Super Epsilon was much better than the original Epsilon platform (and is a stretched version of Epsilon II).

      On the W-Impala Mk 2- cockroach grade reliability. This is the N-body of the 2010s. These things will run poorly far longer than when many of the competitors will continue to run at all. Given how cheap they are used, when you add that to the equation, they are good for what they are. Completely agree they don’t hold a candle to Camcord – but you’ll pay more, a lot more, and for Honda in particular, the legend of quality is now more legend than reality.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Those W-bodies are runners. I was working on one a month ago and I think I could keep it going until the sun exploded if so desired.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      With the 3.8, 3.5, or 3.9 under the hood, definitely. The LS4 has too much torque for the transmission. The good news is there are a ton of performance parts for the W-body GMs so a strong rebuild when the tranny fails in the 80K to 100K mile range will leave it running forever. I don’t think the particular flavor of 3.6 under the hood in the final W-body Impalas had the chain stretching issue, but happily corrected if wrong.

  • avatar

    Watch sales now increase for the Avalon. Those impala customers are going to be angry that their cars are cancelled and will go to the competition, I starting to realize now why GM’s market share is 16%.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      You’re likely right about the increase in Avalon sales.

      The local Chevrolet dealer is next door to a Toyota store owned by the same dealer group. Prior to GMs bankruptcy the Chevy dealer was a Chevrolet/Cadillac dealer. After the bankruptcy it seemed that every old guy driving a DTS traded for an Avalon (there isn’t a Lexus dealer within 130 miles.)

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @akear: Can I have some of what you’re smoking? Further up the string someone mentioned that the Avalon was down ~20% year over year over the last two years.

      What makes you think that folks who would be interested in buying an Impala would suddenly buy an Avalon (or any other sedan)? News flash: folks continue to purchase trucks and CUVs/SUVs at a phenomenal rate. That’s the reason why sedans are dead.

      The domestic manufacturers are being proactive (not that I’m personally happy about this development, but I don’t run their businesses, either), while the others hope to pick up marginal sales. I hope it plays out for them, but I think the vast majority of folks will abandon cars, no matter the brand.

      • 0 avatar

        You naively assume everybody wants trucks. That is certainly not true and is backed up by over 350,000 Camry’s sold each year. The sedan market is still larger than the pickup market. The reason Toyota is double the size of GM is due to the fact they offer vehicles in every market segment. Also, former Impala owners can purchase the higher quality RAV4 and Rogue.

        It is a blanket statement claiming everyone want trucks. It is simply not true.

        It is obvious to everyone that GM’s current strategy is not working. Why else would they be in fourth place in international sales? If and when the FCA/PSA merger is finalized GM will be in a pathetic fifth place !!

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        I naively assume that everyone wants trucks? Assuming you live in the US, have you seen the roads lately?

        Besides, why do you believe that everyone that wants a car will go for a milquetoast Camry or that all potential Impala drivers would want a somnolent Avalon?

        It’s obvious to me that the folks left selling sedans have to “run what they brung…”

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          As I linked to Toyota’s own sales numbers.

          Avalon sales declined even with the brand new 2018 model released. They dropped about 18% in 2019 and are under 20K units a year.

          GS sales and LS sales at Lexus were down in 2019 almost 50% YoY.

          Buyers don’t want sedans. Even the Camcord alliance is losing steam. Camry retail sales for 2019 was below 275K (about 60K went to fleet).

          Only 6 of the 20 top selling vehicles in the US for 2019 were sedans, and of those the best seller came in 8th place.

          Did you ever think you would see the day the Chevy Equinox would outsell the Toyota Camry both in total numbers and retail sales?

          That is how bad it is for sedans.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Toyota will RAISE the prices on the Avalon. No reason not to with Impala, the lower cost alternative, gone.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @HDC: Can I have some of what you’re smoking? Did you not notice that Avalon’s numbers are down 20 PERCENT YEAR OVER YEAR for the last two years? Why would you raise prices even in the event of losing a major competitor? The major competitor for the Avalon is ANY C/SUV on the market right now. Raising prices makes NO sense.

        Gaah, the Toyota Fanboi Reality Distortion Field is impressive. You folks just make crap up and think that no one has access, to you know, actual statistics…

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          geozinger, let’s just see what happens with Avalon pricing. My bet is that Toyota will raise prices on the Avalon, not reduce the prices to offset 20% lower demand.

          My best friend who owns a 2015 Avalon tells me that a similarly-equipped 2020 Avalon now costs 30% more, as in $30K in 2015 to $39K in 2020, for the same trim and equipment.

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            Sorry, I don’t see the logic here. Avalon has lost one sedan competitor, not the others. It certainly hasn’t lost any of it’s C/SUV competition, either.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Big, RWD, excess power, middle class affordability, Detroit styling inside and out. This is what Impala is to me and it ended in 1969.

    How many units does Chevrolet need to sell for a profitable program?

    Could GM feasibly engineer a RWD Impala from one of it’s SUV platforms and then build it in the same assembly plant? Traverse starts at under $30K MSRP and the Impala MSRP is $31,6XX. Is a sedan more expensive to manufacture?

  • avatar
    thx_zetec

    Very sad – for decades the impala was a GM mainstay. Never thought I’d see the day. If I was in the market for a large sedan I could check it out

    https://stories.newslions.com/the-incredible-moment-a-leopard-gives-kampala-the-kiss-of-death/

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I drove a ’91 305 powered Caprice for a few years; bought for $1800 sometime in the early aughts. It was a sloppy driving car (no F41 suspension), felt underpowered with 170hp pulling all that weight, but it was still a great highway cruiser. Basest thing ever – one giant non-split bench seat; my knees were squashed against the glovebox when my wife drove.

    Later I owned it’s more powerful sibling, a ’94 Buick Roadmaster with the towing packing. The LT1, F41, and 3.08 gears made a huge difference. One of my favorite cars of all time: Grandpa’s Impala SS!

    As time went by and as these old cars aged out my interest in GM dropped. The Marquis I had was nice but still not in the league as the Roadmaster. I want my big ol BoF cars!

    Anyways – I never would have thought the Impala name would ever die. It was as much as an American icon as the Mustang is; just a different type of car. But times change and GM has never been a good steward of their models.

  • avatar

    Today GM’s stock is at a 3 year low. They could dip under 30 usd for the first time in over 5 years.

    You cannot cut your way to success.

    GM is garbage. I have been saying it for years.

    This just in, GM’s stock has dipped under 30. It is currently 29.97 usd.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @ akear “Today GM stock is at a 3 year low” ??? You don’t suppose there’s a down turn in the stock market ???

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        People buy stocks for the future dividend-earnings they hope to receive. But if NO dividends or profits can be forecast, it is time to un-ass the stock market for more solid traditional investments.

        It’s amazing what damage a little microbe can do.

        And contagion has not peaked yet……

  • avatar

    POS.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The Chevy Impala and Buick Lacrosse are the last of the great sedans GM has made. Since I already have a Lacrosse I am not in the market for a new car, but I probably will never buy another GM product. The new Silverado is a botch up job as are most of the new GM products. I hate to think of how GM will botch up the new 2021 Colorado and Canyon. I wouldn’t miss GM if they totally went away.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      GM hasn’t been on my radar for years… with a few exceptions (Corvette, Regal TourX, Cadillac CTS-V, maybe a Camaro but that tiny greenhouse!) their recent vehicles leave me cold. And this from a guy who had a grandfather who was a GM line worker. And a dad who drove, except for a few Nissans, only GM vehicles. And I used to modify/upgrade/hotrod old G-Body Chevys.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      @Jeff S

      I am in a similar camp. I have a GMT900 2011 Chevy Avalanche with around 115K miles. I have the dash crack issue (GRRR) and the passenger side power mirror has gone inop. Outside of that, it just runs and looks about like the day I picked it up.

      I have a 2017 Buick LaCrosse with the 8-speed and 3.6 and I would say anyone espousing hatred for the E2XX Buick never spent any seat time in one. It is a tremendous vehicle but born in a time where sedans are dying. It isn’t flawless (the center console wastes space, the under bridge is hard to access, lack of heated rear seats, lack of power folding mirrors, lack of rain sensing wipers, weak headlights, all but the headlights are nits).

      It is a dream to drive, it’s faster than a Maxima to 60 and equal in the 1/4 mile, the girl can dance, and she isn’t bloated. The trunk is servicable despite the five-door hatch shape (that so many sedans have) and the backseat is very comfortable. The full speed cruise control is one of the best systems I’ve used, the cabin is bright, and the seats are extremely comfortable.

      But as you noted, there isn’t anything at this point that really excites me from GM. My next new to me vehicle has a solid chance of being my coffin car. Given I only drive the Buick 3K to 5K miles a year, I see this one in my driveway for a long time.

  • avatar

    The last really good GM car is the recently cancelled CT6-V.

    For the first time in their history GM may not be big enough to survive the next down turn. I read somewhere they are 40% smaller than they were in 2009. Is that possible? I know they sold almost 4 million less car than they did in 2010.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    APaGttH–I have a 2012 Buick Lacrosse that I bought off of a neighbor who babied it with only 45k miles. Ever since my wife and rented a 2014 Impala LTZ 5 years ago in California I have had my eye on either an Impala or Lacrosse–we fell in love with the car and it was the one vehicle that I ever rented that I hated to return. We rode in my neighbor’s Lacrosse over the past 7 years when we would take turns going to dinner with he and his wife. The comfort and ride of the car is like a true luxury car and we had decided when our neighbor decided to buy a new Rav4 and sell the Buick we made him an offer. I thoroughly enjoy driving the Lacrosse despite its large front console and trunk especially since it is an E-assist. The 2.4 with the E-assist has enough power for me and car is Gold Mist with Cashmere heated leather seats and full moonroof. I would have bought new but at 11k with 45k miles and all service records it was a great buy especially like you I put 3k to 5k miles on a vehicle a year. I telework 4 days a week and the 1 day I go into the office I take the Park & Ride which my employer pays for. I am less than 2 years from retirement and plan on keeping this Buick a long long time. I have owned mostly GM vehicles for the past 45 years along with Hondas, Fords, a Mitsubishi, and a Chrysler 5th Avenue. The handling and the smooth riding qualities is better than the 5th Avenue and even my mother’s 72 Cadillac that I would drive decades ago.

    • 0 avatar
      Oldschool

      Jeff, you’re totally right. GM built these cars at a time when they really needed to improve their vehicles tremendously as they were coming out of bankruptcy in 2008. When your down and out, the only way to go is up, and I believe GM put a lot of effort into making the 2014 Impala a much more premium car and you can tell by how well it is.

      Sadly Chevy never advertised the Impala in the many years it has been out and this has hurt the model in sales i feel since the focus went from cars to crossovers in such a short amount of time.

      My Impala has been one of my fav cars to drive as daily driver. One car I do miss having that I wish I never sold was my 94 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham. That thing was a beast! And it was so comfortable to drive. Plenty of power with the LT1 V8 to cruise up steep mountain roads or to blow past someone when you needed to merge. It had so much presence and reminded me of a modern day early to mid 70’s Cadillac Deville. Between my Impala and that Fleetwood, I used to love the older GM vehicles when they built them right, but their new stuff? Not so much.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      I have to throw in my appreciation for the post-BK GM cars. I had access to my daughter’s 2016 Malibu Limited for almost 2 years (she was on assignment and left me the car to drive). I came to appreciate the excellent build quality of the car, the performance and the mileage. When she came back to our part of the country, it was near the end of the lease and I was reluctant to give her the car back! I considered buying out her lease, but our other kid needed some financial assistance, so no buyout from Dad…

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    That ’64 is hilarious: 21 feet long with the rear legroom of a subcompact. It’s wild to me that the same Detroit that was a year or two before churning out an onslaught of brilliant compacts with smart packaging and innovative powertrains (compact Oldsmobile with an aluminum V8, anyone? sweet little Corvair Monza Turbo convertible?) — in fear of an American embrace of tight-handling European imports that didn’t actually happen for another 20 years — had already reverted its attention to this sort of land-whale goofiness, and that little more than a decade after that, they had made matters much worse with ponderous fuselage bodies and underperforming engines.

    The only Impala I had the pleasure of driving was a rental-grade base-model eighth-gen (early 2000s), complete with 180-hp 3.4 liter and plastic wheel covers to encourage you to pay just a liiiittle more each month for a much nicer midgrade model with 200 hp and alloys. Sure, it was a tarted-up Lumina, but it was big, cheap, light and economical to run for its size, and had an incredibly soft ride, and I quite liked its upright windshield for interior space and glare avoidance. It was an alien curiosity in California, but if you lived somewhere with frost heaves, lousy wages, and the social expectation to have kids young, it would make all the sense in the world…even though it meant living with worse handling than a Chrysler minivan and a serious risk of the Chinese-built transmission grenading by 80k miles. I wish I could have ponied up for the SS — that would give you back the missing handling, and let you dispatch 0-60 in 6.5 seconds, although I assume the supercharger would kill the fuel economy.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    That “Lord Vader” Impala SS ad remains one of my favorite print car ads. I had it hanging in my room when I was a kid and realized I need one for the Man Cave today.

    That and the Nissan GI Joe ad where he picks up Barbie in the 300ZX with Van Halen playing is peak car advertising in my mind.

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