Report: Porsche Macan Won't Ditch Gas Quite So Soon

report porsche macan wont ditch gas quite so soon

If a report in Car and Driver is correct, Porsche’s Leipzig assembly plant will soon be home to two overlapping eras — internal combustion, and what comes next. The site, upgraded in the previous decade, handles production of the Macan, which Porsche claims will don an all-electric powertrain for its next generation.

Not so fast, say company insiders.

Apparently, the unconfirmed plan is to keep the current-generation Macan in production alongside the EV-only version, albeit with a facelift to more closely resemble its electric successor. It’s similar to what Ram decided to do with its two 1500 pickups, with the motivating factor here being powertrain choice, not price.

Expected to roll out in 2022 or 2023, the upcoming Macan is seen as a gamble for Porsche, given that it’s the marque’s top selling model. It’s also a necessary evil — if you want to view it that way — to lower the automaker’s fleetwide emissions footprint.

This dual-Macan strategy isn’t just the result of short-lived product overlap during a production line changeover, either. According to a top-level exec, Porsche’s plan is to keep the refreshed older Macan in production for three years. “Such an important car can keep the internal-combustion engine even longer,” another source told the publication.

Such a move would keep the dollars flowing to fund the further electrification of the Porsche lineup, while at the same time offsetting development costs of the Macan successor. The model remains a popular entry point for Porsche customers.

Porsche’s 2019 sales were a bright point in the industry, with global deliveries rising 10 percent for the year. Macan sales almost topped the six-figure mark, rising 16 percent. In the U.S., where Porsche volume rose 8 percent, Macan sales fell slightly from their 2018 high water mark.

[Image: Porsche AG]

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  • Lstanley Lstanley on Feb 13, 2020

    The transition to all-electric vehicles sure seems to be happening faster than I thought would be the case.

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    • N8iveVA N8iveVA on Feb 14, 2020

      @hreardon I'm not saying there isn't a market for EV's, but I suspect that when they get to the point where someone walks into a Porsche dealer looking for a Macan and the only model offered is electric, a very high percentage will move on to something else.

  • Whatnext Whatnext on Feb 13, 2020

    As a confirmed crossover hater, I must admit I find the Macan appealling.

  • Johnster Not feelin' it. The traditional unreliability of turbo engines is a big turn-off, especially in a work truck that (I hope) you'd want to keep on the road for 200,000 miles or more without having major repairs.
  • ToolGuy Car audio is way overpriced.
  • Marty S The original Charger was a 2 door, as was the landmark 68 model. Its funny that some younger commenters are surprised that its not a four door. I never understood why modern Chargers have been four door sedans. I think the best looking Charger was the 68, absolutely perfect in its lines and proportions. This concept really emulates that and I think I think it looks great.
  • Master Baiter The D-bag elites like Al Gore demanding that we all switch to EVs are the type of people who don't actually drive. They get chauffeured around in black Yukon Denalis. Tesla does have a good charging network--maybe someday they will produce a car that doesn't suck.
  • MRF 95 T-Bird As a Challenger GT awd owner I lIke it’s heritage inspired styling a lot. There’s a lot of 66-67 as well as 68-70 Charger in there. It’s refreshing that it doesn’t look like a blob like Tesla, Volt/Bolt, Mach-e BMW I whatever etc. The fact that it’s a hatch makes it even better as a everyday driver thus eliminating the need for a CUV. If it’s well built and has a reliable track record I can see trading up to it in a few years.
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