By on December 4, 2019

The coming year isn’t just the first chapter in a new decade, it will also be the final year you’ll be able to purchase a new Buick Regal. For that matter, it’s the last year you’ll be able to buy a Buick car.

Confirmed by a brand spokesman, the 2020 model year will be the midsize Regal’s last in the North American market.

Built in Germany by former General Motors property Opel, the current-generation Regal appeared for the 2018 model year, offered in fastback-styled Sportback and brawny TourX wagon guise.

After Opel (now in the hands of Groupe PSA) revealed changes to the Opel Insignia for 2020, Buick confirmed to Motor Authority that the coming model year will be the model’s last — at least in North America.

2018 Buick Regal TourX

“Buick continues to be ahead of the consumer shift toward SUVs. In fact, nearly 90 percent of Buick sales to date this year have been crossovers,” said Stuart Fowle, communications manager for the Buick and GMC brands. “Although the Regal will no longer be offered in the U.S. and Canada, it will be sold in China where demand for sedans remains significant.”

Chinese-market Regals are built locally via Shanghai GM (SGM), a joint venture between GM China and its Chinese partner, SAIC. In that market, the model is offered as a pure sedan, rather than a liftback. A GS version ups the model’s looks, but not its horsepower.

Given China’s affection for the American brand, Regal sales in that country vastly outpace the model’s U.S. volume. American Regal sales by the end of September? 8,849. In China? 82,552.

While the Regal’s revamped looks and choice of bodystyles initially buoyed the Regal’s flagging sales in the U.S., it didn’t deliver the kind of volume GM might have hoped for. This year saw Regal sales fall 19.6 percent through the end of September. The only alteration to the model for the 2019 model year was the addition of a luxed-up Avenir variant (seen below).

Image: General Motors

It was long expected that the Opel sale would one day see Regal imports dry up. Earlier this year the brand dropped its fast-falling LaCrosse full-size sedan from the roster at GM’s Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant and discontinued the oveases-built Cascada convertible, making the Regal its soul passenger car offering. Now, that model has just a year to live.

Again, it’s not unexpected. Buick utility models like the Encore, Envision, and Enclave are up 6 percent, 10 percent, and 16 percent, respectively, through September, and there’s a tweener Encore GX on the way to capture additional buyers in the low-priced space.

From three cars to zero in the space of a year, making Buick a utility vehicle-only brand.

A sign of the times.

[Images: Tim Healey/TTAC, General Motors]

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122 Comments on “Speculation Confirmed: Kiss the Buick Regal Goodbye...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Well GM I voted with my dollars, I’ll take those elsewhere in the future.

    So long and thanks for all the fish.

    • 0 avatar
      NoID

      I would vote with my dollars if ANY manufacturer saw fit to offer a three-row MPV or wagon. For now I soldier on with my well-worn Mazda 5.

      Yes, I know the M-B E-series wagon is a thing that exists, and given unlimited funds I’d drop the cash for an E450 in Lunar Blue with the chrome exterior accents. But I’m not quite at that level of affluence yet.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “E450 in Lunar Blue”

        $70,530 https://www.benzelbusch.com/inventory/mercedes-benz/e-450-4matic-sedan-2019-lunar-blue-metallic–19-60

        It’s good to have goals

        • 0 avatar
          NoID

          I absolutely love the “maritime” look of the new Mercs in Lunar Blue with chrome accents and white interior. I’d have a hard time spending 70 large on any vehicle, but you’d have to twist my arm considerably less on this one.

      • 0 avatar
        dima

        I did it. A few months back I purchased last model year of Ford Grand C Max Since Mazda 5 in no longer for sale here.

        • 0 avatar
          NoID

          I was very disappointed a few years back when both the BMW 2-Series Grand Tourer and Chevrolet Orlando failed to make it into the USA. The Orlando was an even bigger tease, since it did make it into Canada. I saw one at a gas pump in mid-Michigan the other day and let out a small whimper of anguish.

          • 0 avatar
            scott25

            You didn’t miss much with an Orlando. Very few are still running here. And both the Mazda5 and Rondo outlived it

        • 0 avatar
          ktm

          I just sold my Mazda 5 and picked up a used 2019 Odyssey. The Odyssey is just a Mazda 5 but a little bit bigger. It has very short turning radius, sporty intentions, but much larger and the same fuel economy.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      They’ve struggled to move 15,000 Regals (in total) per year over the past three years, and if 10% of those were TourX models I’ll eat my hat.

      They’re not a charity, if nobody’s buying something they’re not obligated to incinerate money keeping it on offer. Telling them you’ll “take your dollars elsewhere in the future” isn’t going to change anything, they already knew that.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @JimZ – according to GM Authority roughly 40% of sales have been wagons. Do you prefer ketchup, ranch, or gravy on your hat?

        The “take my dollars elsewhere” comment was directed at people who lament the loss of certain vehicles.

        “Too bad they don’t make a car like the Chevy SS anymore.” – Really did you buy one?

        “Too bad I can’t get a new Lincoln Town Car.” – Really, did you buy one?

        “I wish small trucks were still sized like an S-10.” – Really, did you buy one?

        If not then STFU.

        • 0 avatar
          iNeon

          Therapy helps.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          ““Too bad I can’t get a new Lincoln Town Car.” – Really, did you buy one?”

          ““I wish small trucks were still sized like an S-10.” – Really, did you buy one?”

          Not to be pedantic, but retail sales for Townie were discontinued in MY07 and MY04 for S-10, at least half of the regular posters here were most likely not buying any new vehicles in the mid-00s and therefore didn’t have the opportunity. FTR I would have bought an MY04 spec 4.3 4×4 S-10 in 2018 had it been available and just ate the gas difference.

          Per Motor Trend, MSRP for the 4×4 with the 4.3 was $24,660 which works out to be $33,595 in 2019 and we all know GM puts incentives on every truck then and now. So we’re talking maybe 30K for a true small truck with a reliable but gas guzzling motor? Sign me up, and I know I wouldn’t be the only one.

          https://www.motortrend.com/cars/chevrolet/s10/2004/

          https://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            OK to be a bit pedantic myself, Ranger sales continued through MY12 and the point would have been the same.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m Gen X and the earliest I made enough salary after student stealing, rent, and living expenses to have made a car payment would have been 2008 (plus as you probably know I was in wholesale around that time so buying anything new really would have not made sense anyway).

            Most of the current under 35 crowd would have barely made your MY11 cutoff and many of them were saddled with heavy debts coming out of school. Not to mention the average age of a new car buyer in 2019 is 53, even if it was a bit less in 2011 a sizeable percentage of the commentariat weren’t buying at the time due to inability.

            https://hedgescompany.com/blog/2019/01/new-car-buyer-demographics-2019/

            I would also argue the 4.0 Ranger < 4.3 S-10 and it really isn't the same exact thing, but m'eh I've got work to finish for the day.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            IIRC the short run of MY12 vehicles were strictly fulfilling fleet orders. i.e. they were probably all white regular cab 4-cylinders.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            Anecdotal of course and possibly biased by some outspoken commenters here but it seems to me the wishful small truck market is majority retired or near retired guys pining for the trucks of their youth.

            Perhaps that would be different in a more favorable financial climate for younger folks or with actual small options available, but I’m 35 and no one in my group of friends or co-workers has ever expressed to me a desire for a smaller truck, apart from Gladiator (for non size related reasons). Lot of 1/2 ton and HD drivers though.

            I suppose we shall see when the Santa Fe goes on sale.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @JimZ

            I think you’re right, I recall the last dealer offering was MY11 as a friend purchased an ext-cab/4×4/V6 in 2010.

            @Jack

            I’m a bit older and as I stated I would be all over an S-10, even if someone could cobble together something like the S-10 footprint/drivetrain I’d be a buyer next time around. I do like Tacoma but feel its too big.

            I wonder if Elon put out an S-10 sized Tesla pickup how it would do?

          • 0 avatar
            scott25

            @Jack I’m 29, and literally every person I know around my age who drives has owned, owns, or aspires to own a Ranger or similar sized small truck. They make the most sense out of almost any vehicle for childless rural millenials

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @Scott,

            Again anecdotal, but I work with tons in that crowd at my job and they’re virtually all in half tons or 3/4 diesels. Age of the truck being proportional to salary of course. A few of the older guys are hanging on to old Rangers or have bought new midsizers.

            The small footprint of a Ranger is basically irrelevant in rural areas in my experience.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “I work with tons in that crowd at my job and they’re virtually all in half tons or 3/4 diesels.”

            Are you a roughneck or something?

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @ajla,

            No, but I thought of going into that field once upon a time.

            I commute “the wrong way” from the exurbs into the country to work in what amounts to a company town. 1000 employees at a manufacturing plant in a town of 2000.

        • 0 avatar
          indi500fan

          I’ve got a 20 year old S10. It really is a nice size. Not sure I’ll ever replace it, we’ll just “age out” together.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          Dan, I’m with you and I’m to blame as well. I like all forms of the current Regal, but didn’t buy one. I did sit in the TourX and couldn’t get comfortable in the seat. It was too narrow/I’m too wide type of problem.

          I’ve seen exactly zero Regal GS Sportbacks here in LA. There are over 4 million people here and no Regal GS Sportbacks at any dealers within 150 miles.

          Not having the car at any dealer doesn’t help sell the car. Buick dealers also suck in general, so that doesn’t help either.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            My tiny Buick dealer probably sold 2 or 3 GS per year that the previous generation regal was on sale (2012? to 2017) but has been allocated ZERO current gen GS models.

            Funnily enough the only Buick poster hanging in my salesman’s cubicle was of a 2018 Regal GS.

        • 0 avatar
          Oberkanone

          Chevy SS – yep
          Lincoln Town Car – nope I do have a Continental Mark VII LSC in storage
          S-10 – yep, purchased multiple of these

          STFU PrincipalDan

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        The Regal sold more than twice as many Lexua GS’s last year too!

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’m kinda hoping you leased your Buick, Dan.

      Still a nice and underrated car, tho, even if it didn’t find much love in the market. Frankly, I’m amazed they sold *any* – I can’t even recall seeing an ad for the TourX or Regal. Almost like they wanted them to fail. Hmmmm…

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Nope I bought it. Most fortunate that Buick has a longer warranty (both bumper to bumper and powertrain) than GMC or Chevy. I’ll likely have it paid off by the time the warranty is up. I buy under my budget just for life’s little curveballs like this.

        Life is too short to drive boring cars, I could care less about resale.

        My next car will be interesting and entertaining as well.

        I’m not surprised by this development, just disappointed.

        “GM never fails to disappoint” – GM motto since at least the time of the long UAW strike in 1970.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        Kind of the same thing with the Saturn Astra. I saw one I think. They’d do those pseudo-Saturn dealership commercials and show every Saturn but the Astra. Saw the rear bumper once.

        I have seen exactly one Buick TourX – on the highway. Liked what I saw. I’d go look at one if we were currently car shopping. Lots of GM products come and go between the ten plus years we tend to keep a vehicle.

        GM products seldom last long. I’d also consider a Chevy Bolt but by the time we buy our next second car in three years or so, the Bolt might not exist either except as a used car with an unknown level of factory support. I don’t buy “dead” products and keep them a decade.

    • 0 avatar
      1500cc

      I also voted with my dollars. I’m not too concerned about the greasy bits since they’re standard GM, but body parts might become an issue at some point (they already are in some cases).

      I don’t regret my decision though. It was between a Regal GS and a Stinger GT (I wanted a liftback sedan), and while the Stinger would have been more fun, I think it would be a less trustworthy car to own over the long haul.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Looking forward for all the heart-felt eulogies from folks with no material interest in this thing.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      or all of those people who were excoriating GM years ago for wasting money on unpopular models and are now excoriating GM for cancelling unpopular/unprofitable models.

      A fronte praecipitium, a tergo lupi.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        From what I remember, much like the Alpha platform the Insignia rebadge was an Old GM project too far along to cancel. The original intention was to sell it as a Saturn but with Saturn shuttered they switched it to Buick.

        • 0 avatar

          I bet it would’ve become a 9-3 or 9-5 also.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Read the news of the Regal’s death this morning before I left for work. I head down the street and what do I see?

            A Catera parked on the curb. Never been there before. Another failed Opel importation experiment.

          • 0 avatar

            I like both versions of the Catera, and it was one of the very first cars to employ LED rear blinkers.

            But that interior, woof.

            They should’ve known not to bring any more Opels over after that one.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That must be the only Gen 1 Catera for miles and miles.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I just need to see a Saturn 200 parked in my neighborhood to make things even more complete. Bonus points for the wagon version.

          • 0 avatar
            WallMeerkat

            The last 9-5 was based on the previous gen Regal/Insignia.

            Rumour has it that the planned next-gen 9-3 convertible, before GM sold them off, became the Cascada. Certainly the last 9-3 was based on the Vectra, the predeccessor to the Regal/Insignia.

            Under NEVS though it was hugely unlikely they would have access to GM IP.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Well that was quick…

    This Monday I saw a TourX in metallic dark brown and it was a handsome vehicle. But apparently everyone wants a crossover (except me).

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      I have little interest in any sedan but I’d still like to own a car rather than a second AWD/4WD/crossover.

      That means a hatchback or wagon. Few domestics to choose from in 2019.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    R.I.P. to the most American of automotive forms, the Buick sedan. The last true Buick left us after 2008 (the Lucerne with the 3800 motor), and now the Opel clones (Regal and LaCrosse). All in the name of slow, overweight, tippy station wagons.
    The world I knowed is gone.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      The world we all knew is gone.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Foley

      Mike, great observation re: 3800 = last true Buick. A friend had a 2004 Regal GS (supercharged 3800) and what a great car that was. Tons of torque, great seats, great ride, near-Toyota reliability. It never broke down, but he sold it with 175k miles on it because it was starting to rust.

      I never understood why GM put the 3400 in their minivans/Aztek/Rendezvous instead of the 3800 and 3800SC. Buyers would have appreciated the extra torque and intake manifold gaskets that didn’t leak.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        There was likely a $100 savings per unit, and so it went.

      • 0 avatar
        1500cc

        @ Matt Foley

        I believe it was a size issue, at least for the 2nd gen minivans (dustbusters were available with the 3800). The 3800 has a 90° block, which made it wider than the 60° 3400.

        Note that the 3800 also had its share of intake gasket issues.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “Note that the 3800 also had its share of intake gasket issues.”

          Blasphemer!

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Issues largely caused by Dexcool…

            GM giveth and GM taketh away.

          • 0 avatar

            That 04 Century Regal was hilarious in its expense over the standard model, and build quality and rust resistance.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Well, I have a old Buick with the 3800 with 139,000 miles, and the ONLY drivetrain problem I’ve had was the head gasket.

            That adds up $800 in engine repairs for an old car I’ve had for almost 10 years now.

            Not so bad.

            (I do think I’m coming up on needing a new power steering pump, tho…)

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “was the head gasket.”

            Unless it was extremely overheated at some point it was almost certainly the intake gaskets and not the HG. Head gaskets are generally stout on every version of the sideways Buick V6 but LIM issues do occur on the SeriesII. And the preLN3 versions (so before ’88) have some problems with timing sprocket longevity.

            Other than that though the engines hold up quite well and can be a blessing for people going through a tough time financially. I tend to consider the LN3 and 3300 versions as the best of the bunch.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Amen

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      The LaCrosse was never an Opel clone. It was built on the E2XX platform which was the successor Epsilon II. It shared it roots with the Chevy Impala and Cadillac XTS

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      “All in the name of slow, overweight, tippy station wagons”. I can’t say I agree. Crossovers, especially compact ones and offer easier ingress/egress, greater interior and cargo volume than any compact or in some cases mid-size car, usually with a smaller footprint. I for one am glad the “longer, lower, wider” mantra that started in the late ’50’s is over. The mpg penalty has become minimal, and frankly, very few people car how a car handles.

  • avatar
    NoID

    *Palpatine voice* Everything is progressing as I have foreseen.

    Step 1: Opel sold to PSA
    Step 2: Regal discontinued in NAFTA
    Step 3: FCA merges with PSA
    Step 4: Opel Insignia re-badged as Dodge or Chrysler and sold in NAFTA
    Step 5: Profit (optional)

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      Somewhere around Step 4

      Step 3a: Next gen Opel/Vauxhall Insignia hastily released based on Peugeot 508 (see latest 208-based Corsa)

      I actually think the 508 would make a fine Dodge, especially with the 3 strake rear lights.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I won’t pour one out for the Opel rebadge, but I will for Buick.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Buick may live on as a Chinese car company long after the Chinese take over Google and Apple.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        They might as well just have three Divisions at GM North America: Chevy, Cadillac, GMC. Distribute the Bruick xUVs amongst GMC or cull one or the other on the same platform. (Not that I really care, but I honestly cannot remember which Buick and GMC and Chevy xUVs share the same platform except for the obvious ’Hoe/Yukon/Sub.)

  • avatar
    Thomas Kreutzer

    I thought these were good looking sedans but the US market has spoken and the majority of Americans aren’t interested. It’s a pity.

    The only thing that I think could bring regular cars back to the masses would be a huge spike in gas prices but the window on that happening is closing. If prices were to spike in the next couple of years, people at the bottom of the market would step down to cars as the value proposition, but people at the top would just step more quickly from fossil fueled SUVs to hybrids and EVs.

    If fuel prices spike 10 years out, the used car lots are likely to be filled with hybrids and EVs and there may even be some lower cost options on the new car lots as well. People will be able to have their cake and eat it too. No one will need to step down to anything.

    I don’t like it, of course, but I get it. The people of the future want higher and bigger.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      >>The people of the future want higher and bigger.

      True.

      You know I love driving my Mustang but in a street filled with crossovers and trucks, seeing around them and getting a better feel for the road conditions ahead is an issue. “Why is everyone braking?”

      • 0 avatar
        Thomas Kreutzer

        In my experience it’s really a visibility issue. When I drive my wife’s Note, which I actually really like, it feels like I’m flying down the trench on the death star. You are totally enclosed by the vehicles around you.

        And like Dividebytube says above, there is no looking through the windows of the vehicle ahead and you can’t see what’s coming at you. That’s a huge issue. It’s disconcerting to say the least.

        As for entry of ingress and egress, I think most of the larger cars do a good job at that. When I test drove a couple of Impalas I didn’t notice any squatting down to get in and felt like I was comfortably seated (and not on the floor) when I was behind the wheel. Most large sedans, I think, are pretty comfortable.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @Thomas – and when I’m in my 67 Mustang I’m at eye height with the NISSAN badge on the hatch of your Versa.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          I’ve had no issues with the lower seat in my 2019 Accord versus my 2013, even though that’s been b!tched about all over! Even getting into a CR-V or the like feels like a step up, even though I’m 5’11”, 190 pounds! (I think I’d need a ladder to get into any contemporary HD pickup if I had to drive one each day!)

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      I don’t care about bigger, but I will say everyone else owning a CUV and daylight savings time remind me why I’m considering some sort of small crossover for my next car. Between the ride height, everyone’s insistence on the projector beam/HID/LED headlights and tailgaters I spend half my evening commute adjusting in my seat to avoid the headlight glare from one of the rear facing mirrors. It’s really painful to own a short car nowadays.

      I figured the Regal would live on with the next refresh of the Malibu, as something built in KC. Alas, GM’s refusal to lose money on cars we like the idea of but don’t buy unless heavily discounted continues.

      • 0 avatar
        dividebytube

        Odd question: is this need for higher vehicles driven by an older crowd (easier entry/exit), or by the popularity of pickups? The latter being a sort of arms race (or height in this case). Or is it the actual utility of the vehicle – could be! Owning a sedan and a coupe I do miss having a hatchback.

        • 0 avatar
          WildcatMatt

          “is this need for higher vehicles driven by an older crowd (easier entry/exit), or by the popularity of pickups?”

          Why not both?

          Dad was 6′ with bad knees from playing football in college and playing catcher in an amateur baseball league after that.

          Mom is 5′ and likes the taller ride height, but after her recent stroke has found “climbing in” to be less fun than it used to be.

          I predict that sometime over the next 10 years we will reach peak CUV and “long and low” will stage a comeback. Aren’t the the business coupe and the pillarless hardtop pretty much the only body styles that have truly died and not staged a comeback?

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        CUVs have a whole arsenal of tools to block the view of anyone behind them, and ride height’s just one of them. No one mentions the dark-tinted windows. Why does a freakin’ CR-V need blackout windows – is Anna Wintour riding in back? Beats me. But this much is sure: with blackout windows, any chance of anything that’s not bigger seeing around it is completely gone. The only solution? Why, sir, I can show you a Pilot. It only costs ten grand more.

        I hand it to automakers…they’ve got the art of selling us stuff we don’t need down pat.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Any car without a trunk needs blackout windows. Otherwise Democrats can window shop your car’s contents. Cars with lots of glass also need blackout windows so their tiny A/C compressors using coolant chosen for patent-protection instead of efficiency can keep up with their cooling needs. In other words, if we were a nation of people who took care of themselves and didn’t try to control other people’s lives, we wouldn’t need tinted windows. Electing progressives reduces standards of living in a million different ways.

          • 0 avatar
            iNeon

            Todd– I like what you’re selling. Where can I learn more?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Try Twitter.

            #TrollWhoCan’tHandleBeingIgnored

          • 0 avatar
            210delray

            Come on CJ, not all of society’s problems are the fault of leftists.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            ” if we were a nation of people who took care of themselves and didn’t try to control other people’s lives,”

            this is most often said by people who are only too happy to file into a building on Sunday mornings and let a man with a book and a robe tell them how to live their lives.

            (which they’ll just ignore anyway)

          • 0 avatar
            joeaverage

            I’m pretty sure it is the FoxNews enthusiasts (and Sunday morn crew) telling all of us how to live our lives and who we can love.

            I very much encourage FN/Sunday morn goers to switch channels more often and get out and meet people beyond their fellow Republicans.

            Might discover that the world is a better place than the current people making the most noise.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          One of the reasons I won’t follow the rest of the herd to some sort of xUV is the visibility issue: it’d be just my luck that I’d be changing lanes in my CR-V or Pilot, the blind-spot thing is broken, and the light outside is just right that the Miata or motorcycle to my right gets lost in the glare of the rest of the headlights in the passenger mirror, and isn’t visible via a shoulder-check because of height or the window tint!

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @Robotdawn – next big question – RIP Malibu? Will Cadillac be the ONLY GM division with a sedan?

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          They might as well pull a Ford and get it over with!

        • 0 avatar
          Robotdawn

          I would assume they would keep making the Malibu as long as there is capacity in KC for it. But I also would have assumed there would be capacity for: Cadillac XT4, Buick XT4-like crossover, Buick Regal and Malibu.
          I would guess if that Buick XT4 clone (rumored) volume kicks up enough to keep KC busy, they might just drop Malibu. Think about it, they sell 5,000 POS Chinese made Envisions a month. How many XT4-alike’s do you think Buick could sell? 10k a month?
          But heck, I still don’t understand why GM didn’t just keep the Cruze, but import just enough of them to keep them out of the 20% sale price bin. That’s what the Japanese are doing, lowering the volume of imports rather than discontinuing them. Lordstown had to go though.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Here’s a fact that shows how hopeless Americans are for CUVs.

            Evision 2018 – 40,000 sales

            Regal 2018 – 14,000 sales

            Makes me strongly dislike the average new car buyer.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Dan

            Now you’ve joined the Dark Side as I have.

            Feel the hate flow through you.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    That barely-audible, unmistakably somber melody?

    Its the world’s smallest violin.

    No one cared about this car- the only people that did (or do) are the people that are going to be paying higher insurance and service costs because they bought for a discount.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    I know it was a hope against hope but I wish the desire for sedans remained. The only little glimmer of hope I see now is that IF “regular” cars become popular again, GM could bring some of those designs back from China without too much effort.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    I read something like 60% of “Buick”s sold in the US are Encores, which is an old Opel design built in Korea.

    Buick is essentially dead in NA. It’s a grab bag brand of undistinguished commerce.

  • avatar
    210delray

    Somewhere in a long abandoned junkyard, a 1956 Roadmaster gently weeps…

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Our local GMC/Buick dealer has their service department located in the old dealership/showroom. The dealer is celebrating their 100th anniversary in 2019. They’ve filled the old showroom with classics from their time in business.

      I should go hug the early 50s Roadmaster Straight 8 Dynaflow sitting there.

      (But it says – “Don’t Touch.”)

      • 0 avatar
        210delray

        Wow, when Buicks were Buicks! Little known fact: Buick was #3 in sales in the mid-50s, behind Chevy and Ford. If you look at period photos showing street scenes from say around 1958 or so, you’ll almost invariably find at least one Buick in the picture.

  • avatar
    phreshone

    If Chrysler had any balls, it would return the platform to the US with a Bro’d up Dodge version of the Tour X, and use the liftback as a new Chrysler mid-sized sedan

    Maybe even bring back the Jeep Eagle…

    – will the 3.6 Pentastar drop in??? with Twin Turbos?

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I want the Peugeot 508 wagon as a new Magnum.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      I like the way you think. a modern Eagle would go right up in Subaru’s business.

      • 0 avatar
        scott25

        Only if it had wood paneling. That’s the only thing Outback buyers want but can’t have.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          I want woodgrain on the inside. The piano black on my console is driving me nuts.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Market research (re: piano black console): Would you want woodgrain or actual wood? If real wood, wood veneer or solid wood? Any particular species? What would it be worth to you?

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I would happily accept the fake stuff to the point where I’ve searched for “wood grain kits” but I doubt my installation skills are high enough to pull it off.

            But remember that I was born in 1977 and my father was a member of the Brougham Society, so my taste should no way be interpreted as representing the American Public.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            What do you dislike about the piano black? If it is the gloss level [fingerprints?], let it be noted that when Yamaha wants to produce a “Satin Ebony” piano, they start with a “Polished Ebony” finish and then do some hand scuffing [I would start with gray or red Scotch-Brite; remove the part from the vehicle first].

            If you want a plastic film, you could try DI-NOC. (Not sure, but you could possibly coat it with spray polyurethane [in your choice of gloss levels] when finished.) I’m told that judicious application of heat helps with the curves/corners.

            Real wood veneers are widely available – the concern would be getting adequate adhesion.

            Between 3D scanners and CNC routers, someone could potentially develop a nice business producing solid wood finishers like this (the genuine wood interior trim on my W123 was surprisingly thick).

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @ToolGuy – 2 issues

            Yes fingerprints, I carry a microfiber cloth in the console to periodically wipe away fingerprints and although it works great on the touchscreen, the piano black practically has to be scrubbed.

            The other issue is that the ONLY place in the car with piano black is the console. Around the radio and on the doors (around the door handles) is a faux carbon fiber looking trim.

            I hate the mismatch. Given that the car is Roija Red a nice cherry wood or mahogany would work in the interior. Anything light would look weird.

          • 0 avatar
            syncro87

            @PrincipalDan:

            You can probably wrap that plastic trim you find annoying cheaply. You probably have a shop that does hydrographics in your area. I’ve seen it called different things…hydrographics, water transfer printing, hydro dipping, depending on who you talk to.

            Check it out on YouTube. You can have plastic parts dipped and hence wrapped in pretty much any pattern or design you want. Woodgrain, carbon fiber, The Simpsons, whatever. Take your offending trim off, have it dipped to the finish you desire. Probably wouldn’t cost much.

    • 0 avatar
      Greg Hamilton

      Fiat/Chrysler does has very little to work with, and they have shown in the past they do have quite a bit of ingenuity. If the tooling is already paid for why not a Dodge Tour X? Sounds good to me.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    I would have been more inclined to purchase a Regal or TourX if

    a. Salesman would have been willing to negotiate
    b. Had ventilated seats
    c. had a more upscale interior for the asking price ( see a ).
    d. More inventory to choose from.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    It was a far plastic slab door, slit window cry from great immortal Buick mid-sized Legends such as the 1970 GS 455 Stage 1, the beautiful Colonnades of 1973-77 and, of course the legendary 1986-87 Grand National. Sad to see it join the Riviera, LeSabre, Electra 225, Centurion, Skyhawk, and Skylark in the great U.S. auto graveyard. The US will carry on tall, literally.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Glad I got my neighbor’s low mileage and like new 2012 Buick Lacrosse last October. I will be driving that car for at least 10 years. As for Buick and GM they are going to do what they are going to do regardless of what I decide to buy and that can be said for Ford and FCA as well. Most likely my next vehicle will be electric and hopefully self-driving which is one reason I bought the Lacrosse and plan on keeping it. I don’t feel so brand loyal that I have to buy a specific brand nor do I feel loyal to buy just American owned brands.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Superdessucke–I had a 73 Chevelle Colonnade, a 77 Monte Carlo with rally wheels and swivel buckets, and my mother-in-laws 78 Regal 2 door with a V-8 and landau top all good cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Beautiful sir. Those Colonnades were truly a joy to behold. Automotive art. The pinnacle was the ’76-77 Cutlass Supreme. I think that was the best selling car in the U.S. during that time period if I am not mistaken.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    I had a car. I wanted to buy another one. I did buy another one. The old car had a manual transmission. I wanted the new car to have a manual transmission. I bought one with a manual transmission

    As a 39 year long Ford owner, I would have bought a Ford. But Ford abandoned what I wanted. So, being a man of integrity, I bought from Hyundai which fit my budget, had the transmission I wanted in the size CAR I wanted.

    This is a snide remark aimed at those hypocrites condemning people who say they want something but might not have bought that something.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      My comment was directed at those who lament the loss of things like station wagons and then go buy a generic CUV blob.

      You wanted a manual, bought a manual – when the manual was gone – you did not buy.

      I will always buy what fits my needs at the time I am purchasing and have very little manufacturer loyalty myself.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Yes there are a number of those hypocrites and it is best to ignore them and buy what you like and fits your needs. Those people remind me of a store I went to once where I wanted to buy a freezer and was told by the salesman that the deliveries were only on Tuesday and to take it or leave it. I went to another store and bought a freezer with the choice of day that I wanted. The first store went out of business in a few years. I don’t expect every manufacturer to make the exact vehicle that I want but then I should not be expected to buy a vehicle from a manufacturer that no longer makes what I want. Its a free market and the manufacturer is free to make whatever they want and the buyer is free to buy what they want.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Well there you go. The last GM I was considering after my 2017 Impala gets to a certain age and mileage will now be gone which makes both Buick and GM dead to me! Looks like a Kia or Hyundai will be in my future.

    The Regal would have sold better if GM actually gave a crap about it, marketed it correctly, packaged it better and actually had product sitting on dealer lots. It was one of GM’s best kept secrets but as usual these days piss poor management and decisions rule the day!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Ah Buick I once knew you as a maker of premium cars that once challenged all premium cars that were above you. At one time you made cars that were the envy of your competitors and that people actually aspired to. You were a leader and at one time you were the 3rd best selling brand in the USA. Now most of your cars are gone and those not yet gone are going with a selection of crossovers one being made in China and the other in South Korea. Your latest vehicle is a turbo I3 with a CVT which has all the aspiration of a generic soda which has gone flat. You will sell these and they will keep you going for a while but eventually you will be forgotten and end up in the scrap heap of once great but forgotten brands.

  • avatar
    CobraJet

    It is sad. My wife and I just finished a 1400 mile trip in our 2017 Lacrosse. The car is comfortable, quiet and powerful. I hope to keep it a long time since there apparently won’t be any more like it. We have a crew cab pickup and a van but have never owned a CUV. I’ve driven many rental CUVs but really don’t want one.

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