By on December 3, 2019

ford

Plenty of digital ink has been spilled on the new Mustang Mach-E, from Ford’s decision of saddling it with a pony car name to questions around who’s going to buy the thing. Just over two weeks since its introduction, we at least have an answer to the latter.

The gearheads at The Detroit News ran a story this morning about the Mach-E’s ability to pull new customers into Ford showrooms, citing a conversation they had with suits at San Tan Ford outside of Phoenix. Your author decided to go one step further, calling up what’s touted as the #1 Ford dealer in the world to see if the findings were a one-off anomaly.

They aren’t.

Galpin Ford has its fingers in just about every Blue Oval pie, from Roush to Shelby to teaming up with Henrik Fisker (yes, that Fisker) to create the 725hp Galpin Rocket Mustang. Your author is partial to this RTR Ranger.

But back to the Mach-E. With a starting MSRP of $43,895 and reservations commanding a mere $500, getting in line for the ElectroStang is easy. We spoke with Ruben Correa, a veteran of the sales staff at Galpin with a dozen years of moving Dearborn metal under his belt. As it turns out, his store is experiencing the same type of traffic on Mach-E as the dealer cited in the The Detroit News article.

“About half of the people asking about Mustang Mach-E are new to Ford,” said Correa. “They’re definitely interested in a full-electric powertrain, plus the design of the vehicle.” Galpin has been fielding plenty of calls and have taken deposits on the model. They’ve even added a Reserve Yours button to the header of their website, such is demand.

Correa addressed the elephant in the room — namely Ford’s choice to put the Mustang name on an all-electric crossover. “Skepticism exists in some people,” he said “But the 0-60 times are impressive.” The man has a point; something that can scamper to 60mph in the mid-three second range is no slouch in the performance arena.

Back in Arizona, the owner and GM of San Tan Ford said to DN that about two of every three Mach-E reservations are from people with whom he’s never done business. This, and the news from Galpin, bodes well for Ford. Any company likes new customers, after all, but coming off reports that many former Fiesta and Focus customers are not transitioning to EcoSport (surprise, surprise) and instead seeking their compact car fit elsewhere, this has to feel like a win for the Blue Oval.

This reservation system has another bonus: it gives Ford a heads up as to the parts of this country in which the Mach-E is most popular before the thing even hits the ground. Company spox figure production will be limited to around 50,000 units in the first year, thanks to constraints on battery supply. That number is nothing to sneeze at, especially if the majority of them are sold to brand-new customers.

[Images: Ford Motor Co.]

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56 Comments on “Mustang Mach-E Drawing New Customers to Ford Showrooms...”


  • avatar
    Fred

    Well people are putting deposits on that Cybertruck the rest of us are just grandpas.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’d be curious to see some official data on the original number of Model 3 reservations vs first year sales.

      According to the link below, 23% were refunded by June 2018 and the second link claimed there were 450K in May of 2018.

      146,055 units were delivered in CY 2018 according to Wiki, so rounding down to 146K, 32.4% of the original 450K were delivered in 2018.

      I predict a higher number of the truck will be refunded quickly simply because of the smaller amount of money involved, and if Tesla is lucky they should hit 30-35% of deliveries in the first full year.

      Maybe Ford will… shock… us? :)

      I’m extremely skeptical.

      https://electrek.co/2018/06/04/tesla-model-3-reservations-refunded-report/

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Model_3

      https://cleantechnica.com/2018/05/13/tesla-got-burned-by-model-3-reservations-no-semi-repeat-tesla-bankwuptcy-explained-part-1/

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    I’d believe it. A good friend, exclusively Japanese or Euro buyer, is highly interested. He just wants to wait a year after production starts for Ford to work out the usual launch jitters.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’m sure all fourteen of them are excited.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Its generated a lot of buzz for sure… but will these deposits turn into sales? I know people who paid for their place in the C8 line as well. One of them has already bailed when he claimed the dealer wasn’t communicating enough to him. Thus I bet plenty of the people that signed up where just caught up in the wave of excitement. Once their significant other sees $500 gone from the checking account for an SUV that you can’t even drive yet the dealer will be getting another visitor.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Did anyone doubt these would sell? I certainly didn’t. The issue was never that no one would buy them, it was that Ford took the easy way to sell them by calling them Mustang.
    I’m sure one day in the not too distant future Mustang will simply be trim level to replace ST on warmed up versions of all their crossovers and trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Ford has certainly sullied the Mustang brand before (Mustang II, a FWD car that became the Probe), but they seem to be putting in the effort to make the Mach E a “real” Mustang. The acceleration is there, the styling is there, will the handling be? I do wish the interior was more Mustang and less Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I have to disagree that Ford sullied the name. I think Ford’s decision to extend the Mustang brand to include a four door performance model was brilliant. Keep in mind the majority of Mustangs sold for the past 55 years have been the small engine option. So really we’re just talking about Mustang as being a 2 or 3 door model with certain styling cues. That they adapted those cues to a 4 door model makes no difference to me. People have been clamoring for a four door model for years.

      Should down the road the pony car go away, well the market will dictate that. I don’t think the Mach E is a threat to the 2 door.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “Should down the road the pony car go away, well the market will dictate that.”

        I don’t think the future of 2-door Mustang is as completely dire as some commenters are making it out to be.
        While I don’t expect we’ll party like it’s 1966 ever again I do believe that even during Utility-Mania it can do ~110K volume. Either the Challenger or Camaro are probably both gone in the next 5 years (maybe both), which will give the Mustang a bit of wind and Ford looks to be moving the car off its unique platform/parts with the next gen which should help margins.

        The 2-door Mustang is for Ford as the minivan is to ChryslerCo.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          Recently I completed the owner’s survey for my 2018 Challenger GT.
          I mentioned to them that they should improve upon the existing platform by offering a hybrid electric or a new version based on the Giorgio platform.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Did anyone doubt these would sell? I certainly didn’t.”

      How many do you think they will sell over the first two years?
      I honestly don’t know how it will do. It is a CUV and it has the Mustang badges but right now everything with a plug that isn’t the Model 3 sells in low numbers. Sometimes extremely low numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        My prediction: they’ll sell about 15k-20k annually at the announced prices, with the possibility for more if the price drops.

        Compare with a sales rate of ~70k annually and falling for the conventional Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          That’s a very reasonable prediction, I was going to say 10-15K. I suppose it depends on how much margin there really is in the model, if sales don’t meet expectations there will be room to maneuver but if build costs really are high I doubt Ford will like taking a bath on them just to move more volume.

          Additional: I will be very interested to see if Tesla ever gets itself into CPO. I think they could slaughter this before it gets off the ground if they got into Model X CPO programs for the right money. I was speculating based on valuations, would potential buyers be swayed by an under 50K Model X for $75K all in (they were pulling about 60 in MY17 last I checked)?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            My wife, the Oracle of Regular People Car Preferences, saw a white Model X and said yesterday:

            “That Tesla, what is it? It’s uglier than the others.”

            I think that’s the reason it hasn’t been a gangbusters seller like the Model 3 even in this area that is absolutely awash in money.

            I think the Mach E is far more attractive than the Model X, even if you try to drag down Model X pricing to a somewhat comparable level. (I also think the Model Y is more attractive than the Model X and is going to further cannibalize big brother.)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Good points, thanks for sharing. In my CPO speculation, my thought process was more Tesla product vs non-Tesla product. I’d compare it to MacBook vs non-Macbook, there are a healthy percentage of buyers who will choose the MacBook every time despite all of the issues MacBooks have had over the years.

            I agree the Y is going to cannibalize X, but since S and X share the same dated platform I don’t think its as much of an issue than it would have been a few years ago. Tesla may prefer Y to eat into sales as it prepares the replacement platform for S/X, and it revamps X as being something very different than Y (or drop it altogether).

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Ford has do good in the EV marketplace i seems! After the terrible looking Escape, they seem to finally found their niche!

  • avatar
    Hummer

    “ two of every three Mach-E reservations are from people with whom he’s never done business”

    Isn’t this typical of all of Fords business? I don’t see many people buying Fords only to replace them with another one, it doesn’t take long to learn from that painful lesson.

    • 0 avatar

      You proposal is a pure fantasy. People buy multiple Fords in their life time. As an example I am on my 4th Ford in last 20 years.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      According to the J.D. Power 2019 U.S. Automotive Brand Loyalty Study, Ford U.S. brand repurchase loyalty is at 54.0% (Lincoln is 35.5%). [Some customers may switch from Ford to Lincoln or vice versa and my understanding is those customers would not be included in the figures above.]

      https://www.jdpower.com/business/press-releases/2019-us-automotive-brand-loyalty-study

      [Quote of the year which I ran across while looking into this: “The purpose of any company should be to make people’s lives better. Otherwise, it shouldn’t exist.” – William Clay Ford Jr., Executive Chairman]

  • avatar
    TimK

    Turbo 4-cylinder engines are the ass-cancer of the automobile industry. Nobody in their right mind wants a sluggish vehicle with built-in failure modes. I can see many EVs sold to people who want a bit of performance without the headaches that turbos bring, and the response to the Mach-E bears witness to this.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I hate 2.0Ts but turbos themselves are better and more reliable than they’ve ever been. This complaint is a red herring

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        I like how people like him act like modern GTDI engines are no different than a 1984 Chrysler 2.2 turbo with lag you could measure with a stopwatch.

      • 0 avatar
        Robotdawn

        I have had multiple 2.0T engines and love them. Nothing like getting good acceleration and power plus 30 MPG if you mind your manners. Is it a V8? No. But nowadays finding a car with a V8 is a chore. Finding a V8 in the class of cars I like? Unpossible. A NA V6 is better power but not a ton, but either you pay for that at the pump or you have a CVT.

        I know several car companies have had issues with turbos in their past, but that’s been quite some time.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “the response to the Mach-E bears witness to this.”

      This remains to be seen. Based on some data I sourced, Tesla only delivered 146,055 Model 3 units in 2018 but had 450K reservations as of May of that year. This works out to be roughly 32.4% delivered and Tesla currently owns the EV market going into 2020. Can Ford do better?

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        since you’re good with numbers, do you know how many unfilled reservations still exist for the Model 3?

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I couldn’t find a link in 2019 which had Model 3 reservations in it, but then I found this.

          “That changed heading into the second half of 2018. Tesla stopped taking reservations in the US. Instead, it allowed direct orders to come in in an effort to move more of the higher-priced versions of the Model 3 that the company has been making. This flipped the script: the company is now making a lot of the more expensive Model 3s, so it needs to keep finding buyers in the short term, which is why it’s turning to Europe and China.

          If Tesla can get the $35,000 Model 3 into production, there is likely more demand waiting, as Musk said. But it’s unclear how many of those 450,000 reservation holders remain. Tesla said last October that “less than 20 percent” of reservations holders have asked for a refund, but it hasn’t provided an updated number.”

          https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/15/18213953/teslas-moder-3-new-costumers-europe-china

          in my post above I found a link that said 23% of original reservation holders had cancelled up to May 2018, the fact Tesla said less than 20% as of Oct implies to me less than 20% of what was left in October 2018. So in other words since the word go they lost 23% (May 18) plus up to 19% more in cancellations (through Oct 18). Tesla delivered 146K units in 2018 so my guess is the remaining reservation holders are being fulfilled in 2019 into 2020 and I imagine since Oct 2018 more have cancelled but probably not too many. The fact Tesla has been mum on this leads me to believe the numbers are not so boastful, perhaps of the original 450K they’ve had up to 50% or more total cancellations through Oct 19?

  • avatar

    how many put deposits down on the SSR?

    • 0 avatar

      What is SSR? Or did you mean USSR?

      • 0 avatar
        EGSE

        I’m guessing he meant the truck-like Chevrolet SSR. I’ve seen a few close-up and they look more like a cartoon vehicle than a truck.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The Chevy SSR was a truck convertible thing created to give the Reatta Craft Centre something to build after the Eldo and Cavalier Convertible went out in 2002. I believe it closed in 2006 with the SSR being its final model.

        From what I remember, the Reatta Craft Centre was created specifically to build the Buick Reatta essentially as a gift to UAW. After so much seniority you could transfer there and coast into retirement, or something to that effect. When the Reatta was discontinued, GM kept having to find work for it to do. Incidentally, the EV1 was produced there.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lansing_Craft_Center

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      If you’re going to think up a “cautionary tale” I think Ford’s own ’02-’05 Thunderbird is probably the best example.
      Use of a historic name, chasing after successful competition (in this case Tesla takes the place of Mini/Beetle/PT), early hype & accolades (30K first year sales- many with huge markups, movie/luxury brand tie-ins, Motor Trend COTY award).

      Of course it all fell apart quite abruptly for the final gen T-bird. Partly because Ford only used 75% of their a$$ making it, partly from dealer shenanigans and partly because the retro design trend fizzled out quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        The Thunderbird failed partly because people had unrealistic expectations. Somehow, people got it in their heads that the Thunderbird was a “performance” car and decried the fact that the ’03 wasn’t all that fast.

        Nevermind that the original Thunderbird was not fast, nor were the land barges it turned into in the ’70s.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Buickman,

      Chevrolet SSR is unfair comparison – because Rick Wagoner drove the Chevrolet SSR in the Woodward Dream Cruise – three times! (concept, preproduction, and his personal production vehicle)

      https://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1001793_2000-dream-cruise-day-two

      https://www.motortrend.com/news/2004-chevrolet-ssr/

      https://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1005131_03-dream-cruise-short-circuited [scroll down on this one – it’s worth it]

      It is possible that no other vehicle in history has ever been given this kind of positive exposure. And yes I am completely kidding. :-)

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    It seems like I am usually in lock step with those who think something new or whatever won’t sell well; so many are obvious.

    I think Ford might be on to something here with the Mach E. The styling is not atrocious, the range is usable, the price point is on the mark especially when one considers they can dump the gas pump and have and AWD CUV.

    Obviously all the usual **ifs** are present; if it is reliable, if the range is what is claimed, so and so forth.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    The Flex did all of that back in 2009.

    All this probs is people love to gawk at car crashes. People want to see what vehicle is ruining the Mustang name.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    They’re going to need those new customers since they alienated a lot of the older ones, as well as small car and sedan buyers. I’ll be pulling for them. Anything to keep their fingers off my tax dollars in 5 years!

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Who knows? Maybe in 50 years we will have a movie called “Ford v. Tesla,” which depicts, via attractive actors and much drama, how this ugly bastardized thing brought down Tesla. Only instead of the race track, the scene will be Suburban shopping malls and the drivers will be Baby Boomers with bad knees. We’ll see!

  • avatar
    teddyc73

    I’m just hoping for a day we don’t debate this car’s name. Get over it.

  • avatar
    Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

    I’d be curious to see the actual totals from Ford’s reservation system, but of course even that could be gamed in an attempt to drum up interest in a new model. I definitely wouldn’t trust the word of two dealerships at face value.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    I can assure you that this former Ford owner of 39 years will not set foot in a Ford dealership again even if they were giving away cars for free. The company chickened out and sold itself to the devil (a bald headed one) and I want nothing to do with this. If and when I go electric, it will be from Hyundai.

    I get why they pimped out their Mustang. What else do they have of any value to pimp?

  • avatar
    namstrap

    I don’t remember a FWD Mustang II. A girl I knew had a black one back then, RWD, and I think it was based on a Pinto platform. Could be wrong there. The Probe was designed by Mazda for Ford and based on a 626 coupe. I remember at the time Ford wanted a lower cowl, and Mazda had to put bulges on the hood to clear the strut towers.

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