By on December 4, 2019

high speed car. Shutterstock user Pozdeyev Vitaly

I had forgotten all about coast-to-coast Cannonball Runs. Erwin “Cannon Ball” Baker was the first, of course, going from the East Coast to the West Coast in 53.5 hours in 1933, driving a Graham-Paige Model 57 Blue Streak 8.

The late Brock Yates, of Car and Driver fame, got it down to 32 hours, 51 minutes in 1971, and the 30-hour mark fell to Dave Black and Ed Bolian in 2013 (28 hours, 50 minutes).

Now, Arne Toman and Doug Tabutt have shaved over an hour off that time. With the help of spotter Berkeley Chadwick, they motored from Manhattan’s Red Ball Garage to the Portofino Hotel in Redondo Beach, California, in 27 hours and 25 minutes.

They did it driving a 2015 Mercedes-Benz E63 AMG that had been specially prepped for the run. They stopped for fuel for just 22 minutes total (!) and averaged 103 mph for the 2,825 miles.

Yes, you read that right. Averaged 103 mph. It doesn’t take much imagination to guess what speeds they got up to.

The all-wheel-drive Benz was tuned up to make 700 horsepower, and vinyl tape was used to cover the carbon-fiber trim and the taillights.

A coast-to-coast high-speed dash is not to be undertaken without a defense against law enforcement, so the crew used two radar detectors, laser jamming, and a ground-based version of aircraft collision-avoidance. That last was useful for detecting airborne cops. A remote-controlled thermal scope was used to pick up the heat signatures of any cops who lurked in the grass after dark, and in a modern touch, Waze was used to mark checkpoints. There were also three GPS units (mostly used to prove that the time was accurate), a CB radio, a police scanner, and a kill switch for the brake and taillights.

Not only that, but 18 people served as lookouts for cops and hazards along the route.

There were challenges, beyond the obvious. While the thermal scope was good for spotting deer, it had to come off during the day to keep the car from attracting too much attention (and it could get stuck in one direction, thanks to the force of the wind).

The car also experienced detonation in Colorado, thanks to low-octane gas and high altitude, but a restart solved that problem. The police scanner only worked on cops who hadn’t upgraded to encrypted digital communication systems.

The trio reported no near misses regarding accidents, but they did get close to being popped by the cops in the Midwest while traveling at 120 mph. Instant-on radar lit them up, but a cop setting up a speed trap missed them, and the cruiser that hit them apparently needed fuel.

It should go without saying that attempting this kind of record is highly illegal, highly dangerous, and quite costly financially. We’re not taking a side on whether these guys are automotive legends or stupid fools – but it regardless of how you feel about such runs, under 28 hours to cross the lower 48 from coast to coast is mind-boggling.

UPDATE: Bark asked why I didn’t mention Alex Roy and his crew in the story. I didn’t because Roy’s record was set quite some time ago, but Bark pointed out that Roy’s run did reignite modern interest in the Cannonball Run. Bark is right about that — and as a reminder, Roy and Dave Maher did it in 31 hours and 4 minutes in 2006.

Road and Track has the whole story.

[Image: Shutterstock user Pozdeyev Vitaly]

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76 Comments on “Cannonball Run Record Shattered. Related: the Cannonball Run Is Still a Thing [UPDATED]...”


  • avatar
    dividebytube

    It must have been more difficult in the days of carbs and “55 stay alive”.

    And yes, highly illegal, stupid, and dangerous to do this, but hurrah! for having the gall these days of security everything. Needless to say I don’t recommend doing this. I rarely go over 75 on the highway since, as a I get older, my need for high speed has decreased. I do like hard acceleration but once I’m up to the speed limit, I just cruise.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Also I wouldn’t be surprised if they get ticketed someway somehow using the GPS data against them? We’ll see.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I find this totally lame. What did they prove? What did they do that was truly ‘new’? How does this improve any motoring experience?

    If you are going to try a dangerous stunt then think of something new. Something that might have a useful application.

    Or complete a Top Gear style race that is filmed and entertaining.

    Hopefully nobody else will give them any publicity.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      Yep. Totally lame bro. Lets make a list of stuff that isn’t new, made no contributions to the motoring experience and resulted in no useful applications:

      Nascar
      Nastruck
      Circle Track
      Formula One
      Indy
      Baja 1000
      Baja 500
      Mint 400

      I digress.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        At least this is “Run What Ya Brung” – NASCAR is about as interesting as firing up your favorite video game console and just doing it yourself.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Jon, All under controlled conditions. None breaking any laws. None endangering any citizens that were not willingly participating. Most using new modifications or testing new technologies.

        None of which apply to the lame ‘cannonball’ copiests.

        Your comparison is therefore not logically applicable.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I dunno, Arthur – ever driven the route they did? It’s largely made up of deserted Interstates, and I’m sure that when they hit built-up areas, they had to slow down for traffic. On a wide-open highway, if you’re driving a well maintained car, there isn’t all that much safety risk in putting the hammer down. Heck, I did a trip from Denver to St. Louis in a Buick Encore last year and routinely did 95 through Kansas. I’m by no means a reckless driver.

          It’s illegal, of course, but was there really there some risk of impending death? Meh.

          • 0 avatar

            In general I agree with you about the safety of opening it up on an empty Interstate when there’s no traffic to speak of. Still, there is a huge difference between 95 mph and 125 mph. When you start getting well into triple digits, when overtaking cars going a normal speed, it’s almost like they are traveling in the opposite direction. Things like expansion strips start getting very noticeable. Also, things like braking distances etc start changing exponentially.

            When I reviewed the McLaren 570S for TTAC, I was on my way home from doing a late night grocery run just to say I got groceries in a McLaren, after midnight on a suburban Detroit interstate. It was about 12:15 AM. I was doing my usual 90th percentile 79 mph in the left lane when a squadron of midnight fliers came up to me. I first noticed a Subaru STI, then a guy in a Hellcat Charger pulled up next to me, started pacing me and gave me the traditional nod meaning “Wanna go?”

            Both cars have the same 204mph top speed, but at a standing start the McLaren will kill the Hellcat because of power to weight ratio and once you get into aero territory the Mopar is a brick, but at ~80 mph it’s almost a fair competition. So I nodded back and nailed it. I won’t say the McLaren was walking away, but it was pulling ahead when I decided that even though it was late, traffic was too heavy to be doing a buck twenty four and I backed off and he rocketed past me.

            Not that I would do it, but if I was contemplating a Cannonball run, I’d do it something like what the Brits call a Q Car. Ordinary looking sedan with serious performance hardware, perhaps an Accord or Camry.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Ronnie

            An Avalon TRD would be somewhat invisible for a high speed run.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            They aren’t that empty. Two miles between cars seems absolutely deserted when you’re keeping pace with them but it’s another homicidal pass every 90 seconds when you’re running 160 in a 80.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “Two miles between cars seems absolutely deserted when you’re keeping pace with them but it’s another homicidal pass every 90 seconds when you’re running 160 in a 80.”

            Meh. If those cars are two miles apart then they should both be in the right lane. If they’re in the left lane in a deserted 80 zone then I’d make the hyperbolic counter-argument that they are suicidal.

            See how that works? ;)

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            At 193 mph on pockmarked U.S. highways, there is no guarantee that the passing car can or will stay in the left lane.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            Just to echo the closing speed thing. I track a C7 ‘Vette and when a GT3 RS 911 passes me its like I’m standing still. The difference between 120 and 70 is 50 MPH. Think about that, its a massive difference in speed. Your pretty much always in someone’s blind spot because nobody considers a car that far back could possible be alongside them in the blink of an eye. In .02 seconds you’ve covered an entire football field.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “In .02 seconds you’ve covered an entire football field.”

            … if you’re going 10,000mph.

            Just what kind of mods have you done to your C7 Vette? That thing got a flux capacitor? Dilithium crystal warp core drive? Nitrous?

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            Sorry typo – time required is :02 not .02, so 2 seconds.

            Thankfully I don’t work for NASA ;)

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            I’ve never driven that route but we once went from Toronto to Tampa with only quick ‘bio breaks’.

            And as a young idiot did my share of ‘street racing’. Until I learned better.

            There is just too much that can go wrong. A pothole, a blown tire, another car in your lane, or someone deciding to pull into your lane, a broken down car, a deer/dog, or even a human deciding to cross the road/highway (yes we once crossed 8 lanes of the 401 to get a piece that came off a car), spilled oil or gravel, road debris, construction. Too many variables.

            I consider these two (won’t publicize their names) to be grandstanding ‘me too’ types. They should have thought of something new/different if they wanted the publicity.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      On some level, I get the civil disobedience aspect of Cannonballing, to try and reinforce the idea that lower highway speeds aren’t necessarily the answer for increased safety instead of better driver training or screening, better roads, and cars that can safely handle the speeds. It was just more relevant in Brock Yates’s day (probably still a little relevant in Ontario though, where you can find yourself in a pack safely moving at speeds within a speedometer’s error of being impounded).

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        I started driving in an era when the speed limit on divided highways in Ontario was 70mph. And you would not get pulled over for doing anything less than 10 mph over the limit.

        And of course there were times when we ‘took our chances’ disregarding that unofficial 80mph limit.

        As new drivers we drove ‘crappy’ cars. Things like air cooled VWs’, old domestics with manual brakes and steering. Often with biased ply mismatched tyres. No seatbelts or headrestraints, or air bags etc.

        So indeed our highways are/were designed for higher speeds. But the congestion and general lack of driving skills that we all regularly experience makes the ‘possible’ safe speeds largely moot.

  • avatar
    Thomas Kreutzer

    When I was young I sometimes gave into the urge to do stupid shit on public roads, but anything I might have done pales in comparison to this highly organized effort to violate the law and risk the safety of others. I just can’t wrap my head around it.

    If reckless driving/racing is a felony, could these people not be charged under laws intended to prosecute organized crime? The evidence is all over the internet.

    I don’t know, maybe old age and fatherhood has sucked some of the carefree joy out of my life. When you have kids, you are always looking for the different ways they can get hurt or worse and trying to nip it in the bud. This whole cannonball thing seems senseless to me.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Pointless and irrelevant.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Yyyyyes! I love this!

    The older I get, the wider I smile for stories like this one.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      (comment edit timed out)

      Repurposing the TCAS like that was simply brilliant. (Did they use a TCAS or did they use an ADS-B feed? Or both? Either way…)

      • 0 avatar
        Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

        I wondered that, too. Both are dependent on an aircraft’s transponder, but TCAS doesn’t transmit identifying information like ADS-B Out does. That said, there are efforts underway to block identifying information (like an N-number that can be traced back to a local PD) transmitted by ADS-B Out.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “We’re not taking a side on whether these guys are automotive legends or stupid fools”

    The few who succeed are legends; the many who fail are Darwin Award candidates and a menace to society.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Impressive undertaking.

    Yes it was endangering the public and they could have spent all that dough helping the poor and downtrodden. But in the modern era of media bedwetting, there’s an appealing American scofflaw aspect to all this.

    What’s amazing to me is avoiding construction delays. They seem to be everywhere.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I LOVE this kind of stuff, but it’s not that impressive, logistically. I’ve done that suicide run in less than 2X the ET in an F-150 supercab 4X4, which should be just as jailable.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Somebody’s gonna get killed trying this sooner or later, and with luck, it’ll just be the idiots behind the wheel.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      This is my take as well. While I love the creative use of technology along with all the planning and skill it takes to pull this off its beyond stupid and reckless.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        While I respectfully disagree with your comment, I would also like to thank you for using the correct homonym “reckless” instead of making a common mistake that many commenters commit in the comment section of automotive articles- that is, using the non-word “wreckless.”

        Thank you, from the bottom of my grammarian heart.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Someone’s gonna get killed anyway. Yeah neither really serve mankind, but who’d rather be killed by somebody’s aunt texting?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    For your listening pleasure:

    youtube.com/watch?v=DqWyI8CTzzA

  • avatar
    Stanley Steamer

    Legends, fools, what’s the difference? Awesome story, I’ve always yearned for this kind of motoring adventure. I recommend Brock Yates’ book Cannonball! the world’s Greatest Outlaw Road Race. It will get you into the spirit.

    I wonder how the Mercedes fared in the LA River :)

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    By the way, the first picture in the R/T article shows the co-pilot wearing a blue lives matter shirt. Like that was gonna stop his buddy from getting written up for 70 over…LOL

  • avatar
    Thomas Kreutzer

    Alas, will my earlier comment ever emerge from the moderation queue? I want to play with the other kids so I have redacted my earlier use of naughty language.

    When I was young I sometimes gave into the urge to do stupid shit on public roads, but anything I might have done pales in comparison to this highly organized effort to violate the law and risk the safety of others. I just can’t wrap my head around it.

    If reckless driving/racing is a felony, could these people not be charged under laws intended to prosecute organized crime? The evidence is all over the internet.

    I don’t know, maybe old age and fatherhood has sucked some of the carefree joy out of my life. When you have kids, you are always looking for the different ways they can get hurt or worse and trying to nip it in the bud. This whole cannonball thing seems senseless to me

  • avatar
    Thomas Kreutzer

    Alas, will my earlier comment ever emerge from the moderation queue? I want to play with the other kids so I have redacted my earlier use of naughty language.

    When I was young I sometimes gave into the urge to do stupid sh!t on public roads, but anything I might have done pales in comparison to this highly organized effort to violate the law and risk the safety of others. I just can’t wrap my head around it.

    If reckless driving/racing is a felony, could these people not be charged under laws intended to prosecute organized crime? The evidence is all over the internet.

    I don’t know, maybe old age and fatherhood has sucked some of the carefree joy out of my life. When you have kids, you are always looking for the different ways they can get hurt or worse and trying to nip it in the bud. This whole cannonball thing seems senseless to me

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    I just wonder how they paid for gas. When I’m making time across the country, sometimes outrun MasterCard and Visa’s willingness to believe I am four hundred miles from where I was earlier.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Good point… maybe they took turns paying or maybe they just told their banks they would be traveling.

      Two fill ups, far apart, isn’t too unusual. I’ve filled up a rental car in one city right before returning it to the airport, got on a plane, then filled up my own car a few hours later driving home from another airport. Three or more fill ups, like lily pads hundreds of miles apart, might flag the credit card fraud gonkulator though.

      This kind of thing happens on trips by private airplane. I remember if the merchant code for car gas pumps is the same or different than the avgas pump at an airport. Also, $500 to gas up a small plane is like as putting $50 in your car.

  • avatar
    WildcatMatt

    What’s interesting to me is that is that in reading this, the part I found myself particularly objecting to was the kill switch for the taillights.

    Ultimately it’s a number that’s impressive for its own sake, but almost meaningless again for its own sake as the run was tightly controlled with a robust support staff. It bears very little resemblance to how the original record was achieved.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      I would give honorable mention to the Atlanta Olympics bomber, the Charlottesville Charger driver, and the Oklahoma City bomber. Radical extremists do what they do no matter which end of the political spectrum they think they’re standing up for.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      At the speeds they were going, I don’t think anybody would be running into them from behind because they did not see taillights.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    A$shats should be thrown in jail.

    I drive on these same highways with my kids. If one of these jagoffs plowed into the back of my Highlander at 193 mph (the top speed recorded on their GPS), my kids would most likely die.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon

      Your kids would likely die if aunt sally hit the family vehicle while trying to figure out the Bluetooth thingy on the highway in her new CUV. And there are way more aunt Sally’s out there than 190mph Benz’s.

      • 0 avatar
        mmreeses

        clearly got an A+ in logic.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        No, if aunt Sally bumped me at a normal highway speed, the statistically most likely outcome would be a dent in the side of my car, and the second most likely outcome would be an easily survivable bump into a guardrail or berm.

        By contrast, if a car ran into my car at a closing speed of 120 mph, death for its occupants would be near-certain, and death for all occupants of my car would be pretty likely — but especially those in the back.

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      on the plus side, they’d be dead too! And likely judgment-proof as they probably don’t have insurance that’ll pay out millions of dollars in damages.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      “The GPS says we hit 193 MPH Dad!”

      “That’s nothing to be proud of Russ.”

      Russ walks off.

      “One HUNDRED and NINETY-THREE miles per hour.”

  • avatar
    StudeDude

    Was one of the drivers named Kowalski?

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    **Not only that, but 18 people served as lookouts for cops and hazards along the route.**

    Defeats the whole spirit of the Cannonball Run. Navigating breakdowns, missed turns, tickets, bad weather, bad luck with road closures, etc.

    Any (decent) modern car can run at 100mph for 30 hours.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    “Any (decent) modern car can run at 100mph for 30 hours.”

    That’s true. However for every minute you’re at a stop when trying to average 100 mph, there’s another minute you’d need to drive 200 mph to recover your average. Of course that’s not how you’d actually do it, since 200 mph, well that’d be real craziness.

    Still, taking into account the usual slowdowns, road construction, traffic and so on, my bet is you’d be trying to run 125 or faster when possible. Plus those occasional spikes to, oh, 193 when the opportunity presents itself.

    As for Tim’s comment about using a Q car, they were driving a white Mercedes sedan with some of its more recognizable details taped over. At a quick glance from 100 ft that wouldn’t look much different than a Camry. When Roy and Maher set their record they drove a prepared M5 sedan, pretty much the same idea as the E63 AMG used here. You need a big enough vehicle to carry all the three people (driver, co-driver, spotter) and gear required, and with a trunk that’ll hold a fuel cell large enough to minimize fuel stops. And of course a car with a wicked turn of speed.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    My a$$hat days piloting cars and crotch-rocket bikes ended when I started crewing an ambulance. Comprehending how violent a crash can be and how fragile the occupants are is something you have no frame of reference for until you see it for yourself. Four thousand pounds doing 120 MPH has almost 2 MILLION foot-pounds of kinetic energy, a .50 BMG round is 12,000 to 13,000 at the muzzle. Zipping up what’s left of crash victims into body bags got really f.cking old. Keep the thrill-seeking to a track or a quick sprint on a deserted straight road with good sight distance.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I am of the belief that this type of activity needs to stop. I have not reviewed the material, so I will trust what has been posted here; 193 top speed recorded? What highway in the U.S can accommodate that type of speed?

    The Nascar comparison is ludicrous as all of the driving participants in a Nascar race are aware they are participating in a race. Their were only a few willing participants in this stunt and anyone else who happened to be near them was involved, though they were not given a choice, or even aware of their participation in the first place. Wouldn’t you want to know if some d-bag was on the highway two miles behind you doing 130 with every intention of maintaining that speed for as long as possible? That fact alone would cause me to wait a few minutes before signaling to the left lane to pass whoever in the right lane ahead of me doing 75 when I am doing my usual 81.
    I am going to assume that most of us have laid down 120 on a highway at some point, for me it was about 10 seconds and probably less before I got out of the throttle so as not to come off as some sort of non speed junkie. I love to lay it down in my C6, just not for minutes or hours on end on a public roadway. We do not have an interstate system designed to maintain triple digit speeds for extended periods of time.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    “We do not have an interstate system designed to maintain triple digit speeds for extended periods of time.”

    Actually we do, at least from a purely technical point of view. The interstate highway system was engineered in the 1950s for speeds of 70 mph in the cars of the time. Now fast forward to 21st century cars. I’d argue that much of the interstate system easily supports triple digit speeds in a modern vehicle, with obvious exceptions in some places. But those exceptions apply in both directions, faster and slower. There are long straight-ish sections in the plains and western states where triple digit speeds would be easily maintainable.

    But that’s all purely theoretical once dirty reality intervenes. We are not alone on the roads, and those roads aren’t necessarily in good condition. The idea of a semi doing 65 mph pulling out to pass another at 64, and you’re closing on them at double that, might be a bit concerning. And then there’s driver training and skill levels, and vehicle condition, and, and…

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Perhaps I missed typed…

      We do not have an interstate system that has been maintained to allow for triple digit speeds for extended periods of time.

      I think we are on the same page, way too many variables out there that can not be controlled.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      Having spent some time driving in Germany I have to say that the surfaces of the autobahn are clearly superior.
      The mail over in the states may accommodate such speeds but there’s some places are so damn rough I think control loss at high-speed‘s over here is likely. That Mercedes-Benz must’ve had one heck of a compliant and sophisticated suspension.

      So now every time I drove on I 70 from Denver out to the western Colorado border I’m going to be imagining what kind of speed they were doing on the various stretches bitter curvy steep and/or have really crappy surface quality. The stress just east of grand junction has some places where there’s some what do you do use the car so my tires to leave skidmarks

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        Wow my edit time timed out. I meant to say there are some real dippy sections of I 70 east of Grand Junction that could cause a car at certain speed to go slightly and momentarily airborne.

  • avatar
    CobraJet

    I just finished a trip from Chicago down I65 to Nashville then across I40 to Memphis and home. Just keeping a steady 75 mph is impossible due to truckers, left lane hogs, road construction, etc. Running bursts of 120+ when the left lane is clear would be almost suicidal.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Yes, but what time of the day? The difference between midnight through until about 5~6am is amazing.

      Still, though, I have been caught in a 70 zone, at about 4am and with not another car in sight, behind a trucker going limit-15 up a hill and some yokel in a broken down pickup truck riding next to him and pacing, not passing. Just amazing. Florida panhandle near the Alabama state line, so maybe not so amazing. There should be one day a year when we’re allowed to, never mind what I am wishing for…

      • 0 avatar
        CobraJet

        That time of night I worry about the sleepy or impaired drivers. In Tennessee certain roadwork requiring lane closures is done in the middle of the night. Two workers were killed two weeks ago near Memphis when a semi driver rammed into some construction machinery at 4:00 am. A Tennessee state trooper’s car with blue lights flashing was also hit and totaled, injuring the trooper.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    For me, this represents the tribulations of masculinity put to useless pursuits. Them young mavericks trying to prove themselves – which they did – but I’m hard pressed to think how we’re collectively better because of their achievement. An immense drive by successful men, coupled with a distinct lack of imagination.

  • avatar
    RHD

    “Reckless driving is defined as driving with a willful or wanton disregard for the safety of others, or a willful disregard of the potential consequences of one’s actions. It arises not from mere negligence but often from a conscious decision to expose others to the risk of harm.”

    The fun part of this is that they got away with it.

    The other side of the coin is reality. When a minivan full of children gets injured with a couple of fatalities, the excrement will hit the fan.
    The interstate nature of the “run” puts it into the jurisdiction of the Feds, which means very long prison sentences. All the participants then become part of a criminal conspiracy, again, under Federal laws and punishments.
    One little fender bender, multiplied by the 100+MPH speed of the impact, becomes a sudden and uncontrolled disaster. The civil liabilities for each and every individual involved are enough to ruin their lives (and their family’s, if they have a spouse and kids).

    So… lots of fun to imagine, great fun to watch as a movie, but a colossally stupid thing to do in real life.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    New record! 26:38

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