By on December 9, 2019

2020 Hyundai Sonata

Near the start of this decade, I thought the Hyundai Sonata was perhaps the most attractive mid-size sedan on the market.

I also thought it drove like crap.

The steering was disconnected from the road, it felt slower than its rivals, et cetera.

Hyundai’s next Sonata was better in terms of driving dynamics and on-road behavior, but its styling was conservative to the point of boring. It felt like Hyundai was flailing about, unsure how to build a car that both drove well and looked good, while its rivals were having no problem doing the same. Even its corporate sibling, Kia, was offering up an engaging and handsome Optima.

Enter the 2020 Sonata. It looks good (better from certain angles and with certain colors), but does it drive well? Can it walk and chew gum at the same time?

The answer is: It depends. It depends on what you want from your midsize sedan. Some of you want something sporty, to prove that needing or wanting to own a midsize sedan doesn’t mean you have to give up fun. You’re the parents who don’t go to a fancy dinner when you have a babysitter – you go to the same dive bar you did in your 20s.

Others are looking for comfort. You don’t care if your midsizer is fun to drive, because if you wanted that, you’d shop in another segment. You want sensible shoes.

Then there are those who want the Goldilocks treatment. You want sensibility and practicality and all that stuff, but you occasionally want to attack an on-ramp when you’ve had an extra shot of espresso. Just to remind yourself that you’re not as boring as the guy next to you in bumper-to-bumper.

What, then, is this new Sonata? Stylish yet sensible footwear.

2020 Hyundai Sonata

(Full disclosure: Hyundai flew me to Scottsdale, Arizona, and fed and housed me, so that I could drive the Sonata. The company offered sunglasses that I did not take).

When thinking of cars the new Sonata reminds me of, I kept thinking not of the competition but of a dead-car walking in the large-sedan segment – the Chevrolet Impala.

Lest you think I took a wrong turn at Albuquerque and started sampling Walter White’s product, this comparison is limited. The Sonata is not like the Impala in most ways, of course. But like the Impala, it felt all-day comfortable, while still being relatively engaging to drive, if not sporty.

Hyundai wanted us journalists to highlight the car’s styling, especially some of the more interesting details, and some of the car’s tech grades. And I’ll get there. That said, how a car drives is more important to most buyers, methinks, than remote-control low-speed maneuvering or raked headlights or a digital key.

2020 Hyundai Sonata

On the road, the Limited I drove with the 1.6-liter turbo engine (available in the SEL Plus and Limited trims; 180 horsepower and 195 lb-ft of torque) simply felt smooth and generated little wind/road/tire noise. Sure, the roads around Scottsdale are smooth (a world without potholes? Be still my heart), so perhaps the deck was a bit stacked. That doesn’t change the fact that this car is so quiet that gassy passengers will be outed as he/she who dealt it if the driver has the stereo on mute. If you must pass gas in a Sonata that’s not playing any sonatas over the stereo, make it be silent but deadly.

Goose the gas, and the engine does start making noise in the mid-range, but it’s pleasant enough. This engine has what Hyundai says is the world’s first application of continuously variable valve duration – the duration of valve opening is continuously variable in order to achieve the best fuel economy and performance. The 1.6T gains just two horsepower and keeps the same torque number, despite the compression ratio moving to 10.5:1 over 10.0:1.

Sonata’s ride is nice and smooth. Long-haul families, take note: This thing will be a good friend to road-trippers everywhere. It’s not just about a smooth ride or a quiet aural experience – the seats are comfortable enough for long stints.

2020 Hyundai Sonata

Dynamics aren’t sacrificed at the altar of comfort – the steering feels well-weighted, and a flick into Sport mode livens the car up a little bit. Even when not in Sport mode, the 1.6 gets you moving with enough authority to make merging and passing a breeze.

If you must have true fire-breathing acceleration, Hyundai has a Sonata N Line on deck for some point in the near future. I got a crack at the prototype; check back in a few days for my words on the subject.

Controls are laid out logically, with the HVAC switchgear taking a simplistic approach. Hyundai went for function over form here, and while the look may be a tad boring, it’s appreciated as a driver.

There’s a bit more flair above, thanks to a large center-stack screen. The menus are mostly intuitive to use, and if you need to calm your road rage, you can command the Bose premium audio system to play nature sounds. Road-trippers with small bladders beware: Two of the nature options are water-based.

Longer (both in wheelbase and overall length), lower, and wider than what it replaces, this Sonata has a sloping rear roofline, a full-face grille, and headlights that rake upwards toward the windshield. Rear headroom doesn’t suffer much compared to the previous model, despite the sloping roof – the difference is just 0.2 inches.

I found the look to be handsome overall, although the large grille struck me as over-the-top, and the car looked better in bright colors. It’s a cohesive look that avoids being too outlandish, and it’s easy on the eyes.

2020 Hyundai Sonata

While I drove the 1.6 turbo, the base engine is a 2.5-liter naturally-aspirated four-banger that makes 191 horsepower and 181 lb-ft of torque. Both engines mate to an eight-speed automatic transmission. Available drive modes include normal, sport, custom, and smart (adapts to driver habits to maximize fuel economy and performance).

Like its rivals, Hyundai is offering up a whole bunch of driver-aid tech as standard. The grouping is called Smartsense and includes forward-collision avoidance, smart cruise control with stop and go, lane-follow assist, high-beam assist, driver-attention warning, parking collision-avoidance assist, blind-spot collision-avoidance assist (standard on SEL and up), rear cross-traffic collision-avoidance assist (standard on SEL and up), blind-spot view monitor, and highway drive assist.

The blind-view monitor brings a camera view of your blind spot forth into the gauge cluster each time you flip on the turn signal. It’s a handy feature, especially in urban driving.

I mentioned the digital key earlier. If you have an Android smartphone, you can open the car by placing your phone near the door, and you can even temporarily grant someone else (your kid or spouse, say) access via phone, no matter how far you are from the car. You can also use a near-field communication card to do the same. Hyundai does plan to eventually offer this feature with Apple phones, but couldn’t pin down a time frame.

2020 Hyundai Sonata

Hyundai’s BlueLink app allows users to remotely start the vehicle or to check on vehicle info, and available remote smart parking assist allows users who are standing nearby to remote-control the Sonata, which is useful if you’re trying to maneuver into a tight garage.

Other available tech includes a head-up display, customizable gauge cluster, wireless cell-phone charger.

Four trim levels are available: SE, SEL, SEL Plus, and Limited. The latter two get the 1.6T, and the SEL and SEL Plus offer equipment packages – Convenience and Premium for SEL, and Tech for SEL Plus. Hyundai expects the SEL to be the volume seller.

SEs base at $23,400, while SELs add things like heated front seats, blind-spot collision assist, rear cross-traffic collision assist, satellite radio, and dual-zone climate control. The Convenience Package adds the larger 12.3-inch gauge cluster, the digital key, and wireless charging, among other things, for $1,200. The $1,850 Premium Package requires the Convenience Package and adds leather seats, heated steering wheel, and Bose audio. A panoramic sunroof and LED interior lights are available on their own for a grand.

For $27,450, the SEL Plus adds the 1.6 turbo, 18-inch wheels, most of the Convenience Package goodies, and paddle shifters. The Tech Package gets 10.25-inch navigation screen, panoramic sunroof, LED interior lights, highway driving assist, and Bose audio. To fully load your Sonata, and to get the remote-control feature, you’ll spend $33,300 for a Limited.

2020 Hyundai Sonata

Destination is $930 for all trims, and the car is on sale now.

Fuel economy is listed at 28 mpg city/38 mpg highway/32 mpg combined in the SE, 27/37/31 in the SEL, and 27/36/31 in cars with the 1.6.

This may be an oversimplification, but the hierarchy of mid-size sedans now appears clear. The enthusiast buyer will be shopping Honda or Mazda, the Goldilocks intender Toyota or Kia, and the comfort shopper will be looking at Hyundai, Nissan, and VW (I haven’t driven Subaru’s new Legacy enough to place it).

2020 Hyundai Sonata

Comfort isn’t a pejorative, not in this segment. While some midsize sedan buyers want verve, most just want to get from Point A to Point B with ease, and with little expenditure in fuel or monthly payment. If the car isn’t boring, so much the better.

This is where the Sonata fits in. If you that disappoints you, wait a year or so for the spicier N Line.

Hyundai finally seems to be nailing the dynamics and styling mix, at least if you’re OK with dynamics that don’t quite meet the sport sedan threshold. That’s a recipe for a very good midsize car.

Not great, not bad. Very good. Certainly, one that can walk and chew gum at the same time.

Editor’s Note: A typographical error indicated the 2.5-liter engine made 191 lb-ft of torque. The correct figure is 181 lb-ft. We’ve corrected the information and regret the error.

[Images © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

74 Comments on “2020 Hyundai Sonata First Drive – Comfort First...”


  • avatar
    dal20402

    “That said, how a car drives is more important to most buyers, methinks, than remote-control low-speed maneuvering or raked headlights or a digital key.”

    I don’t have the words to express how wrong I think this is.

    Buyers’ priorities start with styling and then proceed to packaging, feature content, and comfort. Unless you are talking about “enthusiast” segments, driving dynamics are somewhere on the priority list below quality of the embroidery in the floormats.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Even people who claim they care about how a car drives are often doing so while driving something wretched with run-flat tires and EPS calibrated to be so unresponsive as to prevent a high-speed lane change when the driver sneezes. It is to laugh.

      The use of chrome on this car is original in a way that makes it look like a youthful owner is adding Pep-Boys bling as funds allow.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “Even people who claim they care about how a car drives are often doing so while driving something wretched with run-flat tires and EPS calibrated to be so unresponsive as to prevent a high-speed lane change when the driver sneezes.”

        I’d say they’re doing so on factory tires calibrated (a) to be cheap and (b) to last the length of the lease.

        Let’s have some fun. I’ll drive you to the local VW dealer, where you can test drive a GTI for half an hour. Then you’ll get into mine, which is equally bone stock–except for the tires. Drive the same test route.

        I would make tire believers out of anyone who took me up on that. (And in fact, were I to buy a new GTI today I would immediately put good tires on it and throw the factory stuff away. That’s how good that car is when properly shod, and how bad it is when it’s not.)

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Oh come on – the factory Bridgestones on my GTI Sport aren’t that bad. They are not amazing, but they aren’t awful. But I suppose up north they probably stick some dreadful all-season garbage on them. Down here they all have proper summer tires, at least the Sports did.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      You make a good point…but our readers care more than most, for one, and my point was that while drivers might care less about dynamics than styling or features or FE, they probably do care more about it than they do minor features like the digital key or the remote control.

      In other words, even for drivers who don’t care about dynamics as their number one priority, dynamics will still matter more in the purchasing decision than the cool features.

      I could be wrong, but I don’t see buyers caring so much about a digital key that they don’t care at all how the car drives.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Far too many readers even here sing the praises of the jacked up hatch, er, CUV. Which is prima facie evidence that they don’t give a crap about dynamics. Ultimately, there are no cars that are truly terrible to drive anymore, so as long as it meets the low common denominator standard, most people are happy with it.

        It’s all about the tinsel these days.

      • 0 avatar
        The Ghost of Buckshot Jones

        Dude, read the comments. Your readers are concerned most about how many grills they have to steal off of a back patio to afford a down payment on the 1999 2wd regular cab Ranger at the buy-here-pay-here lot down the street from them.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think you’re wrong, dal – even people who aren’t picky about performance can like or dislike how a car drives. The whole car-buying experience is built around that.

      The folks you’re talking about probably do exist, but they’re in a minority.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I agree they often want test drives and do judge “how a car drives,” but I think that is more about a comfortable seating position and things like control effort and smooth ride than it is about anything we’d think of as driving dynamics.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Well, yeah, but things like control efforts, ride comfort, etc are all part of “how a car drives.” I think there are people who literally don’t care about this stuff, but I have to think it’s probably a very small percentage of buyers overall.

        • 0 avatar
          EGSE

          My sister bought a 2010 Elantra after her Civic was T-boned. She asked me to test-drive it and I likened it to a barge. But she could not have cared less, even coming from a Civic. The low price and above average feature content sold her on it. The car has been very reliable, only needed one O2 sensor in 120+k miles. But now she’s eyeing an Accord because…..it handles better and she can get a manual which she misses greatly.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      I also did try to make clear in my review that mid-size buyers don’t necessarily care about dynamics or want a sporty car…but that they do care enough that it matters more than some gee-whiz app feature.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      There’s a big exception to styling being a priority.

      Toyota/Lexus and Honda buyers are apt to overlook styling in favor of reputation for reliability.

      For buyer like them, styling is behind things like reliability, packaging/interior space/comfort, ride quality, safety features and power (which can be a safety factor).

      Among the Japanese brands, Mazda has the best design language across its lineup (some models better than others), but sales success has been limited for Mazda here due to the other factors.

      Meanwhile, Subarus are about as bland as can be and yet, it has been growing by leaps and bounds.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      @dal, I disagree with your disagreement.
      Ride comfort balanced with performance was extremely high on my list of priorities for the purchase of my current car. Of course this came after 6+ years of driving a Kia Soul, Spark EV and a Chevy Volt – the Volt being the most comfortable car to drive.
      Yes, I wanted a lot of features but I was determined to get a car that was #1 comfortable to drive and #2 could easily get out of its own way.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Dad-gum it…Dal beat me to it! I was just copying the same exact sentence. Just take a look at what sells, how they are advertised and a majority of what is reviewed. Driving dynamics take a very distant back seat to tech and even styling these days.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Correct. Tech is likely the leading reason people get a new car these days. Your average car drives just fine. Most vehicles have zero character as they have been dumbed down for the masses. When getting my wife her last car her top requirement was push-button start. Apparently digging keys out of your purse is seriously old school, along with shifting gears yourself!

      When your average person talks about “how a car drives” what they really mean is a) is it quiet? b) is the suspension too stiff or bouncy? c) does it accelerate and brake smoothly? d) does the steering seem lose and sloppy? or heavy and vague? Another clue about this is what people brag about when they get a new car. 90% of my co-workers mentioned things like how clear the Bluetooth is, the speed at which the GPS recalculates or how easy it is to charge their phone. None of them mentioned mid-corner understeer, suspension rebound or torque curves.

      As mentioned if driving dynamics mattered Mazda’s vehicles would out sell pretty much everything. My wife’s best friend hates driving and fully admits it – her last four vehicles: a Honda CR-V, a Toyota Avalon, a Nissan Quest and a Honda Accord. None of which were tuned on the Nurburgring.

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        @JMII You’ve hit the nail on the head. People care about how it “drives”, but they are referring to how it behaves when normal people drive a car for their normal, every-day tasks.

        It’s no bad thing for a car to be specifically designed to excel at those (boring) tasks. A tightly-tuned corner-carver with a twitchy braking system and a manual transmission is sub-optimal to shuttle the kids to soccer practice, or grinding out a daily commute.

        And it’s certainly folly to discount the technology operating properly. Bluetooth call quality is *important* if you have to make calls from the car, as is the ability of the GPS to re-route you properly if you can’t take the suggested route. Those are certainly secondary considerations if you are blasting through the twisties on a fun Sunday afternoon, but they aren’t so frivolous to daily driving tasks.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    The “base” engine is both more powerful and more fuel efficient? Or is that an error in the numbers?

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      It appears a typo on the torque figures slipped through. Fixed.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Torque is not power, so my point stands.

        191 hp to 180 hp, and 28/38 vs 27/36 mpg. All for more money and complexity. What progress.

        • 0 avatar
          conundrum

          Torque and power are directly related by rpm. If you think a vehicle/engine is torquey, all it means is that the engine produces good power at the rpm in question. There’s no argument about it, it’s fact.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Exactly. Modern turbos deliver more torque at lower RPMs, which makes them feel more powerful in everyday driving. The alternative is something like Honda VTEC, which delivered a ton of torque as long as you revved the p*ss out of the motor all the time. Most drivers don’t like doing that.

        • 0 avatar
          PeriSoft

          There’s a big real-world difference between equivalent maximum power w/ peak torque at 1400 vs torque at 4k.

          If you don’t want complexity, why are you suffering EFI, automatic choke, pressurized oiling, hydraulic brakes, and – God forbid – automatic spark advance? They’re all just new-fangled doohickeys that are, as you say, more money, more complexity, and bound to fail, after all.

          • 0 avatar
            R Henry

            “If you don’t want complexity, why are you suffering EFI, automatic choke, pressurized oiling, hydraulic brakes, and – God forbid – automatic spark advance? They’re all just new-fangled doohickeys that are, as you say, more money, more complexity, and bound to fail, after all.”

            Really? Do we really want to snark at each other here, or do we want to enjoy our hobby here as brothers? This isn’t twitter ya’know!

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            Electronic controls made cars simpler. That’s one of the main reasons reliability improved so much since their inception. Most of the modern technology increases complexity and therefore reliability is beginning to go in the other direction.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Torque is a force that can be used to do work. Horsepower is the rate that an engine can accomplish that work. An engine with 200 hp @ 10,504 RPM and peak torque of 100 lb-ft can do the same work as an engine that makes 200 hp and 400 lb-ft at its maximum engine speed of 2,626 RPM. That’s what horsepower measures. All you need is the right selection of transmission ratios.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            Guys, I’m well aware of the relationship between power and torque, and that different engines have different power curves. I’m just saying that Hyundai is asking a lot of its customers to understand all that when they go in and see the upmarket engine offering less power and worse mileage. Maybe they notice it on a test drive, maybe not.

            @Perisoft, that is an asinine comparison. Those features all offer me something for the money and complexity. Paying extra for a smaller engine that offers me less power and worse economy with debatable upside tells me the added complexity is really unnecessary.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @jackx

            It more tells you that Hyundai isn’t that good at engineering… Though peak numbers tell you nothing about how a car feels to drive – especially when comparing small turbos to mid-size n/a engines. That 1.6 probably makes peak torque across a 4000rpm+ range, while the n/a has an actual peak, and likely feels relatively gutless below it. There is no such thing as a free lunch, but a well-engineered turbo comes close. Sadly, a lot of companies seem to not be that good at it.

          • 0 avatar
            PeriSoft

            @jack4x

            “@Perisoft, that is an asinine comparison. Those features all offer me something for the money and complexity.”

            Except if you look at contemporary press, people said *exactly the same things* about all of those things (except maybe pressurized oiling systems). Letters to the editor (the 1960s equivalent of commenting) bemoaned useless frufru like automatic choke to no end, and complained about its deleterious impact on reliability without commensurate gains in convenience. I’m snarky because if you actually go back and look at what people thought about almost any given tech at the time – at least in the car industry – you could swap out the words and the dated slang and the complaints would be indistinguishable decade-to-decade. So I doubt that the current complaints about highly-stressed turbo4s will be any more accurate than previous complaints about highly-stressed V6s, highly-stressed small V8s, super-complicated OHC engines, and so on.

            As for Hyundai asking a lot of its customers to understand the torque curve making for better driveability, I’m with you there: They might lose people right out of the gate who look at the numbers and don’t bother to show up for a test drive. The ones who do may not even notice the numbers, and hopefully their implementation is good enough to make it worthwhile; press reports so far suggest it’s OK. I owned a 2015 Sonata with the NA 2.4 and it really needed to be beaten to get up a head of steam, so I’m optimistic that there will be a significant real-world difference in feel – but I’d definitely like to try the two options in real life to see.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    “If you must pass gas in a Sonata that’s not playing any sonatas over the stereo, make it be silent but deadly.”

    Thanks for that timely advice Healey.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    “the large grille struck me as over-the-top”

    “Gaping maw” is how I would describe it.

    • 0 avatar
      randy in rocklin

      ala Toyota and lexus

    • 0 avatar
      namstrap

      For some reason it reminds me of Darth Vader’s helmet.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        That was my first impression – the front end is terrible. Could someone please explain WHY this has been the trend for the last decade or so? Not only is the gaping maw effect horrible to look it, it’s entirely unnecessary.
        The body shape is almost a Mercedes clone, and the rear end screams “Honda!”.
        Hyundai/Kia are still copycats and followers. Their quality has improved slowly but surely, and their cars are up-to-date in most respects, but the stylists are more copy-and-pasters than artists.
        On the other hand, it’s great to have another choice in the market. Today’s buyers have an embarrassment of riches to choose from. Accidents are no longer an automatic trip to the hospital in an ambulance. Power and economy per cubic inch are the best ever. Interest rates are low.
        And you can get a cut-rate Mercedes/Lexus/Honda clone with cheap parts if it ever happens to need repairs.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    1.6T: 180 horsepower and 195 lb-ft of torque, 27/36/31

    2.5 NA (base engine): 191 horsepower and 191 lb-ft of torque, 27/37/31

    Not sure I see why anybody would want the added complexity of a turbo when it doesn’t appear to provide any advantage.

  • avatar
    Fred

    This car needs a hatch!

    • 0 avatar
      stevelovescars

      Yeah, the trunk opening does look like it would be quite small given the rake of the rear glass.

      I couldn’t help but think of the (soon to be discontinued) Buick Regal, which is a more powerful 5-door hatch for about the same money. It never gets mentioned in comparison tests but I suppose that just means that journalists forget about it as much as potential buyers. It also offered an AWD option but just never really seemed to catch on despite getting some early positive reviews.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Overall, a decent exterior shape, though I find her to be a bit wide in the hips.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Very Lincoln MKZ + Toyota Prius + Lexus Maw

  • avatar
    ajla

    This car has a dishonest face. I don’t like it.

  • avatar
    V16

    The front end design reminds me of a modern, angled take on the unfortunate
    1996 Ford Taurus, “fish mouth grille.”

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Reminds me a lot of the Fusion hybrid we rented. Hope the seats are better. The fuel economy isn’t much worse (we averaged 36 after two weeks) and the Fusion was pretty gutless trying to merge.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    Whoa there Tim…..”*continuously* variable valve duration”?

    Details?

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Why can’t cars look good anymore?
    Just adding more cuts, chrome strips and weird sheet metal angles doesn’t make a good design.

    I know I keep mentioning it, but few cars on sale today match the elegance of my 92 BMW 7 Series.
    If I were in the market for a new car (thankfully I’m not) I’d have a hard time picking one. Designers have lost their way big time.

  • avatar
    gasser

    I hope the seat cushions are a bit longer than in the past. As to the engine, I would like to compare the 0-30 times for the turbo vs. the NA. I thought that the multigear transmissions and CVT were supposed to help even out the turbo low speed torque advantage. I am impressed by the gas mileage. It’s seems almost every mainstream car today will get 35-40 mpg on the highway. What I am more interested in, however, is real world city gas mileage. In daily L.A. traffic, every car we have had in the last 10 years gets about 5-6 mpg LESS in the city than the EPA guesstimate. I have read that this is where the hybrids really shine, not on the freeway. Any opinions out there???

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    This car is unbelievably hideous. I might actually say the worst in its segment.

    Even the steering wheel is ugly.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I think it looks fine, the Sonata has some really break out styling. I like that is not boring and takes risks in what must be the most risk-adverse segment. There are much worse like the Civic.

      That said the steering wheel is making the sad face… because it’s saw itself in the mirror = YUCK!

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I dont think that I’ve ever sat in a Sonata with decent headroom, gimme that anyday over whatever amazing driving dynamics people expect in a FWD family sedan.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I don’t get the engine lineup at all. Why pay more for less. You lose 11 Hp and 2 MPG with the costlier higher trim level cars making it questionable why they even offer the old 1.6T. The only slight advantage is a couple more LBS FT of torque which surely is negated by larger tired Limited models that weight more to boot.

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      You get that torque at 1500 instead of 4000, meaning you do a lot less neck-wringing for an equivalent amount of scoot, and the transmission doesn’t have to drop three gears to do anything.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Any word on when the N-model hits, Tim?

  • avatar
    chiefmonkey

    I question the durability of that front grille. Too much empty space. What’s to prevent sticks and rocks from getting in there?

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    Side view= Fusion
    Rear view= Civic
    Front view= Sad fish

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Side/greenhouse is more like the Azera from a couple of generations ago.

      Only part of the rear like the Civic are part of the taillights (much better done on the Sonata) which Honda lifted from Volvo.

      Yes, too much catfish at the front-end (if were to get the Sonata, likely would opt for the hybrid for the nicer shaped grille).

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    I don’t think the front end totally ruins the look of the Sonata, but it does gives it a down market look as if the product planners got their front clips mixed up. I saw the base SE’s front end which is like the KDM version and I think the touch of chrome bisecting the front gives the Sonata a more elegant look. The KDM front should’ve been used for the SEL and Limited trims while the SE and Sport should’ve gotten the big US droopy fish face.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    For today’s styling trends this car looks good. The styling is not offensive nor is it shocking. I could live with this car

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    Hyundai does know it’s up against a 301 horsepower V6 Camry and a 252 horsepower Accord available with a stick, right?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    A face only a mother could love.

  • avatar

    Stylish? Not in my book. I would rather say hideous especially grill and headlights. I saw that car at SF Auto Show so I pass on it just because how it looks. Since Fusion is not going to be updated it leaves Mazda6 as the only choice for my next car. I still cannot stand SUVs/CUVs. And Camry and Accord are so look so sad inside/out that I wonder how Americans find them attractive.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Americans find Camry and Accord extremely reliable and very appliance like. That is why white, grey, silver, and black are so popular the same colors found in most household appliances.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Maybe don’t wax poetic about the “styling.” We have eyes and can see it. That front end is tragic and cohesive it isn’t. Perhaps this looks good as a newfangled doorstop…

  • avatar
    stuckonthetrain

    These gaping front maws are because of Euro ncap pedestrian safety regs, right?

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • StudeDude: I agree with you regarding the effects dirty coolant might have. Which brings me to ask how an engine with...
  • JMII: I think all these luxury / high end SUVs has increased their overall brand awareness. Before people with money...
  • MorrisGray: I like to buy new cars whether my income is $30k or $60k, but I tend to keep them for a while like the...
  • 1500cc: “quick perusal” is an oxymoron /pedant
  • jkross22: To TTAC censors, I apologize in advance. Hey Debbie, go eff yourself. You and the other street walkers...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States