By on November 22, 2019

Given what Tesla revealed last night, it seemed appropriate to reference a movie from the early ’80s — an era from which the automaker’s “futuristic” Cybertruck appears to have emerged. Looking like a stainless steel pup tent with a delicatessen counter serving as a dash, the Cybertruck’s Thursday night reveal generated a critical mass of hot takes, resulting in an megaton-level explosion of ridicule heard to the farthest reaches of space.

Perhaps even on Mars.

While the term “half baked” appeared to be one of the more popular descriptors for the vehicle (and may be a contributing factor to the vehicle’s design), market analysts are a sober-minded crowd. Friday morning, they let loose.

CNBC has a good rundown of Wall Street’s reaction.

“In a night to be remembered for the Armored Glass fail, Tesla’s Cybertruck reveal will likely disappoint current pickup truck owners and we see the vehicle remaining a niche and not a mainstream product,” wrote Jeffrey Osborne in a note to investors, adding that the entry-level $39,900 version was, like the much-touted $35k Model 3, unlikely to ever see the light of day. The vehicle’s glaring lack of side mirrors and windshield wipers is evidence of a rushed launch, he said.

No mention was made of the tacky seam (weld?) at the apex of the Cybertruck’s triangle.

Emmanuel Rosner of Deutsche Bank wondered whether the pyramid-shaped vehicle was too polarizing, writing “what are the real battery ranges under working conditions, with a payload or while towing? A greatly reduced range would require commercial customers to opt for the higher trims, which could be significantly more expensive than their equivalent traditional pickups.”

He added that having the truck’s supposedly armoured window glass shatter during the reveal was “not a good start.”

Like many others, Bernstein analyst Toni Sacconaghi saw the makings of a niche vehicle in Cybertruck, rather than a serious challenger to high-volume offerings like the Ford F-150 and Ram 1500.

“We suspect Cybertruck will not materially impact Tesla’s financials, or investor sentiment, though its aggressive price raises the question of how healthy gross margins might be,” Sacconaghi wrote.

After gazing at the creation before him, Credit Suisse’s Dan Levy claimed the Model 3 and Model Y will be the company’s breadwinners for the foreseeable future. “We expect Cybertruck to be a lifestyle vehicle; but amid a highly radical design (unlike anything the industry has seen), it’s unclear to us who the core buyer will be,” he wrote.

Jed Dorsheimer of Canaccord Genuity was more bullish on the Cybertruck, claiming the introduction gives Tesla a presence in a segment previously reserved for other players. “The starting price point of $39,900 for the 250-mile-range, single-motor RWD design option was also a strong point as this positions the Cybertruck competitively in the middle of the lucrative truck market,” he wrote. Still, Dorsheimer admitted the design was “polarizing.”

There’s nothing wrong with wild, polarizing styling, as such things keep the world a vibrant and exciting place. But Tesla’s creation inspired more questions than answers. Where will it be built? How is this model going to get off the ground a year after the Model Y, a vehicle whose production is also peppered with questions of capacity? Is rear-seat headroom all that hot? Can the design stay as-is in a world that demands stringent pedestrian safety standards?

We await the answers.

Tesla’s stock sank 5.7 percent in early Friday trading.

[Images: Tesla]

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107 Comments on “The Day After: Market, Analysts React to L.A.-area Explosion (of Disbelief)...”


  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    Wow, that electric Harley sure was a disaster.
    Telsa: Hold my skinny half cap frapp moch choca latta yaya.
    Also Tesla: To the sheet brake . . . !

  • avatar
    RHD

    “Art & Science” has been taken to the next level.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      It seems more reminiscent of the origami styling fad of fifty years ago in Italy that produced a few concept cars, almost none of which reached production. Testing revealed that the resulting aerodynamic drag, lift and wind noise were worse than any benefits from appealing to the esthetic senses of children who read science fiction.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      I thought William Towns had passed away. (He had a way with a straight-edge.)

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Was there no one there to test the window shatter strength… you know… before the public debut?

    Why does this matter to potential buyers? Was there a stampede of fleeing soyboys on the mention of a 9mm?

    • 0 avatar
      RangerM

      They were probably giddy over the thought of being immune to small arms fire, when their truck dies (at half the distance of an F150’s range) in a bad neighborhood.

    • 0 avatar
      tsoden

      Am I the only one wonder how a person would escape the truck if the galss was indeed shatter resistant, a fire breaks out, and the electric doors fail? I would think that “bullet proof side glass would not be something a production car should have.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Making a truck that outperforms everything else on the market would have been a home run. 8 foot bed, extra storage compartments, solar panel tonneau cover, and so on. It could have been unique, but still somewhat similar to Fords and Chevys. A useful truck that would sell in big numbers could pull Tesla out of its financial quicksand.
    Is there marked demand for a 6-seater pickup truck?

    Our friend needs to lay off the wacky tobacky.
    What we have here, ladies and gentlemen, is the AMC Pacer of 2020.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    That front end cries out for a sweeping red Cylon eye.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I think they should have gone (much) more traditional on the truck and saved the radical design for the Roadster.

  • avatar

    I’ve seen better designs from five-year-olds.

    FAIL FAIL FAIL

  • avatar
    Dan

    Defense: The S is stale, sedans are dead, they need a new high end product and this is it. It isn’t a truck at all, it’s an X6. The bed is a styling cue. A Tesla that isn’t tiny and dorky looking is long overdue.

    Rebuttal: WTF are they talking about with 40K, even though that’s a lie like Tesla pricing always is and they actually mean 65. Working class people don’t want this any more than they want an X6 and pretending that it’s affordable to them just breaks the cachet.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I think this is still “dorky” just not in the same way an Encore or Bolt is “dorky”.

    • 0 avatar
      Prado

      I’m with you mostly on the Defense side, although I don’t see any correlation to the X6. This will appeal to rich guys as a 75 to 100k usable toy… much like many lifted trucks. Needs to come in ‘Batman Black’ and other satin finishes.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        I see an X6 in that it’s an image product even by the standards of an image brand. So all of the criticisms as a car are speaking the wrong language. Image customers don’t care if you can use the bed or what it weighs or if it has mirrors yet. They care if it announces rich a-hole.

        The answer is a resounding yes.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      If they sell a single one of these at $40k I’ll convert my Bolt into a brodozer.

      That’s for the larger corporate image of “Tesla is the company that’s going to bring electric cars to everyone!”

      For at least a few years these will be capacity-constrained and somehow it will always be the high-end orders that get fulfilled first. Then there will be a brief window of availability for a decontented version at $45k or $50k, which will eventually be upgraded to have better specs and sell for $60k.

  • avatar
    watersketch

    Stainless steel? Other than the Delorean, has anyone wanted a stainless steel vehicle?

    • 0 avatar
      Imagefont

      Ironically, stainless steel actually stains badly. It also rusts readily in a salt air environment unless it’s a very high grade of stainless, which is very expensive. You’re going to need some Emory cloth and steel wool instead of wax.
      Every single aspect of this abomination is like a bad joke.
      Elon is punking his idiot fans.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        Imagefont, I’m reading 301 stainless in some articles – where would that fall on the corrosion vs. cost scale?

        • 0 avatar
          ToolGuy

          DeLorean was 304. Tesla is being reported as 301.

          Both 301 and 304 are Austenitic, which is the most corrosion-resistant general type of Stainless.

          This article compares 304 with 301 (in the context of sinks):
          https://www.justmfg.com/blog/stainless-steel-type-304.html

          Rookie-level summary:
          – “Type 301 was developed to be a lower-cost alternative to Type 304”
          – “Type 304 has 18% minimum chromium content, this provides corrosion and oxidation resistance and helps to maintain the beautiful luster… With a lower level of chromium, Type 301 is more susceptible to corrosion and oxidation..”
          – “Type 304 with between 8.0 and 10.5% nickel helps it take the abuse in all types of environments. The nickel in Type 301 is between 6.0 and 8.0% giving greater chance for the product to show wear.”
          – 301 has more carbon – “Type 301 has good drawing and forming characteristics”
          – The higher carbon content of 301 makes it more hardenable (by cold working) – this “hardness” was emphasized in the reveal.

          One take on the care and feeding of DeLorean body panels:
          https://www.dmcnews.com/faq/c_body.htm

          Welders/fabricators who work on steel and stainless steel are (or should be) fastidious about using separate grinding wheels/etc. for steel vs. stainless steel – iron particles on stainless panels will ruin your life.

          • 0 avatar
            Guitar man

            The problem with the DMC wasn’t rust, it was sticky-beakers leaving their paw prints all over it.

            Ask anyone with a stainless steel fridge.

        • 0 avatar
          Imagefont

          ToolGuy
          304 stainless is pretty generic. Exhaust systems are made of 304. But 304 rusts readily in a saltwater environment. Just salt air, you don’t need emersion in salt water. Like being within 100 yards of the ocean. Generally 316L is needed to protect from salt air and it costs at least twice as much. I have personal experience in this area.
          Your cars exhaust system is probably made of 304, look under your car and check out the condition of the tubing. Either way it stains very easily and you can’t clean it conventionally, you have to buff it out or sand it out. It would require a lot more care than ordinary paint if you really care about the appearance.

  • avatar
    Acd

    When are they going to show the real truck? This can’t be it.

  • avatar
    readallover

    I am going to sue – they stole my drawing from fourth grade.

  • avatar
    craiger

    I’m neither a fan nor a hater of Musk, or Tesla, or EVs in general.

    To my mind, this intro was a publicity stunt intended to get people talking. Soon, they will follow up with a normal design, and everyone will have a big laugh.

    That’s the most reasonable explanation. Obviously there are other possibilities, all of them bad.

    • 0 avatar
      MeJ

      @craiger
      I was thinking the same thing….This cannot be the real truck. They even had the windows break so people would talk. It’s quite brilliant really.
      However…IF this is the real truck then Tesla is going to sink faster than the Hindenburg.

    • 0 avatar
      Lokki

      The more I think about it, the more I agree with you Craiger. – this is a joke by Musk.

      It’s brilliant if you think about it.

      What does Elon enjoy more than anything (okay almost anything) in the world?
      Burning the Shorts. He will wait a few days to allow them time to buy and then announce the real thing: BURN!!

      The actual truck will psychologically appear better than it is because of the compare and contrast with the joke truck.
      Additionally Elon will get twice the publicity he’d get otherwise, and it’s all free.

      The give-away on the joke is the whole “bulletproof glass” stunt. He set the stage for it with his “stop a “Full Metal Jacket” 9mm bullet gimmick”. It’s a dig at the macho image of the traditional trucks… and would have no marketing value for an actual vehicle.

      The specs are probably real enough, and perhaps the interior.

      Watch this space for a few days, and you’ll see Craiger called it.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    Currently drive a tundra crew cab and I love tithe Tesla.
    Electric vehicles last longer as does stainless. The design is fresh as opposed to the usual pickup where one is the same as the other.

    Big question is what is real range when towing say 5000 lbs. Also you can’t go into a supercharger station when towing.

    Still if the 400 mile truck can do 200 or 259 miles towing I’m in.

    Three things prevent me from daily driving my tundra, gas mileage, it’s. A pain on some roads and I do t best not to rack up miles on it when I dont need a truck.

    The Tesla potentially answers all those questions. It’s fast enough to be entertaining probably steers well as all Tesla’s do , being electric running costs are going to be way way less than gas powered truck and being electric/stainless it’s going to last 300k miles. My only questions are whether it’s real, and real range while towing .

    As to how many they can sell. Ford sells a lot of raptors and that’s hardly a work truck. Plus we know there will be an suv too.

    If it’s real sign me up

    • 0 avatar
      Oberkanone

      Tundra is expected to have a hybrid option when redesign is introduced next year.
      Ford and GM will both introduce electric pickup trucks that are not half baked.

      TESLA pickup design equals a F grade in college design class. It is beyond belief that last nights circus sideshow was allowed to take place. TSLA is down 6% today already.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      ” The design is fresh as opposed to the usual pickup where one is the same as the other.”

      There’s a reason pickups are designed the way they are. This pickup isn’t going to be great at pickuping.

      “Ford sells a lot of raptors and that’s hardly a work truck.”

      But they sell hundreds of thousands of non Raptors to make the Raptor possible.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    I know this man makes more money than my entire net worth in the time it takes him to finish his breakfast cereal but I felt very bad for him yesterday. How embarrassing!! Ouch! I don’t know who actually needs an oddly shaped stainless steel sport coupe CUV with bullet proof glass but I do want him to be successful, and I’m sure the market will embrace this product once the bugs, er steel bearings, are worked out.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    What was that movie from the 80s, Mad Max or something?

  • avatar
    Ol Shel

    SO, after the crash, while it’s in flames, and the door handles have refused to pop out, the unbreakable glass will be smashed by the first responders…HOW?

    (Yes, I saw the glass shatter, but what’s the point of unbreakable glass, unless you’re a paranoid billionaire?)

    This design is proof that 1. Nobody at Tesla is able to stand up to Musk, and 2. Musk has horrible taste.

  • avatar

    “We had to compromise and lose some of the elements from the renderings. For instance, the original wheels were supposed to be square.”

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Giorgetto Giugiaro must be shaking his head somewhere.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    It looks like a few guys took a sheet metal brake and some sheets of stainless steel looked at some 70’s back issues of Road and Track and cobbled together a truck on top of an old chassis in their backyard.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      Actually 70’s Penthouse Magazine:
      https://archive.org/details/penthouse-1978-10/page/n139

      October 1978 to be exact. Designed by Curtis Brubaker. Found that on Jalopnik.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Ah. They also seem to be precient with the pictured rendering of a 3-door multifunctional SUV that looks like a shrunken Lamborghini LM crossed with a Suzuki Jimny and Isuzu Amigo/Rodeo Sport.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    looks like the perfect vehicle for me to pursue Douglas Quaid to Venusville after Cohaagen tears me a new one.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This will sell.

    It pains me to write it but I’m sure this IS the truck and it will sell. It will sell better than anyone thinks.

    TSLA supporters are massively loyal – cult grade loyal. We’ve seen this with other brands and people.

    AAPL could put poop in a box, call it the iDump, and people would have lined up to buy it 5 years ago. They would have raved about how it doesn’t smell like any other poop, and how useful it is. An entire cottage industry around iDump and its benefits would arise.

    Our Dear Leader could literally shoot Hannity on live TV and 34% of active voters would just shrug and go, “I don’t care.”

    Look at everyone suckered into Marie Kowondo and who threw their stuff out, not being told to go buy stuff from her.

    One word.

    Oprah.

    That is where Tesla and Musk is with their supporters. Living here in the land of Tesla my Facebook page was blown up with peeps in my circle screaming, “SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY ELON!”

    This is going to sell.

    It doesn’t mean it is a good truck, practical, or addresses the real issues like what will range be with a 10,000-pound trailer behind it climbing up Snoqualmie Pass on I-90 at 65 MPH in January.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Yep. All of this. The tech bros are going to murder each other to have the first one.

      (Although it’s not like you get good range out of a gas truck towing a 10k trailer up Snoqualmie Pass flat-out. The last time I did something like that the van I was driving got less than 4 mpg, good for around 100 miles of range.)

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        And then you filled it back up while your passenger bought a soda.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          On that occasion there were 14 passengers, and a Tesla could easily have supercharged to 80% in the time it took for all of them to pee and get their sodas.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Fun Puget Sound fact, Cle Elum in Native American for, “stop and pee here.”

            I read it on the Internet, which means it is true.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Won’t “tech bros” still have to park and manuever this thing? It isn’t any smaller than a traditional full-size half-ton crew cab and you’ve remarked before that truck dimensions aren’t great for most urban environments.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Yes, but this gorup of people will deal with bad parking to feel like they’re in Blade Runner and follow Elon at the same time.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            @dal

            And let us add, this demographic can’t park properly anyway. These are the people wedging their Model S into two compact spots outside of Whole Foods. with the wheels also bleeding into the handicapped space.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “TSLA supporters are massively loyal – cult grade loyal. We’ve seen this with other brands and people.”

      well we’ve still yet to see if the market for BEVs is larger than the Elon Musk Fan Club. Tesla’s valuation is based on the expectation of growth, and it’s not going to be “growth” if it’s just Model 3 owners trading up to a Model Y, then to a Cybertruck.

      the Mach-E is probably going to be the first key indicator if there’s a market outside of Tesla fans. It’s the first non-Tesla with usable range that isn’t either a goofy looking pod like the Bolt, a compliance vehicle only sold in CARB states, or a $70k+ luxury piece like the eTron or i-Pace.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      I have no doubt it would sell if it was that price and met that specification.

      That it will do that, or come into being at all, is where I’m doubtful.

    • 0 avatar
      ejwu

      Land of Tesla? Do you mean California? I live in San Jose and non of my friends and colleagues are talking about the Tesla truck. Well maybe except the jokes about the broken glass and how stupid the event was. Many of them are Model S/3 owners.

  • avatar
    mjg82

    I’m imagining the disaster of trailer towers pulling into Tesla Supercharger stations with this thing.

  • avatar
    Yurpean

    I have to admit I was shocked at first and thought this is the crappiest thing ever.

    But the longer I see it the more I like it and then it struck me: This is the Mars truck and it will become iconic and thus represent the future and all traditional truck designs are now starting to look dated and obsolete. Owning this truck will represent the 21st century and driving a traditional truck will make one automatically perceived as backwaterish. I am not saying that people ARE, just that this is how it will be perceived. There will be of course thousands who will stick to traditional trucks out of spite and just out of spite. But I really think this is revolutionary.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Arnold will buy this.

  • avatar
    ronald

    When they reboot Animal House, this thing can be the base of the Deathmobile.

    It looks like some tech bros welded together some sheets of metal.

    Elon has done some good stuff, but he is also a grifter

  • avatar
    USAFMech

    Lamborghini produced the beautiful 350GT, 400Gt, and, of course, the all-time great Miura, for 7 years before dropping the Countach at the 1971 Turin show.

    The Countach has since set the brand benchmark. Lamborghini’s are supposed to be avant-garde design statements more so than just sports cars.

    Tesla, as a startup and a producer of electric vehicles can be far more daring than the industry generally.

    This neo-Thing will have to grow on me, but I’m very much curious how this strategy will play out for them. Will they be Lamborghini? Or is this the Tedsel?

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      Awesome, so Tesla will go bankrupt like Lamborghini did?

      • 0 avatar
        USAFMech

        Ha! Funny twist, right? Ford survived for decades more. Lamborghini went bust and was passed around like a 13-year old partying with Roman Polanski, R Kelly, and Jerry Sandusky.

        In this case (and for probably the first time in history), they’d rather be the Edsel than the Countach.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    1. This has waaay more visual presence than any Hummer ever did.
    2. Musk may well have been inspired by his Burning Man attendance.
    3. I do like that it breaks the blocky box shaped pickup truck genre.
    4. Clearly some creative thought went into this.
    5. At last my 2016 Prius looks reserved and ordinary.
    6. I can’t stop laughing every time I look at the pics.

  • avatar
    Lockstops

    “After gazing at the creation before him, Credit Suisse’s Dan Levy claimed the Model 3 and Model Y will be the company’s breadwinners for the foreseeable future.”

    That’s one way to put it.
    I wonder: could Elon be so smart? Could he have hatched such a cunning plan? Did he tactically put that Cyberturd onto the horizon (note: he doesn’t actually have to make it, in the presented form at least) in order to make the Model S, Y and 3 look good?

    I mean that truck is so hilariously crap that it is the only car in the world that might actually make the other Teslas look good!

  • avatar
    Lockstops

    Someone check: did Elon sell lots of stock just before the presentation?

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Is this body on frame or unibody?
    Either way the stainless makes sense, because the 3 Models (some joke the name comes from Tesla paint being .3 the thickness of normal automotive practice) are rusting like a 72 Vega in Cleveland.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    OK I’m going to go a little OCD on this and then I’m going to go live my life (but it has been fun).

    If you haven’t watched the reveal, I highly encourage you to check it out.

    The *glass* was not promoted as “bulletproof” – the stainless steel in the *body* (3mm 301?) was shown being struck by 9mm rounds – damage but no penetration. A 5.56 (ex. XM855 penetrator) or 7.62 would likely be a different story. One needs to be careful throwing around terms – the Tesla marketing gurus might not be super-familiar with firearms in general (my speculation).

    During the glass drop test (no breakage of the Tesla panel), the well-rehearsed “magic” team smoothly resets the clamps holding the panel after every drop. Hypothesis: This is relieving any ‘set’ or ‘stress’ induced by the last drop. I replaced some very basic single-pane windows lately and did some impromptu ‘testing’ – it is amazing how hard you can hit a regular single-pane window in the center *if* it is evenly supported around the edges (a good-sized ball peen hammer will bounce back with no breakage) and if there is no tiny point of contact to initiate cracking (as in the case of a sharp ceramic spark plug insulator fragment of aluminum oxide thrown at a tempered glass side window).

    Further hypothesis: If the window was not installed in such a way as to be evenly supported all the way around the perimeter (could be likely in a prototype vehicle), it would be more likely to shatter when hit with the ball bearing.

    By the way, those ball bearings were huge, and the mass of course goes up as the cube of the radius (a 1 inch chrome steel ball weighs ~2 oz; 1.5 inch jumps to ~8 oz; 2 inch ~19 oz; 3 inch ~4 pounds; 4 inch ~9.5 pounds).

    One more – hitting a piece of stainless hard with a hammer tends to induce this incredibly unpleasant sensation (not sure why), so my sympathies are with the sledgehammer guy.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      > sledgehammer guy

      Meet Tesla’s chief designer Franz von Holzhausen.

      > those ball bearings were huge, and the mass of course
      > goes up as the cube of the radius

      They were 1 kg.

      I suspect that the glass was either weakened/damaged by the 4 trial throws they did before the show, or by the sledge hammer blows.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    This has to be a joke of some sort. Or a prop for “Back to the Future 5”.

  • avatar
    Fliggin_De_Fluge

    This thing looks like something that killed KITT in 1984. They should have brought in David Hasselhoff to introduce it. I see that we are still recycling crap trends from the 80s and repackaging them as “cool”. To be fair though, this crap could have come from the 70s as well.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @ronald–I was thinking that as well–add a vanity plate that says “Eat Me”. I also thought that Tesla hired the designers of the current Silverado who were moonlighting. Saw on the news that this Tesla truck has set a new standard with breaking glass.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    That thing looks likes something Judge Dredd would’ve traded in for a newer,less ugly model.

  • avatar
    Greg Hamilton

    If Musk did an electrified version of the 1965 Dodge Deora he would have had a hit on his hands. That car looked like it was from the future and still does.

  • avatar
    Fliggin_De_Fluge

    Someone said “revolutionary” when describing this truck. Now, in what way is this revolutionary? The design certainly isnt. If anything this is a retro design. Remember when all the automakers wanted to do the 50s and then the 60s again? Is this different? Sure it is. Is it new? NOPE, not in the slightest. To me this is a big “hay look at me I’m different!” the way EVERYONE wants to be different yet ends up saying the same things, wearing the same clothes, etc-etc-etc. How soon does the novelty wear off?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      “How soon does the novelty wear off?”

      Unfortunately, the answer might be “when almost every new vehicle on the road starts looking like it”. The Chinese will be the first to copy it – that’s a given. Eventually, the other manufacturers might follow. Even cars might get the treatment. I’m not saying it’s definitely going to happen, but this could be the start of a trend. Get ready for it.

      https://www.google.com/search?q=bertone+nuccio+concept+stratos&sxsrf=ACYBGNTlN3ZVki_Z_V8nNva-jOJhRO-wRQ:1574512302491&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiY1e-zq4DmAhWxq1kKHTu6CaUQ_AUoAXoECAsQAw&biw=1700&bih=900

      • 0 avatar
        Greg Hamilton

        And according to this article–
        https://jalopnik.com/the-bertone-lancia-stratos-hf-zero-was-the-baddest-disc-1677249407

        “The inside sported a futuristic instrument panel encased in green glass that reminds me of the inside of a Tesla Model S, just 40 years earlier.”

        Just a coincidence of course.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    The actual truck is surprisingly large and quite “macho”-looking, especially when parked next to a Ford Super-Duty or Chevy Silverado HD.

    Looking forward to seeing one at SEMA, raised and with after-market wheels and tires, mud flaps, a brush-guard with fog and driving lights, a rollover bar with more lights, a diamond plate tool box, diamond plate steps, a gun rack in the back, and a pair of truck nutz hanging from the trailer hitch in the back.

    Being electric it won’t have an exhaust snorkel, though.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Good point about the snorkel, because it reminds me of a thought I had as I read Motor Trend’s self-congratulating and fawning tribute to this artless primitive-looking brute — what happens when water gets in the works, electrical works that is? Will sparks fly as fearless novice offroaders fed up coping with that long wheelbase over short humps resort to running up a creek bed instead? A high voltage motor, power electronics and a giant battery pack hanging off the bottom. You’d have to hope someone checked how well all that can be sealed. Maybe the whole thing would then float if the water was deep enough, and you’d be up the creek without a paddle.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @conundrum: It stays dry. They waterproof it since Tesla sells cars in areas that have been known to get rain on occasion: youtube.com/watch?v=QSR6Y2gNeI0

        “what happens when water gets in the works, electrical works that is?”

        What happens when water gets into the electrical works of gasoline powered cars? They have electronics and depend on electricity to run as well.

  • avatar
    redgolf

    It’s a Super Car – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbZNxyXUBZs

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Part of me wants to know what happens when this vehicle hits the center side of a semi trailer…

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    Well, the future was essentially “designed” over a half-century ago so EM’s going to have a problem designing anything that shocks us and is functionally useable. Tesla’s current vehicles aren’t striking visual standouts, if anything they’re just plain. Calling a bent pyramid a “truck” doesn’t make it a truck. However.. I’m amazed how much debt people will spend on statement vehicles and tech-bros are no different. If EM called a flat sheet, a cube, a cylinder, a ball, or a Rubik’s cube… of stainless, a truck, techbros will buy it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If one is old enough then one only needs to remember the pet rock and the mood ring. Possibly this is just a more expensive fad but possibly I am wrong and this will be the truck that paves the way for all future EV trucks. I am skeptical. Wedge shapes are not exactly a new vehicle design. The Triumph TR7 was wedge shaped just not as extreme as this Tesla truck.

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