By on November 15, 2019

Mach E

Your humble editor made a beeline for In N’ Out Burger upon landing at LAX, as Midwesterners are wont to do, and while I munched on my meal, I discovered via the Twitterverse that the details of the Ford Mustang Mach E, which I am about to see up close tomorrow, were leaked. Spoiled, like a Hollywood movie on Reddit.

Ford flew media out to the Los Angeles Auto Show early so that we could spend time with the Mach E, all for some enterprising forum user to leak the info before showtime.

To be fair, the specs could be inaccurate, or could change. But here’s what hit the Web earlier tonight, thanks to the Mach E Forum.

There are five trim levels: Select ($43,895), Premium ($50,600), California Route 1 ($52,400), First Edition (limited edition, $59,900), and GT ($60,500). Those prices don’t include destination or the federal EV tax credit of $7,500.

Buyers will be able to get rear- or all-wheel drive, and the GT is slated to run 0-60 in the mid-three-second range.

First Editions should have a range of 270 miles, while the GT and Select will be around 230, with the rest being around 300.

Other nuggets include the ability to add 47 miles of range in 10 minutes of charge time and two large interior digital displays, including a center-stack tablet that looks much like what Tesla offers.

Ford’s CoPilot360 2.0 and CoPilot360 Assist 2.0 driver-aid systems appear to be standard.

Check back with us throughout the weekend for more information on Ford’s newest Mustang.

 

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52 Comments on “Mustang Mach E Specs Leaked Ahead of LA Auto Show Reveal...”


  • avatar
    cook_diesel

    I think this is a good first pass at a longer range BEV by Ford. I mostly like the styling but to me the sticker looking pony emblem out front cheapens the Mustang’s rich history. I can easily see this being a sell-out so I’m wondering what kind of production constraints Ford will have initially AND if this will be available nationally.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Sounds pretty sweet. And that grille looks good. [The horse is running backwards, though.]

    (Edit: Saw the rest of the vehicle, including interior. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Elon Musk should be feeling complimented right now.)

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    They’ll sell dozens!

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    $43,895 starting price sounds extremely low for a vehicle with reasonable range. That must be the bait and switch price you’ll never see. I don’t care if they call it a Mustang, Ford once used a Pinto chassis to build a Mustang and nothing can be worse than that. I’m ready to be deeply disappointed.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Tesla sells a similarly speced EV in that price range. No reason to believe Ford or anyone else can’t too.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        What a laughable statement. Tesla is years ahead of the competition.

        Also, it seems competitive today but it’s a moving target.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Of course it is a moving target, but assuming the specs of this vehicle are correct, how is it not competitive with a Model 3? Companies are often ahead of their competition until they aren’t. That may or may not happen here, but just being first into something doesn’t guarantee technical supremacy long term…or did you type your reply on your Altair Computer running CP/M?

          • 0 avatar
            vvk

            My point is that it is easy to say you will build a competitive model but it is an entirely different matter to actually do it in volume. At this point, most Tesla competitors are basically vaporware. Not available at vast majority of stores, not available at any price. And vast majority of dealers don’t want to sell them.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            This is an announced product from Ford that they start taking orders for in 2 days. Ford…not Fisker, not some Chinese start up, not some luxury brand that wants a piece of the model S pie, but the freaking Ford Motor Company. Say what you will about them but odds are this vehicle will go on sale when they say and honestly, even if it launches along the lines of something like the current Explorer that will be smooth sailing compared to the crapshow that was the model 3 launch.

            This vehicle is set to be sold in 50 states. I will be able to roll to my dealer in Huntsville, AL and order it (or online), pick it up and have it serviced. Contrast that with my friend’s model 3. He drove to Nashville to get it and the last time it was serviced a Flatbed hauled it away and returned it 2 months later. If it is wrecked the Body shop locally will work on it and should I desire to wrench on it myself Ford will ship parts to my house like any other Ford…no “authorized service center only” like Tesla.

            It has been my experience any dealer will sell you whatever you want so long as you write the check. No, they may not put a pile of cash on the hood like an F150 during Truck O Rama month or whatever, but then again neither does Tesla.

            And again, with respect to building in volume, come on man…How many F150’s a month does Ford build compared to Tesla’s “volume” model 3?

            Ford has been building cars for over 100 years. They put America on wheels. This is not some excentric dude with chinese money…this is a real car company building a bread and butter product with specs that look eerily similar to the model Y…a vehicle it may very well beat to market. If Tesla doesn’t take this seriously then they are a poorly managed company.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Don’t you get it, Art? nobody should hope to be able to catch up, so they should all just fold and hand the entire industry over to Elon.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            How many more people had Ed McMahon back an armored car full of cash up their door than received a Tesla Model 3 for its advertised price?

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Furthermore, this is a direct model Y competitor, which isn’t on sale yet. It looks like actual deliveries are slated to start around the same time, however Ford does have a real track record for at least launching models on time, unlike Tesla which I’m not sure has ever accomplished that.

          There is a real possibility Ford will beat Tesla to market with both a 4 door crossover and an electrified pickup truck (by far the most important markets in the US) and that those vehicles will be competetive in price and specs to the Tesla vehicles. Furthermore one can actually get parts and get the Ford serviced pretty much everywhere. And Ford can build vehicles in quantities Tesla simply can’t and as such potentially can enjoy economies of scale Tesla can’t…especially on the truck. And what if Ford puts a pile of cash on the hood? Ford can absorb temporary losses for market share should some sort of EV price war erupt…a scenario Tesla has yet to face.

          It may or may not succeed, but this is a level of competition Tesla has yet to face potentially and it will be interesting to see how it pans out. Either way, I think this is where the EV starts to sink or swim as a real production vehicle for the masses and Tesla potentially as a real car company versus a niche maker with little competition to their vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “What a laughable statement. Tesla is years ahead of the competition.”

          Your perception of Tesla vs the competition is what’s laughable.

          They offer nothing that’s not available to other automakers. In a cute PR move they released all their patents and the industry collectively yawned. They offer a largely unique product…because the business model is unprofitable thus far aren’t most companies aren’t keen on losing money.

          The reason we’re seeing Model 3 competitors is because other automakers can’t leave Model 3 volume unchecked. Even if they won’t make money chasing it.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “They offer nothing that’s not available to other automakers. In a cute PR move they released all their patents”

            yeah, there’s a big “gotcha” in their terms. Their pledge basically said you could use their patented inventions and they wouldn’t sue you for infringement *as long as you (other car company) also pledged not to sue Tesla OR ANYONE ELSE for infringement of your own EV-related patents.*

            that’s big. it’s effectively GPL-ing their patents. You can use them, but then you have to open yours up for everyone else too.

            I’m pretty sure they knew no one was going to bite on that. But they get to look like the good guy to people like Fred Lambert.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            @danio3834:

            “They offer nothing that’s not available to other automakers.”

            They have the Supercharger network, the Gigafactories, a huge lead in sales, and the highest efficiency for any vehicle in the US market.

            Until Ford or anyone else has a Gigafactory, they can’t compete on volume, and therefore they have no hope of being profitable.

            After the Mach-E excitement settles down, people will realize it’s limited by not having a Supercharger network to plug into.

            As for efficiency, that translates into range and value. Just look at the real-world ranges of the Jaguar I-Pace and Audi e-Tron.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            The supercharger network does matter, I give you that, BUT aren’t you one of the ones on here that regularly spouts about how most EVs are charged in their garage at night? That won’t change because their is an oval on the front. Ford could install “superchargers” at their dealerships and negate most of that advantage because again, there are Ford dealerships everywhere. Either way, While it is an advantage at the published ranges I don’t see it as a dealbreaker, especially in non-traditional EV markets. There is no Supercharger in my hometown for example, but many Teslas.

            The Gigafactory was important FOR TESLA I believe. Suppliers will build whatever Ford wants them to build because they have a track record of paying their bills. No traditional supplier was going to stand up the capacity to do what Tesla was asking without that track record.

            As to profit, it hasn’t been profitable for Tesla yet and here is where I think Ford has an advantage IF they are serious about this: Ford can build these at a loss to get them on the road. They can do so because up in Dearborn they have a factory that builds F 150’s and prints money.

            I am not certain this will be the approach, they aren’t known for long term thinking of late but they could. And they can put a pile of money on the hood of every one of these in addition to the 7500 dollars Uncle Sam has on it already that the Model Y won’t.

            Another advantage: Ford Motor Credit. They can move these via cheap leases and have an easier time financing them.

            And with respect to Volume, unless Tesla plans on bringing in models to the US from the Shanghai plant (risky given the politics and potential tarriff situation), where is Tesla going to conjure up more volume? They are building the 3 in tents. The battery is one piece…they still have to put the car together somewhere.

            I like Tesla and admire what they have done. But this refrain of “Ford can’t do this as well as Tesla” sounds a whole lot like “Toyota can’t build a luxury car”. This notion that Tesla sits on some unassailable technological perch is idiotic. They have failed to turn a profit in spite of the advantages you cite and have faced no competition to speak of. If this is a maximum effort from Ford (and them putting the little Pony on the front makes me believe it is) and the specs aren’t untrue then this is a real challenge to them. If nothing else it should put pressure on them to do something with the model Y thay have never done…launch it without issue. Again, Ford’s line of recent screw up launches have nothing on Teslas ability to turn a product launch into something akin to a couple of Chimps flinging Dung at each other.

            Nobody has challenged Tesla in the meat of the market before (Bolt and Leaf are at a size people don’t buy in large numbers and everything else has been at the high end). This makes it interesting.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            @Art:

            “aren’t you one of the ones on here that regularly spouts about how most EVs are charged in their garage at night?”

            Yes, I am, but most of the B&B around here drive 500 miles a day and expect 5-minute fillups from an EV. At least the SC network offers the chance to actually drive that far – and more – but the filling speed is subject to technology development.

            As for Ford dealerships – the charger availability at traditional dealerships has been very poor. Nissan and Chevy dealerships often have ICE cars blocking their chargers, or they’re behind a locked gate at night. Besides, given their volume on the road, the most likely EV to take a sip at a Ford dealership would be a Tesla.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            “aren’t you one of the ones on here that regularly spouts about how most EVs are charged in their garage at night?”

            I say that to myself a lot. I haven’t driven a car more than 200 miles in a single day in over a dozen years, but I want to get a car with maximum range so that I can avoid all public charging.

            That being said, I still find myself being concerned about a cars charging network. I guess the reason is that I’m concerned I might need a good charging network someday. Chances are I won’t, but if I ever do, I know it’s there. This weekend I went past the Kennebunkport rest area on 95 in Maine and there were a massive number of Tesla chargers, but only two lonely CHAdeMO/CCS chargers. I’ll probably never use those chargers, but I’m glad they are there. If I do need one, I’m probably not going to find them all consumed by Chevy Bolt Lyft/Uber drivers sleeping between fares. Even if the chargers are taken, I won’t have to wait as long since Teslas quick charge at more than twice the charge rate of some of the cars that use CCS.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            So the only rate of charge stuff I could find was the 43 miles in 10 minutes from Ford vs 100 miles in 7 minutes on a V3 supercharger on a Tesla. That was from Electrek so YMMV but I’ll assume that is possible.

            I don’t know how plentiful the V3 superchargers are. There are no superchargers period around me. Furthermore I’ll assume those a very depleted batteries (The Tesla was listed at 2 percent) since that is when the quickest charging happens.

            Still, the Ford charge rate is applicable to me because there are no superchargers near me. I assume that is DC quick charging.

            But it is an advantage, I give you that. Then again, The Mach E still has the 7500 bucks from Uncle Sugar on the hood in my case as well as a real service network and parts availibility as well. I am not sure the supercharger network is that big of a deal in that light…If you have range anxiety at 300 miles of range then an EV is a tough sell regardless.

            If EVs take off there will be a charging standard adopted. It won’t be Teslas because literally everyone else uses something else. I don’t think it will significantly slow down Mach E sales, especially for those of us in other areas. However a 120ish mile EV is the top of my list so who knows.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          “What a laughable statement. Tesla is years ahead of the competition.”

          Are you suggesting every facet of Tesla’s vehicle designs are years ahead of anybody else in the industry?

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        I’m no Tesla fan but Tesla builds their vehicles. I’m wondering how much of this Ford is simply purchased, or is Ford assembling batteries into modules and developing a cooling system and battery management system all on their own? I’m interested in the supply chain, the battery pack cost and the capacity of the assembly line. A sporty 4-door SUV-ish Mustang inspired BEV sounds a lot more appealing to me than a Tesla Model 3, assuming it has similar range and price.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Owning your supply chain end to end has been tried, ironically most notably by Ford (recall the company owned rubber plantation to provide materials for model T tires). There are as many disadvantages as advantages.

          • 0 avatar
            Imagefont

            Art
            Totally agree that owning supply chain end to end is not essential and possibly detrimental. You have to do what you do best and purchase from others what they do best. Since the battery is such an integral and essential component of a BEV and likely the single most expensive component in the car Ford would need to manage this cost in order to be competitive. If you’re going to buy a part – electronics, wheels, brake components, seats, glass, etc., you can have multiple suppliers that compete on price. But the battery is such an essential part that you simply can’t get it from just anyone. They’ll likely have a single supplier and that needs to be a symbiotic relationship that benefits both for long term stability.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          WTH are you talking about? Tesla doesn’t make 100% of their cars, they’re largely reliant on suppliers just like everyone else in the industry. They HAD to do the gigafactory and make their own cells/batteries (in a JV with Panasonic) because no battery manufacturer was going to make the huge investment on their behalf while they were still in shaky startup phase.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Yeah, Tesla does rely on suppliers, but the suppliers are making many components that have been designed by Tesla as opposed to off-the-shelf supplier designs. For example, the Halbach Array motors use a Tesla process to put the array together and the motor is a Tesla design, but I think the motor is actually made by a supplier. The SuperBottle is a Tesla design but probably made by someone else. I think they make their own seats, but probably not the materials used to make them. Teslas electronics are their own design, but I’m not sure if they manufacture them or use an outside supplier. Of course, most of the components on the circuit boards are from suppliers.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Yeah, Tesla does rely on suppliers, but the suppliers are making many components that have been designed by Tesla as opposed to off-the-shelf supplier designs.”

            ….?

            eh? Are you under the impression this is somehow unique? “Build to print” has been an industry practice for a long time.

            I’m seriously amazed how so many people think this stuff is new just because they first heard of it from Tesla.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @JimZ:eh? Are you under the impression this is somehow unique?

            No! Having a grandparent and parent that were auto engineers, growing up in Dearborn right next to the Ford Engineering complex, and spending the early part of my career crawling around and studying auto plants, I know how cars are built. Dinner table conversations when I was a kid frequently consisted of complaints about suppliers.

            I never said that other auto companies aren’t the same as Tesla. I was only speaking about what I know about Tesla. I know absolutely nothing about the Mach E so I wasn’t going to say anything about it. For example, I don’t know if the motor is off-the-shelf or a Ford design. I don’t know what they’re doing for electronics either. I know very little about the vehicle.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    It looks like Ford is going squarely at the model 3 here rather than the low end (Bolt, Leaf) or High End (S, X, Audi, Jag, etc).

    Not only is this I think a solid approach as the 3 actually sells in some number, but more importantly this seems to be the spot people say they would go EV (Popular body style, solid range, realistic price + tax credits, real dealer network and manufacturer support)

    They say the EV market is set to grow substantially and I think this is the first vehicle other than the 3 on the market with the potential to do that.

    Questions are:

    Can Ford launch it without issue? People won’t put up with Tesla type issues from Ford and you can bet Consumer Reports isn’t going to shower it with praise if it is a quality nightmare compared to real cars.

    Will traditional EV buyers (read Tesla…that is the one that sells in any volume) go to a Ford dealership? Maybe. Tesla has put some people off though there is some 2007-08ish Apple fanboism there so who knows.

    Will this grow the pool of EV buyers? Again, it could. Problem is it is likely to be a limited model in comparison to the explorer and such it shares a lot with. “I can’t give you a deal on this, but look at this Explorer or Edge.

    I hope it is a success. I think this is the real effort from a real manufacturer I have been waiting for to see if the EV is the real deal and palletable to real, volume buyers that just want a car…not specifically an electric.

    I hope it does well enough to spawn a real, 2 door Mustang variant because you and I know, deep down inside that is the only way in Hades such a model lives…and you also know deep down inside it would be incredible and destroy drag strips in a manner never seen by any Detroit Muscle.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “I can’t give you a deal on this, but look at this Explorer or Edge.”

      Same story happens at all traditional dealers selling ICE cars and EVs, which is one reason why Tesla owns their own stores. It’s much easier to sell a Trax or Kicks vs a Bolt or Leaf to a customer who’s on the fence.

      The question is whether the customer already has their mind made up to go EV. If that’s the case, then the real competition is at a different store.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Agreed. I just think if you are going to make real money on something like this at this price point you are going to have to grow the EV market and sell it to people just looking for a vehicle…not specifically an electric vehicle.

        This is also what it is going to take to get widespread EV adoption. If EV’s don’t become the best vehicle option for most people in a given segment they will stay niche. The 3, Y, This, and the upcoming trucks are where this will or won’t happen.

        Furthermore Tesla is going to have to grow up as a company if that does start to happen.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      IIRC Ford was whispering that the MME was priced like a Model Y, but sized closer to a Model X. Sounds like a good deal, unless you want a 3rd row. The smaller LCD above the steering wheel is a nod to us older folks who don’t want to glance to the center screen to see how slow we’re driving.

      As for the launch, good question. Ford’s Cuautitlan plant produces (produced?) the Fiesta, hopefully won’t have any teething problems. IIRC Tesla is due to launch the Model Y next summer.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I really lament that they put a Mustang badge on it, but you’re right that it’s otherwise the right product for this niche. If they can leverage their strengths as an established organized automaker they might be able to alright with it.

      The “profit” in these cars is the CAFE credit generated by a reasonable volume of sales that will allow Ford to sell non-compliant vehicles with no penalty. Under current CAFE rules, the value of these credits can equal the margin on a traditional vehicle. So they actually need to sell a good number of these, not just a halo project.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Yes, you are right on on the CAFE stuff. If you ever want to see something like a 7.3 powered Mustang, you should be rooting hard for this.

        I think the Mustang badge serves a couple of purposes. First, it helps keep the brand relevant…Kids think the EV is cool and don’t seem to care about doors. Secondly, it kind of shows Ford is taking this seriously. Mustang is second only to the F series in brand equity at Ford and arguably the only non truck model with any brand at all. This shows they are taking it seriously (if it works or tanks the equity in the brand remains to be seen). I think it is meant to convey how seriously they are taking the electric stuff…again a strategy that could go either way.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I don’t get this idea that Ford is going after model 3 buyers, sure some of them may have settled for a sedan and were just biding their time until the Y makes it to market. But this is aimed at the CUV buyer and the fact that they open for pre-orders in a couple of days means they are attempting to attract the people waiting for the Y.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    BTW, among the leaked specs, has anyone seen towing capacity listed? I don’t pull far much anymore so even with limited range something like this could be viable for me, though I do love that truck

    • 0 avatar
      FerrariLaFerrariFace

      In typical SUV/CUV fashion, since its not designed as a tow vehicle like a pick-up truck, I would expect it to fall somewhere in the 1000-3500 range. And that’s pushing it.
      Of course, a Miata can tow 1000 pounds with virtually no effort, even though its official rating is zero. So go tow your yacht with this thing. Be a hero to us all.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        I used to have a hitch on my Miata and tow a Laser2 sailboat on a trailer with a very long tongue. The boat and trailer were half again as long as the car, I got a lot of stares with that.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I need like 5000 on a fairly short range. I believe a model X could do it, but the price isn’t even close to worth it. It would just be a way to combine 2 vehicles (Wife’s crossover and my pickup), but the truck is paid off so it’d have to be a pretty screaming deal to make sense.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Those leaked photos show no door handles. Fascinating.

    Overall, it looks like a Mustang and a Jaguar E-Pace had a one-night-stand ended up with a love child. Not the worst thing.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    That front end is horrific.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    Why do all the new EV’s have to be rockets. Would programming slower 0-60 acceleration into EV’s to be on par with your average 2.0T equipped ICE vehicle translate to more battery range?

    I’ve only read about options for braking but not overall performance. At the least, EV buyers should have the option of dialing up down EV motor response in accordance to their driving comfort level.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      The Ford comes in several trim levels with 0-60 ranging from the 3.5 to 7.5 second range it looks like with the range going up accordingly. Even the crazy fast Teslas aren’t always in that mode.

      There did however need to be a fast version of this one in particular because of that little pony stuck on the front.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Because they can omit the transmission (and replace it with a reduction gear) if they oversize the electric motor. This saves hundreds of pounds and thousands of dollars on each unit, and makes the packaging easier.

      Also, EVs get full torque at 0 rpm (sans what the TCS takes away), and the torque falls off at highway speeds. So, if you omit the transmission, you must oversize the motor in order to be able to drive normally at highway speeds.

      They wouldn’t do it this way if they didn’t have to.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      My Ioniq EV is not a rocket. Except for the missing gear changes, it’s like driving an Elantra.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Much more attractive then the Chevrolet Bolt, Nissan Leaf and BMW i3! Have to wait to see if it a subcompact or compact size like the Tesla Model Y. Mustang Mach E does not look like the size of the Audi E Tron or Jaguar F Pace which is midsize! Ford is on a role with the Mustang Mach E! Will it be reliable? Who knows!

  • avatar
    JimZ

    I’m just reveling in watching all of these Boomers lose their minds over this. It’s almost worth the $500 reservation fee to spite them.

    • 0 avatar
      Fliggin_De_Fluge

      Tee hee the joke of the moment, booooomers. Moronic MILLENNIALS sure do get a kick out of recycling trends that were garbage 35 years ago. Thats not innovation, nor is it something anyone will remember. Try harder because its been one big void of crap since 2000.

  • avatar

    I am guessing Ford will sell about 10,000 of these a year. Remember, Tesla like Apple has a cult-like following and their fans will buy anything the company produces. The truth is nobody asked for an EV Mustang, especially one that is a CUV.

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