By on November 14, 2019

ford

Maybe Corey was right. Despite sharing no architectural or mechanical DNA with the world’s first pony car, it seems Ford’s upcoming electric crossover — a vehicle Ford delights in calling “Mustang-inspired” — will actually bear the Mustang name.

This isn’t some wild rumor, either. It comes straight from the Glass House. A four-door electric crossover will soon be the “newest member of the Mustang family.”

Slated for a Sunday reveal near the L.A. Auto Show, the Mustang Mach-E will appear wearing the nameplate’s iconic pony badge.

If this all sounds sacreligious — an affront to the Mustang’s heritage — you may not be the only one feeling that way. But Ford’s gonna do what Ford’s gonna do, and it’s in the company’s interests, at least as far as the Mach-E is concerned, to instill as much Mustang appeal into the Mach-E as possible. The automaker wants its first dedicated, ground-up EV to be a hit. Muscle and name recognition forms a big part of that strategy.

Expected to appear with three battery options in tow, the uppermost of which should propel the Mach-E over 300 miles per charge, the crossover’s athletic prowess is something the company’s talked up repeatedly. Rear- or all-wheel drive will be on offer, and it’s likely some owners will revel in performing emissions-free burnouts. Who knows — marketing materials showing exactly this feat could be under consideration.

As soon as the curtain drops in L.A., would-be buyers can start tossing $500 refundable deposits at the automaker to stake their place in line. There will be a limited run of First Edition models, Ford claims.

After creating a Ford account and selecting their preferred dealer, Mach-E fans in the U.S. and Europe will then have to wait until the ordering window opens sometime next year. Chinese buyers will have to wait a bit before making their reservation. As for the vehicle’s on-sale date, that remains the subject of much speculation.

Is the decision to apply the Mustang name to a completely non-Mustang vehicle the beginning of the end for the rear-drive pony car coupe? That’s what Corey suggested not too long ago. Certainly, the unexpected decision to actually call this thing a Mustang, and not simply the Mach-E, lends weight to these concerns.

[Images: Ford]

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74 Comments on “Ford’s EV Has a Name, and… It’s the MUSTANG Mach-E...”


  • avatar
    IBx1

    Oh, just like how the automatic-only appearance package Edge ST is a real ST.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Is the decision to apply the Mustang name to a completely non-Mustang vehicle the beginning of the end for the rear-drive pony car coupe?”

    Sorry, but that’s as silly as Harley guys whining about their upcoming sport and adventure bikes; they’re not going to just up and cancel their cruisers.

    People really need to get a grip.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I don’t know I wouldn’t want to buy an older K5 Blazer and tell someone about my blazer for them to conjure images of the disgusting pile of crap currently wearing the Blazer name plate.

      • 0 avatar

        As I said, there will be a time of dual Mustangs before a consolidation into EV-only product. I don’t think anybody suggested they would up and cancel the traditional Mustang immediately.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Or this will just turn out to be the Mustang II and be a one generation deal.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          To listen to some people, as of this morning the Mustang somehow ceased to exist.

          • 0 avatar

            They’ve made the most difficult move, which is attaching the Mustang name to something which most definitely isn’t. EV is the future, this new thing will be here to stay.

          • 0 avatar
            Lokki

            Well….

            What we have proffered here is really in no way connected to the “fundamental Mustang concept” which is a small 2+2 coupe with sporting pretensions.

            It’s a lot like a (choose your own specific example) famous politician’s wife running for office: she has nothing in common with her famous spouse but the name. That does not reduce the legacy of the original politician of that name, but it is a cynical ploy for acceptance merely on the value of name recognition despite the lack of similarity.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “I don’t know I wouldn’t want to buy an older K5 Blazer and tell someone about my blazer for them to conjure images of the disgusting pile of crap currently wearing the Blazer name plate.”

        if the first thing they’d think of is the current Blazer CUV then they’re not any kind of enthusiast and will probably be bored to tears listening to you talk about some creaky old thing.

      • 0 avatar
        Thomas Kreutzer

        Why not? Those of us who have owned “real” Blazers and Jimmys already have to differentiate our rigs from the S10/S15 versions.

        Mustang bros will just say “Mustang coupe” or “Mustang E.”

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          “Why not? Those of us who have owned “real” Blazers and Jimmys already have to differentiate our rigs from the S10/S15 versions.“

          The S10 versions quite honestly were not a huge let down compared to this. They still offered a BOF construction, decent engine options if not small, RWD, transfer case options, Z71 options that were actually capable, and they weren’t a strain on the eye.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’ll wait for the Grand Mach-E.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Name aside, it would be very impressive if Ford can offer a BEV that is 50-state available and doesn’t light F-Series profits on fire and matches the Model 3 for range, price, and performance (across all its trims)

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    A different name would have been more palatable, and not screw with the Mustang faithful. Thunderbird, maybe?

  • avatar

    It’s all going to fall into place now, perhaps some more people will come around to my view with this news.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Your predicting a complete and total change over in the auto market where American consumers suddenly change to EVs in mass when the market currently has 1 single EV with decent sales that’s heavily supported by government mandates.
      Up to a year ago the entire market was pivoting toward a driverless future in the short term. Betting on EVs has not been a winning battle.

      • 0 avatar

        No, I’m predicting a niche model maintains a niche in future, which happens to be EV instead of gasoline.

        ADDED BONUS: It’s now a body style most consumers want.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Just to clarify, your prediction is that within 10 years there will be nothing badged “Mustang” with an ICE *and* nothing badged “Mustang” with only 2-doors?

          • 0 avatar

            Affirmative.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’d say Corey’s argument depends on how the market accepts EVs in general. I don’t see it going “EV” nearly as quickly as the hype says it will.

            As long as Ford is making the F-150 with a V-8, or a “hotter” Ecoboost six, I think they’ll continue to make a conventionally powered Mustang.

            It wouldn’t surprise me, though, if we saw a four-door Mustang (ala Stinger/A5 Sportback), and a non-electric CUV. “Mustang” is the strongest passenger-car brand Ford has, and it might make sense to build on that.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I could see that. I firmly believe Tesla has kind of changed the “performance car” landscape among the younger generation. I do hope there is room for a car based on this platform though…even if it wears Lincoln Continental Badges. Well, especially if that is the case.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I could also see the current Mustang Soldiering on like the old Fox Body (or Challenger) however.

            I don’t want to use the term “Game Changer”, but I think that is what is happening here no matter if this model succeeds or fails. The type of vehicle the Mustang represents has reached it’s final iteration as we know it. A quick glance at where this cars competitors are heading tells you that.

            Could be sad, or could be great. A 300 mile Electric Mustang that blisters a drag strip in the manner that the performance model S does would be great. It would be like the 60’s all over again where we are just waiting on tire tech to catch up.

            Furthermore Lincoln and Cadillacs with all of that smooth, effortless low end and tomb like quiet interiors…awesome.

            I am optimistic.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      there seem to be only two possible scenarios in everyone’s minds- either EVs will take over the market in less than a decade, or they’ll never be more than a niche product.

      I- somehow uniquely able to see a breadth of possibilities between the extremes, think EV adoption (outside of the Elon Musk Fan Club) will grow slowly and vehicles powered by internal combustion engines will be around for quite some time to come.

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        I basically agree with JimZ’s take here. I don’t think every consumer will want an EV. I do think the EV market will grow. However, I don’t think it will grow as fast as the carmakers say on Wall Street earnings calls.

        Ford obviously knows that the use of the Mustang name on this EV is provocative. I think they may be testing the waters to see if the public will accept the death of the pony car and embrace a CUV Mustang. If it was a movie, the poster would read, “The one car Ford couldn’t kill … But will it survive a second attack from … THE REVENGE OF THE CUV!!!”

        Analogous to the Ford Probe/Mustang scenario, only this time they are sticking with the name and waiting for America to blink.

        “uniquely able” – lol

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      If RAM is a brand, why can’t Mustang be a brand?

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Corey,

      Ford might be hedging here:
      – If it works, stick with it.
      – If it doesn’t take, it was a trial balloon.

      (Taking this approach, they aren’t locked into anything near-term.)

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Corey,

      A new thought on this: Mustang team sells CAFE credits to Mustang team.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Hopefully it will be RWD and will handle and accelerate better than the ICE version.

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    If the dealer network has not improved, nothing Ford offers will do well. Car dealers simply suck, maybe due to the way builders price cars, or to the way loans are structured, but no matter which, buying a car has to be the worst thing we are faced with today. Something has to be done, but there is no will to undertake change.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think the problem isn’t “will” – it’s politics. Dealer lobbies have paid state legislatures off to protect their turf. As I recall, that effectively locked Tesla out of selling cars in Michigan (though it appears that might have changed recently).

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Not really…they locked Tesla out of selling cars from factory owned stores. They are free to operate franchised dealerships like everyone else.

        I don’t care for that BTW, just pointing out that nobody has said Tesla can’t sell cars, just that they don’t get exemption from existing laws, like them or not.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          So all they have to do is operate differently in one state than they do in the other 49? Awesome.

          The law’s silly and it’s obviously bought and paid for by special interests.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I think all sorts of laws are silly and downright stupid. Honestly if it is that big of a deal perhaps Tesla should raise the issue with Michigan Voters.

            Is Tesla lobbying for the return of the EV tax credit for their products?

            So are states rights only good when they pertain to emissions standards in California?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I wasn’t aware that Michigan wasn’t allowing automakers to sell directly in their state to protect the health and well being of their citizens.

            (rimshot)

            At least California has a good reason to argue its’ “states rights” when it comes to emissions. Is there a similarly compelling reason for Michigan’s direct car sales laws? You tell me. And good luck with that – we both know this law’s in place because it was bought and paid for by the car dealers’ lobby.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Maybe, but again, between Michigan and their voters. I could argue California has all sorts of similarly dumb laws. But I don’t live in California so I really don’t care.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        nope. To this day I still see Model 3 in MI with Ohio temp tags.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Customers get some blame here too. They all say they want a fixed price model, but then get upset when they shop at such a place and can’t get a “deal” for themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      For all his foibles, I believe Elon Musk deserves credit for his direct to consumer sales model.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    And people hated the idea of the Ford Probe.

    Can’t wait to see a rebranded Hummer called the Camaro Ampera E-SS

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      The biggest haters of the Probe as a Mustang thing were the Baby Boomers. They aren’t really buying a ton of Pony Cars nowadays. They buy Avalons or get shuttled around by the Nursing Home’s Van.

      I recall the reception among the younger enthusiasts to the Probe to be positive.

      The Mustang has always been marketed to the younger crowd. EVs are cool with the younger generation. They see Teslas as the true performance cars…4 doors and all. I actually give kudos to Ford for doing this. They are keeping the car relevant in the long run and hedging their bets keeping the old one around.

      Honestly at 300 miles of Range (assuming it can deliver) I really see no more reason for an ICE powered car as anything short of a toy for anyone not a road warrior or needing a work truck.

      Furthermore it seems like a car sized right for most buyers. The Bolt and Leaf are nice but smaller than most Americans actually buy. The price is in the meat of the market as well.

      If they don’t botch the launch and if the car delivers, I think it may be an important model for both Ford and the EV in the US. On the surface this is the first EV positioned to go after the model 3 with respect to size, pricing, and range/performance. Other makes have gone after the S and the high end, but it is cars like this and the 3 (and Y) that will lead to mass adoption of EV’s if it happens (and potentially pickups)…not S Class Benz competitors or electrified econo boxes.

      The Mustang was a sporty Falcon…they took a mainline model and made it something special. In that light I think this has every right to wear the badge…if it delivers the goods promised.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Come to think of it, it hasn’t been until recently that the Mustang lived on a platform that was anything short of pedestrian (Falcon, then the Pinto, then the Fox of Fairmont fame). And isn’t the next gen non Mach E Variant due to move to the Explorer’s Chassis?

        I don’t think it is likely that the 2 door Mustang will die anytime soon (though it may eventually…again my kids see Teslas as the pinnacle of cool), but it could very well spawn an electric variant of the coupe which is likely to be the fastest factory pony car ever to hit a 1/4 mile strip.

  • avatar
    Menar Fromarz

    So the Ford “ Mustang” formally a model has now made the quantum leap to “ Brand”. Like “ Mini”. Brand whores.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Works well for Jeep

      • 0 avatar
        Menar Fromarz

        I get what your saying, but Jeep was a Willy’s product that was a model that sold with their cars, and not spun into a “brand” until later. The landscape is filled with models that became a brand in their own right, it just seems like the new “Mustang Brand” is an attempt to cash in on the storied Mustang name, since so many of their models/brands were total slow car crashes that may taint any hope of launching a new “Thunderbird” for example.

  • avatar
    phreshone

    Would rather they crap on the Thunderbird nameplate that hasn’t been used in over a decade…

    rising out of the ashes, The Ford Thunderbirde

  • avatar
    haroldhill

    Doesn’t look like the Cayenne is going to bring about the demise of the 911…

  • avatar
    xflowgolf

    Dusting off the Thunderbolt name would’ve been neat. Although GM has the Bolt already, which doesn’t help anything.

  • avatar
    slap

    It’s brand dilution. Like when Cadillac started selling the Cimarron.

  • avatar
    WildcatMatt

    On the one hand, “Mach E” is a great name for an electric Mustang.

    On the other hand, the application of any Mustang name to something not a coupe variant is… odd.

    It’s an interesting gamble and I think invoking the Probe here is spot-on. Right now this feels like brand dilution, but I think it’s also a trial balloon:

    If the public accepts a CUV-format Mustang, start the deathwatch for the non-CUV.

    If the public rejects a CUV-format Mustang, expect a rebrand for the CUV.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    Well, Hell (Michigan) froze over the other day!

    The new Malaise Era is upon us!

    SMH! (::Drops mic!::)

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is a mistake.

    “Mach E” would have been a fine name and would have nodded at the Mustang heritage without negatively affecting it.

    Using the Mustang name for a CUV, no matter how RWD and performance-oriented, is just going to get everyone upset.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      It will certainly get many “car” people upset, the question is how will the non-car people react.

      I think they could have used another horse name if they wanted a stronger link to the Mustang w/o the risk of upsetting us car people. Unfortunately Pinto is out of the question but maybe Thoroughbred? That way they could put a horse in the grill and share some commonality with the Mustang and Bronco(s).

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I wouldn’t be shocked if rather than ending with “Available at your Ford/Lincoln/Mercury dealer” as Ford ads did back in the day future Ford advertisements ended with “Available at your Ford/Bronco/Mustang dealer” with the only thing under the Ford Proper banner being the F series, Ranger, and Commercial offerings.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Badge engineering.

    Or should I say Badge e-ngineering?

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