By on October 28, 2019

It’s hardly unusual for an automaker to boost incentives in the fall, stimulating buyer interest in a bid to clear out current-model-year inventory, but market forces appear to have made Ford extra generous this October.

Starting late last week, the automaker is adding an extra $1,000 off most 2019 Mustangs, with extra financial grease heaped on EcoBoost models. It’s more cash than buyers got last year at this time, but then again, the Mustang isn’t exactly where it would like to be.

According to CarsDirect, the extra grand in discounts dries up on November 13th. Until then, U.S. buyers can expect to see $2,500 off most models, plus a $750 inventory bonus if the particular vehicle has been in stock for over 61 days. If you’re a deal-seeking cheapskate who’s fine not having a V8, that means $3,250 off a base coupe that starts at $26,395 before destination.

Buyers looking at an uplevel EcoBoost Premium coupe stand to save more — up to $4,250. CarsDirect notes that in late October of 2018, discounts topped out at about $2,500. It also notes that the Mustang is one of those vehicles where buyers might save themselves considerable cash by stretching their payments over a longer term, depending on region. In this case, a zero-percent loan for 6 years comes out cheaper than a 5-percent loan over 5 years. If you can find it, hop aboard.

While this October’s combination of incentives tops last year’s, there’ll probably still be Black Friday deals worth waiting for come a few weeks from now. Don’t despair.

As pony cars make like sedans and dwindle in volume, the pressure’s on to move remaining inventory in any way possible. Through the end of September, U.S. Mustang sales fell 10.1 percent in 2019. Last year saw the model sink 7.4 percent compared to 2017. In fact, 2015, the first full year of the current-generation model, was a post-recession high point for the nameplate. That year’s volume (122,439) was the highest since 2007, before which the Mustang would traditionally sell well into the six-figure range.

You’d have to go back to 1993 before finding another five-figure sales year, and how old was the Fox-body ‘Stang by that date? That’s right, 14 years old. Even then, the aging pony sold better than in 2017, 2018, and most certainly in 2019. While the nameplate suffered worse volume during and immediately after the recession, today’s economy is far better. Consumers just aren’t buying as many 2+2 playthings with their hard-earned cash.

All that said, Ford’s trying hard to make the nameplate appealing. This past year saw the launch of a new GT350 and GT500, plus the introduction of a far more attainable EcoBoost High Performance Package. On the horizon looms a hybrid, potential all-wheel drive, and, if things don’t turn around, maybe — just maybe — something that strikes fear into the heart of heritage fans and motoring purists.

[Images: Ford]

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75 Comments on “Incentivized ‘Stang: Cash Falls Like Leaves on Outgoing 2019 Mustang...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    “Consumers just aren’t buying as many 2+2 playthings with their hard-earned cash.”
    It doesn’t help that Ford refuses to offer a V6, nor that all automakers treat V8s as forbidden fruits reserved for the upper class instead of being a $500 option across the board as it should.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      A 5.0 Mustang starts at $35,000 prior to haggling. V-8 powered Camaros and Challengers can be had for similar money. How can you argue that these are not cars that a person of non-upper-class means can buy?

      Do I wish a V-8 Mustang cost $500 more than the base model? Absolutely. Is this out of reach for most buyers? God, no. And for that money, you get something that would absolutely demolish about 90% of the stuff that you grew up drooling over. Today’s pony cars – even the base ones – are INSANE performance bargains. I’d say that if you want one, go forth and buy one with my blessing.

      And, yet, unless the sales figures are lying, these cars aren’t selling like they used to. Personally, I think the culprit is pickup trucks, which are today’s “muscle car”. Sucks, but there you have it.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I find it hard to believe it costs a whole $10k more to build a V8 over a turbo 4. That’s a lot of money for what many consider a toy, and a big step up for someone buying their first car from a brand thats not typically known for reliability or other outstanding traits.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          People who want something practical aren’t going to be buying these cars, so if you ask me, it’s as much of a toy at $25,000 as it is at $35,000. And part of that difference is equipment – the V-8 does come with some different mechanical features and some more interior stuff, though that alone won’t justify the price.

          But having said that, the question really isn’t why the V-8 costs so much more, but whether it’s worth $35,000. I’d say at that price point, it’s an absolute steal.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            $35,000 for a base V8 car just does not sound like a bargain in any way. That’s a lot of money for a sports car with no options other than V8. Yes I realize in the real world prices can become more sane and sink below $30k, but there shouldn’t be any reason this isn’t available for $25-26k with this engine.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          It also doesn’t cost an extra $20,000 to build an Escalade ESV versus a Suburban with the 6.2-liter, but there you have it.

          Automakers are in the business of making money. There are enough people who insist that a proper Mustang must have a V8 (yourself included) and are willing to put their money where their mouths are. Thus, Ford is able to price that variant at $35,000.

          I don’t see what the big deal is, here.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ It also doesn’t cost an extra $20,000 to build an Escalade ESV versus a Suburban with the 6.2-liter, but there you have it.”

            Of course not, but the difference is Cadillac is supposed to be a premium brand, which I likely wouldn’t ever buy anyhow. Ford is suppose to be a mainstream brand, and asking $35 Grand for a base no options mainstream car with a V8 just seems absurd.

          • 0 avatar
            Superdessucke

            This. My local dealer had a GT PP2 back in August I was going to consider and it was gone before I could even go back for a second look.

            Said same dealer has no ’19 GTs left. Just 2 EcoBoosts, 1 Bullitt and 1 GT350. The Ecos have the higher incentives of the four ’19s. One Eco has over 10k in collective incentives on it!

            People buying these specialty cars are going to want the V-8, not a 4-cylinder that sounds like a vacuum cleaner, regardless of how quick it is.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Obviously they don’t just upgrade the engine and call it a day. It’s just not stuff you can see, touch, feel from the cab. And you can thank them in another life (for upgrade brakes, cooling, drivetrain, suspension, gear ratios, etc).

            The base GT is the base Mustang for many of us. Or until they offer another V8 in a stripper notch slo-back LX with crank windows and radio delete.

            The GT is the one you’ll still take pleasure in owning/driving once the clearcoat is dust, seats torn, dinged up, etc, and worth more, intrinsically and actually, than a well kept or nice EB.

            Think about which ones don’t ever show up at BHPH lots.

          • 0 avatar
            brn

            Thanks DenverMike. Anyone who doesn’t realize the GT brings more than just a bigger motor, shouldn’t have a GT.

            Btw: Better seats too.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    >>to go back to 1993 before finding another five-figure sales year,

    I assume that is supposed to say six-figure sales year?

    • 0 avatar
      aajax

      Nope.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      1991 would be the first year sales dipped below a six digit figure and then would recover until 2008 and then decline till 2015 and into 2016 where the marque again surged to six figures.

      However as of Q3 2019 Mustang has sold nearly 56,000 cars with Dodge close behind at nearly 47k and Camaro at nearly 37k. That said compared to the rest of the industry the American sports coupes are kicking butt!

      The next closest competitor is the Toyota 86 at just over 2,500 cars and if you broaden the category to mainstream “sports” cars then the Miata is the next closest competitor at nearly 6,400 cars.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I don’t know the exact breakout of the pony car market by engine, transmission, trim, fleet, etc. However, this incentive structure seems to imply that the higher-trim EB versions need more cash on the hood to sell versus the V8 versions.

    I’m not sure that making the car more expensive (with hybrids and AWD) and less Mustang-y is the cure all that the denizens of the internet expect it to be.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      “I’m not sure that making the car more expensive (with hybrids and AWD) and less Mustang-y is the cure all that the denizens of the internet expect it to be.“

      +1
      The further we move into hybridization, smaller engines, adding weight with AWD and the high costs associated with all that, the less cars that are being sold.

      These “Must haves” for auto journalists are “not buying it” for consumers.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      AWD will be a short-term shot in the arm because it will improve 0-60 times and make current owners feel inadequate.

      “Hybrid” could be virtually anything, and it’s hard to evaluate how it will affect sales until you know what it is. It seems to me the most likely step would be to put in the 3.0 V6 hybrid powertrain from the Aviator/Explorer. That wouldn’t do much in the US but it could boost sales overseas, both by reducing displacement taxes and by allowing an EV mode to get around congestion charges.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Using AWD just to improve the first 0.25 seconds of take off seems wholly unnecessary. Wider rears are nearly as effective, much cheaper, and come with a much lower penalty.

        I also don’t discount that over seas a hybrid option may be of interest, but if it adds significant cost to platform development – then that affects every one buying the platform regardless of options and costs are key to getting these in the hand of young single folk.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Do you think young, single guys are buying these anymore? I don’t, and I suspect it probably wouldn’t matter whether a V-8 is standard – I think these buyers have switched to pickups and Jeeps. It makes sense – if you’re a guy in your late twenties, and you’re buried in a five or six year loan for $35,000, doesn’t it makes sense to get into something that might still work for your life a few years down the road, when you might have a family? A four door pickup or (or, to a lesser extent) Jeep works as a family vehicle. A Mustang doesn’t.

          Cars like the Mustang are, by nature, aimed at older people. There are fewer of them, but they can spend more. The answer? Sell a smaller number of higher-priced vehicles. That means more tech, more content, more convenience.

          And AWD isn’t just about faster 0-60 times – it’s about making the car more usable year-round in places like the one where I live. That’s important to older buyers (it’d be important to me).

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            “ if you’re a guy in your late twenties, and you’re buried in a five or six year loan for $35,000, ”

            And there lies the problem. Pricing these too high and selling to an older crowd.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Only 35? Was that diploma on sale?

            The girls I dated, geez prob 50-60K on average.

            60K to get a job that doesn’t even pay as well as it did 30 years ago in adjusted wages. I remember Ashley went to Westminster to then make $11.00 at some ritzy childcare center. I was stunned, and this was like 2015.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I assumed he was speaking of a car loan, though $30-$35 for a 4 year degree doesn’t seem odd to me, it can be done much cheaper that that if you want.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            This isn’t a Versa, Hummer – even a base Mustang is capable of performance that would shame most ’80s “supercars.” You can’t sell something like that for compact-car money.

            Older folks are the ones with money. Makes sense to go after them.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            “Older folks are the ones with money. Makes sense to go after them.”

            That right there is a multi-billion-dollar idea which the automakers have never grasped.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Older folks don’t necessarily have the money; most of them are on a fixed income and are either still paying for a mortgage or renting a place that takes half or more of their Social Security. They can hardly afford to buy a fancy car unless they made all their money and used it intelligently during their working careers (which is not something I see with most.)

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        C/D got the current Mustang GT 10A with the 275-width tires to go 0-60 in 3.8. Even for someone like me the difference between 3.7 and 3.8 isn’t going to move the needle but YMMV.

        The Coyote and 2.3EB aren’t torque monsters so the car isn’t really subject to big traction trouble with anything but the base tires. On the GT500 (or other future options) it might become an issue.

        My biggest problem with AWD is that a “basic” system is going to bring about Understeer City and a fancy Focus RS-style system is going to be quite expensive. Plus both will add weight.

        On hybrids, maybe it will help overseas but I agree that I don’t see it doing much in the US. The lo-po 3.0 system would probably be a tick slower than the current EB and the big-hoss 3.0 system would cost Shelby money.

        • 0 avatar
          Flipper35

          The only vehicle I ever had here in the upper midwest is a 1978 Ramcharger with a small lift and off road tires that I actually used off road. I dont see that the 3 days out of the year where they haven’t plowed yet where you might use AWD over the expense of having it the other 362 days.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I looked at and priced the Mustang before buying a leftover 2018 Challenger GT. The Mustang drove and handled fine but I could have used a tad more room for my 6’2” self.
    What could have sold me on the Mustang is if the hybrid and or awd was available.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      5’11” @225lbs here. Mustang interiors have always been too cramped for me. FCA LX cars are a much better fit for me too.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        The 2011-14 Mustang was a bit roomier inside for me as well as rear seat passengers. However they’re pricey on the used car market particularly ones that aren’t flagged with issues on CARFAX.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Central truth of the matter: sales of cars like this are falling. Why? Because the target market – younger guys who want something “cool” and somewhat fast to go tool around town in – have switched to pickups, which have become today’s muscle cars.

    Regardless of why this is happening, though, the bottom line is that this is where the market’s going, and it’s been happening for some time now. So…we either 1) stay the course and watch cars like this disappear altogether, or 2) we support bringing new tech and ideas into the segment, like performance hybrids and/or AWD., and chase different buyers.

    I do think V-8s will stick around in cars like the Mustang as long as companies like Ford continue to build V-8 powered pickups. But I don’t see anything wrong with upgrading the

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      I don’t necessarily disagree with you, but it’s a bit of an exaggeration IMO to say these cars will disappear without drastic changes.

      The Mustang is 5 model years old now, and has had the same basic look to a non enthusiast since 2005.

      The Camaro is 4 model years old now, and has had the same basic look to a non enthusiast since 2010.

      The Challenger is 12 (!!!) model years old now, and has had the exact same look since 2008.

      Impulse or fun purchases like this type of car are going to inevitably decline as they get older and less new/exciting. Look at the sales figures from every Corvette generation. Add to that the current sales contraction in the auto industry in general, and it’s not surprising that sporty cars are declining.

      Go radical with the looks before you go radical with the powertrain. I sincerely doubt that there’s a bunch of people out there just waiting for a hybrid AWD Mustang. I bet there’s a bunch who would consider buying one if it looked like something designed in the last decade.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        “The Mustang is 5 model years old now, and has had the same basic look to a non enthusiast since 2005.”

        The model change in 2015 was pretty drastic – Ford switched to a variation of the corporate front end and adopted a coupe shape made popular by Ian Callum. Where the previous cars aped the early 64-65 cars with dash for 67-70 thrown in here and there.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “Because the target market – younger guys who want something “cool” and somewhat fast to go tool around town in – have switched to pickups, which have become today’s muscle cars.”

      Correct.

      There are large swaths of America (I have relatives in a couple of them) where men just don’t drive cars anymore. If you’re a man, you have a truck, and that’s just how it is.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        What is crazy is these trucks cost MORE then a V8 Mustang. So its clearly not the price that is holding these back. People are just obsessed with trucks for reasons I fail to understand. I am in the position where I have both (helps when you stick to used vehicles) but I avoid driving my truck as much as possible. Its just no fun to drive and get worse mileage then my C7. Basically my truck is just for towing.

        However anyone with kids and/or dogs pretty much has to go with (at minimum) a 4 door vehicle. Once you cross that line you might as well get a bed and a lift along with a V8. A truck is a “cool” solution to the 4 door problem. Sedans are seen as lame, thus nobody wants one. CUVs are mommy mobiles. Sports cars, especially with manual transmissions, have become nothing but an old-person car. Well unless its a Porsche, they are still cool apparently.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I think it goes beyond any need for four doors. Young single guys are doing RCSBs, not sports cars. We have reached a place where a truck is an essential component of masculinity in a lot of communities.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “essential component of masculinity in a lot of communities.”

            That could be true in some communities but I think it is “Utility” that is the driving factor in the popularity of 4-dr pickup trucks.

            A lot of women, of ALL ages and races, drive 4-dr pickup trucks in MY region. A lot of them do so because it is the one and only vehicle the family has and can afford.

            There is no substitute for what a 4-dr pickup truck does so well.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @DAL, I’m not seeing RCSB trucks in our area, when I stopped at Home Depot apparently the Milwaukee rep was there and I parked next to his branded truck a new F-150 RCSB and I took notice because it is such a rare configuration now.

            @HDC, Yeah in our area there are lots of women driving crew cab pickups, mainly 1/2 ton 5.5′ but the horsey set like their HD pickups for pulling their horse trailers to the trails or shows.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Scoutdude, when I lived in NM, we saw a lot of purdy, high-maintenance ladies driving a Ridgeline with a one-horse trailer behind it, probably on their way to the barrel races, or some other festivity.

            Now that we have moved to El Paso, TX, the cowgirls, boots and all, even with short shorts, are wild and free driving their 4dr F150 or 4dr Silverado, with or without trailer.

            I love it!

            You know, there ain’t nothing quite like it and even at age 73 I can still appreciate a good “thang.”

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “and chase different buyers.”

      But what buyers? The Stinger offers 4-doors, AWD, and is well-reviewed, but it sells in rounding error numbers. Sporty cars are cratering almost everywhere. A hybrid AWD DCT shooting brake “Mustang” isn’t going to do any better.

      I say that your #1 is the answer. Stay the course and let them die off if that is the way the market is going. Going the route of the 1975 Dodge Charger is just lighting money on fire.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I’d hesitate to compare the Stinger with the Mustang – the former has failed largely because the Kia brand has no cred in the sport-sedan market. But Mustangs have TONS of cred. It’s an iconic nameplate with almost 60 years’ worth of history. Why not build on it?

        But maybe something like the Stinger is part of the answer here. I’ve long thought that it might make sense for the D3 to make their most iconic performance models (think Corvette, Challenger, etc) into “brands” that would encompass several models, with the coupe being one of them. So how about a “Mustang Stinger”? Build it from the Explorer platform, make it lower-slung and less practical than the Stinger, with Mustang styling. Call it a “Mustang Grand Tourer” or something like that, give it a hot motor (preferably a V-8), and sell it for Stinger GT2 money. Think “$50,000 American Panamera.”

        Would you stop by the Ford store to look at that car? I would. Hell yes.

        What buyers would this chase? Easy answer: boomers and Gen X folks who want something cool, with an iconic name, that’s NOT a CUV, with a $50,000 budget. Plenty of us out there. I suspect you’d be one of them, even if you’re not an old guy like me. :)

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Personally, I’ve realized that I way overbought utility with both the Charger and Stinger so I’ll very likely be going 2-door (and maybe 2-seater) next time.

          However, I know that I’m an atypical part of the market. I’m just not sure a Mustang “GranCoupe” would increase sales enough to be worthwhile.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          @Mike,

          I like that idea and I’m one of the ones who thought the SRT brand was a good concept, just poorly executed.

          “Mustang”, “Camaro”, and “Corvette” likely have better brand favorability than “Ford” or “Chevy” at this point, so what is there to lose? And if we get some more RWD V8 powered four door cars out of the deal, so much the better.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          “ Call it a “Mustang Grand Tourer” or something like that, give it a hot motor (preferably a V-8), and sell it for Stinger GT2 money. Think “$50,000 American Panamera.””

          I would 100% be in a showroom with my butt in the seat to test drive.

          My SS sedan has been an ideal car to me, I think it’s a better midsize than full-size but it’s the perfect car for a first car all the way up to a family car, and performance on the weekend.
          I welcome choice in this segment, my SS drives and commands the rode infinitely better than every other midsize on offer that I have rented (almost all of them). A 4 door V8 Mustang has my attention. I’m also 100% sure it would be a hit in Australia.

          Just pull an Aussie and offer a wagon and ute for 4 cars on one platform.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “ Call it a “Mustang Grand Tourer” or something like that, give it a hot motor (preferably a V-8), and sell it for Stinger GT2 money. Think “$50,000 American Panamera.””

            No, call it a Galaxie and give a version a really nice interior and a star on the hood and call it a Continental. They built 4 door Mustangs back in the day. They were called Falcons and/or Fairlanes in the 60’s. Did the same in the 80’s and called them LTD’s, Fairmonts, and alot of other things. Never called em’ Mustangs though…I did once see an LTD (I Think) with a Mustang front clip at a car show, but Ford didn’t build it

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      Probably a minority compared to the import crowd, but the FB Mustang group I am is mostly younger guys. Of course this group is geared toward the cheaper 3.7L V6. I don’t know if the EB owners skew younger (or more female) than the GT/V8 model.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Peak 70’s pony car GM was selling around 400k F-body cars per year. plus a fair number of Monza Sunbirds.
      Even the maligned but prescient Mustang II sold in numbers compared to a popular CUV today.
      The boomers liked their sporty cars and considered rear seat and trunk room to be secondary.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “Boomer times” made it easy for cars like the Mustang to be practical. Mr. Brady got away with rocking a cool Challenger droptop because Mrs. Brady was stuck carting around the Brady kids in a station wagon.

        It wasn’t just Hollywood – my mom’s first three cars were an early ’60s Nova II, a ’67 Mustang, and a ’72 Malibu – all coupes. People didn’t worry about strapping kids into the backseat back then. The good news is that this made it easy for my mom to rock a super-cool Mustang to the grocery store with a four-year-old (me) and a newborn (my brother) lollying around the back seat; the bad news was that if Mom hit anything in her super-cool Mustang, me and my brother would have become projectiles.

        (And did I mention that Mom had a drinking problem at the time? Like I said…times have changed…)

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Yep. At age 4 months I was carefully wrapped in blankets and placed in a correctly sized drawer, and driven from California to Washington, otherwise loose, in the back of my mom’s RX-3 wagon.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            …points to area where stitches were administered after rolling the wrong way and contacting a sharp metal edge in the back of a real-live station wagon…

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      “Why? Because the target market – younger guys who want something “cool” and somewhat fast to go tool around town in”

      The average age buyer of a Mustang is 52. The Challenger was 49 IIRC. I don’t know what the target market is, but if it’s younger guys who want something cool- the boat has been missed.

      I don’t know if they (young guys) have switched to trucks or not, but I don’t see that much aspiration to cars like this in younger folks. The younger people who seem to be interested in cars at all seem to be more interested in entry luxury-ish cars like an A3 or 3series and working their way up.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        I know a lot of guys who are under 35 and would be lining up to buy a Camaro/Challenger/Mustang, if they could afford anything close to what any decent one goes for. They don’t really want an EB Mustang, a V6 Challenger, or a V6 Camaro, they want the V8 cars. I see people of all ages, especially guys looking at my Challenger in the store parking lots all the time, and it’s obvious that they aren’t thinking, “I would never buy a car like that!”. At least twice a week, I get asked about my car from kids, young and old adults. They want to know what engine it has and is it a Hellcat? Some are disappointed when I say “No, it’s a Scat Pack”, but most ask, “How much power does it have?”. The 485 I answer them back seems to be enough to keep them talking. I’ve taken a couple of people for rides and the want is obvious. They are more than impressed with it, just as people are impressed riding in my friend’s Bullitt Mustang. Sadly, but understandably, no one seems interested in another friend’s 2018 Camaro, they just hate the looks of it.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    F.O.R.D.’s reputation is what keeps me out of these things. The trucks are okay but I don’t know a single Ford CAR owner who is happy with their car as the warranty approaches expiration.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      105K on my Ford car and it’s still a great car. My previous Ford car has over 200K on it. Neighbor owns it now.

      Now you know two.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @brn: Nope. Don’t know either of you. I didn’t say I don’t know OF anyone, I said I don’t KNOW anyone, and I know a lot of Ford owners plus having owned three Fords myself. Again, the trucks are pretty good but the cars rattle, squeak and start breaking down consistently in less than three years–many in less than a year off the showroom floor. That’s a problem I’ve never had with any GM product I’ve known and even FCA waits ’til the warranty expires. (Can’t say the same for the Daimler/Chrysler matchup, though.)

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Don’t tell that to the guy with over 200k on his S-197 GT500! Dude is elated having been to 45 states and 3 Canadian provinces in his Mustang plus track in there.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Jeebus Tapdancing Christ you want how much and I can’t get the V6 (let’s forget for a moment that’s the secretary’s car)?

    **** me.

    …I think I just channeled Tres.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      I was looking at new V6 Mustangs in 2014 simply because they were knee deep in online listings for $16k.

      Now I look at them used and they are priced higher.

      I probably should have picked one up.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      For any 2011-2014 V6 Mustang hunters: the Performance Pack version came with 3.31 gears out back. Most, like mine, came with some “gasoline” friendly 2.73 gears which really kill the fun factor.

      This summer I replaced ’em with 3.55s and an aftermarket tune from MPT. Now I don’t have enough rear tire!

  • avatar
    duncanator

    I’ve been looking into purchasing a 2019 Mustang Bullitt, but local dealers are insisting on only a slight reduction off of MSRP. For a vehicle that costs that much, I want more features that other cars at that price point. I have offered 46k, but have been turned away/laughed at by many, many dealerships. So, they can keep them! The cars have been sitting on their lots for the few months I’ve been watching them and yet they won’t budge. Oh well, time is on my side.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      When I looked at Mustangs I noticed many dealers had one Bullit and one Shelby on the showroom floor plus a base and a premium ecoboost. Either the Bullit and Shelby are the dealer halo cars or they don’t want to let them go at markdown.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      My friend ended up paying $600 under sticker on his Bullitt. Made me feel a lot better paying about $5300 under for my Challenger. That $600 under was the best price he had for one without the Recaro seats, which IMHO, shouldn’t have been put into them from the factory unless specifically ordered with them by the buyer of them. For us old guys the heated/cooled seats and steering wheel are a must, and the Recaros are just downright uncomfortable.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    Trucks and SUV’s of today, for the most part have significantlky better performance than muscle cars of youre, plus they have multiple uses. Add to that the fact that in these speed limited license points insurance cost times you cant even sue all the performance of an SUV the mustang has far more limited appeal.

    Yes its a cool fast car, but you cant really use the faste except on track, and its a small car with limted back seats. No wonder then t hat the challenger is the slaes champ, its more useable.

    But unless the speed limit is raised to 85 and traffic thins, a pony car is really justa styling statement for some youth(porb 4cyl) or a nostalgia purchase for the aged. For those who really use the performance there is the gt350 and thats understandably a very limited market, most would rather have a raptor.

    There’s always going to be a mustang market, maybe not a 4 cyl secretary car version. Ford has to figure out how to design a mustang that makes money at 50-100kK units per year and keep it in production a decade to amortize costs. It will probably be an upscale’ish vehicle compared to now, ie like a v8 Gt, which already sells well as a premium vehicle in Europe and Australia.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’ve been coming to this website since 2007 and if I had a shot of hard liquor for every time somebody derided the Ecoboost Mustang as a “secretaries car” – I’d have alcohol poisoning.

    You know what secretaries drive? (Judging by the 3 I have)
    Buick Encore
    Dodge Durango GT AWD
    Silverado crew cab 5.3 V8

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      I’ve been thinking about what some former secretaries of mine drove.

      Mid 90’s Ford Probe GT-V6 manual
      Mid 80’s Toyota Corolla GTS manual
      69 Camaro 250-6 column shift Powerglide.
      Hardly bland. All respectable nice cars.

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      PrincipalDan,

      The ‘[Administrative Assistant’s] car’ terminology has been around for decades. It doesn’t really mean ‘[Administrative Assistant]’ – it is shorthand to represent the two basic types of pony-car drivers:
      – Performance-oriented
      – Appearance-oriented

      And yes there is overlap between the two.

      [When I worked at GM Headquarters in the early 90’s, the CEO one floor above me had two dedicated AA’s. Congratulations to you on either a) having more responsibilities than the head of what was then the largest company on the planet, or b) working in an industry which is even more backward today than GM was 25 years ago.]

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        1 – Receptionist/Student Attendance/Employee Leave Secretary
        2 – Bookkeeper
        3 – Registrar

        (But they serve the office in general, yes I am their supervisor)

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    I had a 5.0 a couple of years ago as a rental. I was excited to drive it but I hated the thing. Miserable visibility in all directions. The hood was so high I couldn’t tell what was in front of me when driving over a rise. Terrible packaging and space utilization (weird trunk opening) considering the car is so large. Very uncomfortable to get in and out of. And a powerful engine hampered by a laggy throttle and transmission reluctant to shift (and too many gears all selected by committee). It’s a one trick pony plagued with infamous Ford reliability and quality. Worst of all it just wasn’t fun to drive, not terribly sporty or engaging. Big let down.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I haven’t cared for past Mustangs, but I loved the 2018 GT almost as much as anything I’ve ever driven. If it doesn’t move your “fun to drive” needle at all then I’d be interested to know what does.

      • 0 avatar
        Imagefont

        Since you ask…
        I still have a ‘94 Miata I purchased new. It sits in the garage and I think of freeing up that space. Then I drive it and I just can’t part with it. Great steering, great brakes, balance, fun to drive. It’s not powerful but it’s fast enough (for me). It’s engaging, immediate and you feel everything.
        So more like that.
        It’s also useless in every other way although with careful packing you can take it camping for three weeks without ever staying in a hotel. Great motor in the 5.0 though.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Ford has a real problem with lack of quality and reliability, from the design phase to the build phase, in almost all of their vehicles (F Series being an exception), and it seems to be getting worse (look at the unbelievably bad NEW Explorer/Aviator, the Focus, the Ecosport joke, etc., the EPIC transmission and electrical system fail rates, let alone major issues with structural/body integrity and other major issues).

    Ford makes hot garbage, just like Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GM),wiith very few exception.

    The Mustang is just frumpy now, with a useless rear seat, old school suspension, a lot of them having vacuum cleaner enhanced 4-bangers now, and Hackett is one of the worst CEOs ever.

    Ford is a huge short. The only things saving them from literal Chapter 11 Bankruptcy are 1) the F Series, and 2) super easy credit conditions for even the sh*ttiest publicly traded corporations they can issue billions in bonds at something like 8 basis points higher than the yield on 10 year U.S. treasury note and have them purchased on the regular.

    Ford also has truly unbelievable pricing, as in wannabe-Audi pricing, which is a joke.

    Ford is a fundamentally awfully run company, with horrid quality control, where imbeciles in the executive suites are once again not jetting competent engineers and QC people do their thing.

    It speaks volumes that KIA has exceptionally better quality from the smallest part to the essential body structure at a much lower price than Ford or Lincoln, and that KIA and Hyundai actually have badges that are no longer viewed as lower prestige than Ford/Lincoln vehicles now (the Telluride, Stinger, Pallisade, Azera, Santa Fe, Forte, Elantra, etc. are all great examples of this).

    Ford is in horrific shape at a deep, core level.

  • avatar
    jdowmiller

    There’s a 6 speed at my local dealer with a price listed at a little over 33k with all these incentives. This seems like a deal to me. It might be because I’ve been shopping vehicles that cost in the mid-40s. Most of those vehicles are sensible rides like Lexus ES350, Audi Q3 and even a Tacoma Pro. But the idea of buying something like that instead of a 460 hp beast for 10k more makes me feel ill. I already own a Corolla that I’m keeping forever. It’s time to be a driver again.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      I don’t see myself buying anything but, if they still make them, a Challenger or, if GM takes their meds and becomes able to build a sanely designed one, A Camaro. But the Camaro has to have a usable trunk or hatchback, and it has to stop looking like the horror show it is now for me to even think about it. I just can’t bring myself to buy a Ford, a brand I’ve hated forever basically. My dad’s horrible T-Birds and a friend’s turd Nustangs soured me on them early. But if the Mustang was the only V8 2 door car out there I could afford, I would probably buy one. I’ve driven a friend’s Mustang GT many times and I like it as a driver, but I’m not crazy about the looks of it. Same goes double for the Camaro. Awfully nice to drive, but ugly as hell inside and out. If you can, get the Mustang, it will make you smile. My Challenger does every time I drive it.

      • 0 avatar
        jdowmiller

        A few hours after that post, I went and grabbed an Ingot Silver 6 speed GT. I’m thoroughly enjoying it. I’ve never owned a V8 before and it’s the first manual I’ve had since I sold my Miata a decade ago. Since that time it’s just been a series of family vehicles. It’s so refreshing to be in an actual *car* again. The exhaust note is wonderful. I try and keep it down in the neighborhood but it’s hard not to just let it ring out in 2nd gear. I was worried about transporting my three kids but have done it a few times already and they think it’s hilarious. The only challenge is having to help the two little girls in the back get out. It’s no big deal. My 14 year old son is already 5’ 10” and sits up front. Most of his friends are still kinda small so they had no trouble riding in back when I gave them all a ride. When they get bigger it might be a problem though. I’m going to go ahead and sell the Corolla and daily drive the GT. I live in Nashville and there are only a few snowstorms a year here. We’ll see how it goes.


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