By on October 4, 2019

Image: Ford

Ford Motor Company may have sidelined thousands of 2020 Ford Explorers and Lincoln Aviators due to hazy manufacturing issues, but it seems many vehicles slipped through the quality dragnet and into the hands of consumers.

You saw a eyebrow-raising walkaround of a dealer-fresh Aviator here the other week. Owners, however, get to slip behind the wheel and, in some cases, experience a bewildering array of symptoms.

For the sake of both the brand and buyers wishing to spend their hard-earned money on traditional American luxury, let’s hope the 2020 Corsair arriving this fall side-steps the quality issues plaguing the Aviator.

As detailed by the Detroit Free Press, consumer complaints are piling up, including gripes aired by, well, Consumer Reports. The publication recently took possession of a store-bought Aviator, only to see the thing go HAL 9000.

“When you get in, the speedometer and tachometer kind of goes berserk,” said Jake Fisher, CR‘s  director of auto testing. “While driving, all of a sudden the digital gauge cluster seems to be having huge problems. For the first couple of miles, it’s hard to see what you’re doing.”

Good, perhaps, for a motorist attempting to explain away their speeding to a state trooper, but hardly the image Lincoln wants to project to prospective customers. The company wants the Aviator to attract the attention of cross-shoppers, luring premium buyers away from import brands while retaining Lincoln’s customer base. And, while some rivals’ tech decisions (Lexus’ touchpad controller, for one) might turn off buyers, Lincoln’s competitors aren’t suffering from reports of quality issues.

The problems plaguing CR‘s Aviator, Fisher said, seem to stem from buggy software — something automakers should ensure is free of gremlins before owners take to the road.

One customer who chose the Aviator now regrets it. Glencoe, Illinois’ Laurel Spencer told Freep last month that her month-old vehicle has given her so many problems, she’d like to be rid of it. The problems aren’t minor, either.

“It wasn’t more than 24 hours since I drove it off the lot that I had my first problem — a leaky sunroof,” she said. “A week or so later, it was seat belts that didn’t work, and now it has been in the shop for nearly a week for computer malfunctions which had my crash detection set off when driving on a quiet road. The parking brake came on while driving, and a major transmission fault alarm went off. When they were fixing it, the seat controls went.”

Image: Lincoln

One of the two recalls issued for the Aviator involved seats, but not the problem Spancer describes. Shortly after its introduction, Lincoln called back Aviators for rear-seat seatbacks that could give way in the event of a crash. A separate recall concerned a transmission that might not be in the gear you think it’s in, at least according to the gear position indicator.

While an earlier report detailed masses of Explorers and Aviators entering Ford’s Flat Rock Assembly via truck after leaving their Chicago Assembly birthplace, the automaker now claims shipments are heading straight to dealers from Chicago. However, sources say roughly 1,500 vehicles remain at Flat Rock.

Lincoln’s Aviator sales tally for the third quarter of 2019 amounted to 1,899 vehicles.

“As part of the launch of Lincoln Aviator, we were shipping vehicles to Flat Rock for additional quality checks and inspections,” Lincoln spokesperson Angie Kozleski told Freep. “This is a longstanding practice at Ford Motor Co. with all-new vehicles to ensure that our vehicles are the highest possible quality for customers and we are taking every necessary action to ensure that the Aviator is built with the levels of quality and craftsmanship that our luxury customers expect.”

While some owners may be pleased with their purchase, those who bought an apple with a bug in it soon took to Facebook to share their stories. One owner on the dedicated page reported his Aviator’s tranny slipping into neutral while pulling up to a red light. When the signal changed, a right-foot jab didn’t get the vehicle moving. Another owner complained of his infotainment screen going dark without warning or reason.

If these issues are the product of a bad early batch, and if Ford has ensured vehicles currently rolling out of Chicago are free of headaches, then it’s possible Lincoln will weather the storm of bad PR relatively unscathed. If buyers can’t be assured that the Aviator they’re thinking of buying won’t leave them on the phone with their dealer’s repair manager, however, a problem exists. The old-timer stigma Lincoln hoped to eliminate with its new crop of models could make way for an even more damaging one.

[Images: Lincoln Motor Company]

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95 Comments on “As Consumer Complaints Mount, Lincoln’s Aviator Appears Not Fully Baked...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    Jeez, how does trash like this get past quality control? Is there quality control?

    Someone must have told the Engineers to benchmark Audi and BMW, without specifying what they were benchmarking. Quality and reliability were not the correct answer.

    • 0 avatar
      Dawnrazor

      Feels like an ominous time warp back to 70s-80s levels of quality control.

      Seems as if they have problems with both assembly and engineering, which is probably a sign that this vehicle was rushed to market too quickly. It’s a shame because this issue has the capability of severely clipping their wings just as they seemed poised to really start flying; the intended market won’t tolerate this at all and will simply shrug and move on to (or stay with) MB/BMW/Audi/Lexus and the attendant much higher probability of consistent quality and fit/finish.

      • 0 avatar
        tomLU86

        This is the maturation of the Mullaly (brilliant SELF-PROMOTER–most CEOs are) cost-cutting mindset from Boeing (see 737) that Hackett is trying to build on to juice profits.

        My comment notwithstanding, the best chance for a defect-free car is when it is built CORRECTLY the first time, with the correct tools, by a worker who knows the job well and follows ALL the steps properly (that’s harder to do on a “loaded” job), using GOOD parts.

        The people ‘repairing’ these vehicles are not ASME mechanics. In the process of disassembling, replacing, and reassembling, they are unlikely to match the original design quality. There is a possibility that they will make an error as they re-assemble the car.

        Ford’s Focus/Fiesta automatics ruined otherwise good cars–they are the Chevy Vega of our time.

        If Hackett is smart, he will give all these cars to Ford employees in the Detroit area to drive and evaluate. Once they have 1,000 – 3,000 miles, he can sell them as used.

        THe beauty of the ‘almost new’ used car sale is, for the buyer, a big discount to new. For the carmaker, it’s being able to say “aw shucks, it’s not new, we don’t know where it’s been, sorry about your trouble. It is warranted though”.

        Or, he can sell them as new, and unlike the Vega, which took years for society to realize it was junk, thanks to the internet, only people living in caves will NOT know these cars are junk.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “This is the maturation of the Mullaly (brilliant SELF-PROMOTER–most CEOs are) cost-cutting mindset from Boeing (see 737) that Hackett is trying to build on to juice profits.”

          Absolutely nailed it.

          This is why Ford was incredibly short sighted (their usual) in ditching Fields. Fields wanted to delay the Explorer and MKExplorer. Hack job was put in place and he put a rush on it. And look at the results…

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Jeez, how does trash like this get past quality control? Is there quality control?”

      Because you have a CEO that wants to cut his way to profitability. Cutting quality, squeezing suppliers so tight, etc.

      Mulally did the exact same thing.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      This is what happens when everything is electronic. You can have hardware and software that work as designed in pre-production, but when mass production begins, just one or two components can make everything go haywire.

      It’s not the design, and it’s not the assembly, and it can work perfectly right after initial assembly, then go haywire in the real world. Short of being vigilant with the output of individual component makers and those who embed them into pre-assembly modules, there’s no way to anticipate the problems.

      Reliability will improve once the problems are identified, but this is stuff Ford buys, and doesn’t make itself. What incidents like this do, is ensure that cars with mechanical shifters, gas pedals, ignition switches, and gauges will be kept on the road thousands of miles longer by a certain skeptical segment of the public.

      • 0 avatar
        Len_A

        Not necessarily true. The digital dash started with the redesigned 2018 Navigator, as did the tablet style Sync 3 infotainment screen.. Also the 30 way adjustable massaging front seats and the piano key gear shifter. Same with the 10 speed transmission and how it interfaces with those shift buttons. Same with the second row console controls.

        So this is baffling in the extreme. These are all features that were fully baked features in 2018 – why the hell are they having issues now???? I know for a near certainty that they’re coming from the same vendors. So, again, why????

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Resurrect the Ford Death Watch, I say.

  • avatar
    Jon

    “(the problems) seem to stem from buggy software — something automakers should ensure is free of gremlins before owners take to the road”

    Welcome to the early 21st century; where the first 1-3 years of a new vehicle model is actually a beta test for manufacturers.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      Buggy software programmed by outsourced coders residing in India who work for pennies on the dollar and cannot even afford to own a car. Strangely, the 737MAX saga has the same roots. When will people ever learn that you get what you pay for?

      • 0 avatar
        Jon

        Since I regularly work with Chennai, usually i am inclined to agree with you. However, this time I’m not sure I do. I have never heard of Ford using programmers in Chennai or other parts of Asia as a resource.

        I suspect that these faults have their roots in the number and complexity of the systems mandated by government over-regulation and the self inflicted tech race. Ford engineers probably just did a poor job integrating these systems in their haste to get the product to market.

        Hence, let the slobbering, “gotta have it” consumer test it. Then debug.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’m inclined to agree with you as a developer.

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          But… it must be true… someone wrote it on the Internet!

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          Ford has a MASSIVE engineering and development center in India. Chennai, specifically. Its a massive complex and it is where much of their coding is done nowadays.

        • 0 avatar
          black_ice_so_nice

          Ford doesn’t develop software in India. I’m not sure they develop much of anything there lately. Their suppliers of automotive software certainly do, perhaps that could be related to all their job postings for in-house automotive software engineers on MY21+ vehicle programs that have suddenly appeared since the MY19 validation period closed. We may never know.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “(the problems) seem to stem from buggy software — something automakers should ensure is free of gremlins before owners take to the road”

      Welcome to the early 21st century; where the first 1-3 years of a new vehicle model is actually a beta test for manufacturers.”

      Don’t believe that lie. This is not a software issue.

      • 0 avatar
        Lokki

        It’s not a software issue? Well, in the sense it’s a bad management issue you’re correct, but the symptoms sure as heck seem like they arise from bad software to me.

        I would be curious to know if Ford did the coding in-house or farmed it out.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          What software caused the issues highlighted here:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2019/09/as-ford-grapples-with-explorer-and-aviator-issues-one-reader-doesnt-like-what-he-discovered/

      • 0 avatar
        Jon

        I’m no programmer or C++ guru but i do work on automation with a background in controller communication. From the symptoms described above, this sure seems like it is a software issue. But i didn’t create the problem system or have proprietary knowledge of it. For all i know, aliens from planet [email protected] could be hacking it.

        It not, what kind of problem do you think it is?

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          What software problems caused the issues highlighted here:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2019/09/as-ford-grapples-with-explorer-and-aviator-issues-one-reader-doesnt-like-what-he-discovered/

          • 0 avatar
            Jon

            Don’t know, don’t care. As previously stated “systems described above”. Ok. Maybe I should have specified “computer systems”.

            Read above and below the picture of the cloud with the pink missssst.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Nice….bury that head in the sand…

  • avatar
    ajla

    Stuff like this being picked up in CR and the mainstream press could be difficult to overcome even if the issues get sorted out.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Ford/Lincoln can’t build “premium” vehicles from the factory that are as reliable as Land Rovers/Range Rovers.

    Then, in an extraordinary (and incredibly inefficient and wasteful) process, these new factory LEMONS are shipped to Ford’s Flat Rock, Michigan facility in order to be de-lemonized by an army of quality control remdiators (Remediator should be the name for these instead of Aviator), to at least make them somewhat palatable.

    Even then, after being released after this 2nd wave of employees fixes all manner of problems, they are relentlessly problematic from the moment consumers paying ridiculous prices for them drive them off the Lincoln dealerships lots.

    Lincoln = AntiLexus

    • 0 avatar
      Stanley Steamer

      Do they disconnect the odometers when doing all that testing? It seems most of these problems show up while driving. If not I guess we’ll be seeing a lot of “certified Pre-owned” Lincolns on lots soon.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The odometers are electronic, like everything else. The software had to work with intial production components, or they wouldn’t have started mass assembly. Production components may not have been to spec, and that could cause software malfunctions.

        So many functions are compromised, based on the reports, that something went terribly wrong with the systems integration. that could be a hardware OR software problem. We’re all guessing and accusing, but we don’t have the information to troubleshoot problems like this in an online forum.

    • 0 avatar
      Mnemic

      “Ford/Lincoln can’t build “premium” vehicles from the factory that are as reliable as Land Rovers/Range Rovers.”

      Put down the crack pipe

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I know for fact GM did and probably still does the same thing with GMC, the “post fixing”. Not sure on the other divisions.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      DW I think Cadillac may have the crown for AntiLexus.

  • avatar

    Like I said, Chicago can’t build stuff properly. And Ford quality control generally seems lacking or absent in modern times.

    Sad.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      Corey Lewis

      Hey dare polka boy,

      Who da ya think made that old John Deere you’ld be riding.

      Chicago has a long proud history of manufacturing high quality products. Including WeatherTech which advertises on this website.
      You’re just pissed that Ford bypassed Canada.

  • avatar
    brettc

    This, along with the (now) widely known problem regarding the DPS6 transmissions should be a huge embarrassment for Ford. I feel bad for Laurel Spencer, she apparently spent $80K on a turd. A base Accent probably would have been a better purchase for her.

    Perhaps they need to replace their CEO with one that didn’t work in the office furniture industry. Cars are quite a bit more complex than filing cabinets and office chairs.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Lexus is the only luxury brand I trust.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      thelaine

      I’ve seen a few of the new Lexus UXes on the road.

      Not interested.

      • 0 avatar
        Secret Hi5

        While you may not be interested in one, you can still trust a Lexus.
        :D

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Agreed Peter G and Secret Hi5. Lexus styling is mostly bad. Nevertheless, if I’m spending luxury car money, I want quality. Reliability is a very important aspect of quality. When you pay a lot of money and stuff doesn’t work properly or keeps breaking down or mystifies the service department etc…you feel ripped off.

          It’s not just Ford. The Germans are notorious for this kind of crap, particularly with electronics. You have to be a mechanic or a masochist to buy and keep a German car. Lease only.

          Anyone can buy a lemon from any brand, but there is no question in my mind that Toyota and Honda have generally made the most reliable, long lasting and trouble-free cars in the world since the first Civic appeared on US shores. People who bought the little Japanese economy cars in the 1970’s became virtual cult members because the cars were so much better designed and built than the garbage cans on wheels that Detroit was selling in the same category.

          The argument that all cars are basically reliable now is, in my opinion, bull crap. Most brands, thanks to the Japanese competition, are much better than they ever were, and most brands have reliable individual models they can use as examples of highly-rated cars. But across the board, year after year, model after model, it is Toyota and Honda hands down.

          • 0 avatar
            Deontologist

            “All modern cars are about equally reliable” sounds like “all of my coworkers are equally intelligent and hard-working.”

            Both are false statements, but both are nice things to say when you are a car brand apologist, or if you are one of those lazy coworkers.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Agreed. And that is the exact context where I hear it stated.

          • 0 avatar
            MrIcky

            @thelaine- my anecdotal experience is that you’re wrong. 2 different toyotas with 2 different engine configurations both had premature head gasket failure. I won’t buy another.

            Toyota owners seem to give their cars a pass when they’re in the shop just chocking it up as ‘stuff happens’ but it’s good cuz it’s a Toyota, even when it’s in the shop as much as the neighbors buick. I just don’t get it.

            Glad you’re happy with yours though.

  • avatar

    Big oof.

    This seems to happen every time Chicago or Oakville get a new platform. 2006, 2012, 2018 in OAC. 2012, 2019 CAP.

    The B&B has short term memory.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Tres, nice to see you!

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I don’t think you can pin this on Chicago. If it was bolts or nuts not threaded on all the way, or not properly torqued, or parts not properly assembled, then sure (the leaky moonroof would fall into this category). But software issues with instruments, and strange behavior from the transmission? That’s from somewhere else.

      • 0 avatar

        Door fit, trim: Plant. Body fit to paint, doors off then door fit in final. Instrumentation issues: End of Line not catching bad connections or bad calibration (plant or program management team). Trans cal: all dearborn.

        If you’ve worked in either plant, you know.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Should have kept Hapeville open. Back in the day we always felt the Atlanta built Tauruses were screwed together better than the Chicago ones. Plus you had the 24 hour Dwarf Grill (Chic Fil A) there.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      IIRC: Oakville: CD3 Edge/MKX, D4 Flex/MKT, CD4 Edge/MKX; Chicago: D3 Taurus/MKS, D4 Explorer

      At least Ford had some experience elsewhere building the the other vehicles. This time around, the factory was gutted and rebuilt, the CD6 vehicles are new from the ground up. Even more potential for things to go wrong.

      • 0 avatar

        Plant retrofit along with personnel is the root issue. The money saved from not building a new plant is now a complete wash.

      • 0 avatar

        Oakville struggled in 2006, not so much 2012/13. I retract that. 2012’s U38X launch was timed after U502 in Chicago by about 4 months so each build phase used lessons learned from U502. Mostly the same platform just different character line upwards really. I can’t believe that was 7 years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        Richard Chen

        Workforce problems endemic to a site? Uh oh, no easy solutions there.

        The next Edge & MKX/Nautilus (Oakville again), and Mustang (WTF) are moving to CD6, but nothing else. We’ll see if this new flexible platform for a handful of vehicles works out in the long run.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Regrettable. I am rooting for Ford/Lincoln—I really want American manufacturers, and their workforce, to succeed. I hope these issues are remedied permanently, and immediately.

  • avatar
    chris724

    “seem to stem from buggy software — something automakers should ensure is free of gremlins before owners take to the road.”

    The buzzword spouting CEO is completely full of crap. Ford needs more engineering, and less green-washing BS.

  • avatar
    RSF

    This should have been a home run for Ford. What a shame. Hopefully they do the right thing for those that bought one of these early examples and let them exchange it for one built correctly. Ford looks even more stupid when they say “This is a longstanding practice at Ford Motor Co. with all-new vehicles to ensure that our vehicles are the highest possible quality for customers and we are taking every necessary action to ensure that the Aviator is built with the levels of quality and craftsmanship that our luxury customers expect.” I’ve been a Ford guy for the past 20 or so years, but this is getting hard to take…

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Your brand loyalty will never be rewarded.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I’m a long time Ford guy, but there is a reason my F150 is a purchase and my Fiesta ST is a lease. It’s been solid, but Ford at it’s heart is a truck company that gets a car right every now and then (OG Taurus, Panther, SVT blessed stuff, Mustang).

      But yes, brand loyalty has bitten me on many brands. Ford yes, but ask me about my wife’s second Hyundai. There won’t be a third. But on the plus side the frequent visits to the Hyundai dealer are right up there with shopping at Walmart after the bars close. At least Nissan was kind enough to screw it up on the first purchase so I wasn’t long-suffering.

      Anyway, the lesson…buy D3 trucks. Lease the rest if you must have it. These are CrossoverSUV things…they are all the same so just get the known quantity. If I want this sort of adventure I’d grab a Stelvio

  • avatar

    Bill Ford was warned about hiring the Hatchet man. Bill was negligent himself by hiring a CEO who was known to be incompetent. These quality issues are almost identical to what happened at Steelcase furniture. Several Steelcase employees have been on this site telling horror stories about Hackett’s reign at Steelcase. With Barra and Hackett in charge, Detroit is in for a wild and mostly unpleasant ride. It is amazing how much damage these two have caused in a relatively short time.

    • 0 avatar
      tomLU86

      Bill Ford has a secure fortune, even if Ford goes under.

      It’s a pride thing. Obviously, not much pride, since he hired a CEO of a desk-maker (who may not have known much about desks).

      When CEOs make as much as they do, they are legitimate targets in places like this for the shortcomings of their company’s products.

      • 0 avatar

        Bill Ford is an alarmist, who makes rash decisions and subsequently hires incompetent people like Hackett. I am so tired of looking at Bill Fords deer in the headlight facial expressions.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I think this Aviator is really cool.

    But my god it feels like Ford hasn’t been building cars for 116 years, or that Chicago Assembly hasn’t been building things for 95 years.

    This, honestly, is terrible, 10x so on Explorer that has to be the 2nd most important vehicle for Ford after the F-Series. And then add to it this Lincoln model has real, actual buzz about it, will probably draw in first-time Lincoln shoppers…and they have this.

    If these issues aren’t already fixed, I’d probably seriously suggest Ford put a stop-sale on the cars until they are right. Better to delay than put trash into the hands of customers. You don’t want this turning into another PowerShift disaster where suddenly there are hundreds of thousands of problem cars on the road and the costs are now even greater than if you just delayed the vehicle and did it right to begin with.

    It isn’t the errors so much, its how you deal with the errors that arise that matters to most customers. Get it right. Ford is capable of this.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “’As part of the launch of Lincoln Aviator, we were shipping vehicles to Flat Rock for additional quality checks and inspections,’ Lincoln spokesperson Angie Kozleski told Freep. ‘This is a longstanding practice at Ford Motor Co. with all-new vehicles to ensure that our vehicles are the highest possible quality for customers and we are taking every necessary action to ensure that the Aviator is built with the levels of quality and craftsmanship that our luxury customers expect.\'”

    Shipping vehicles from one assembly plant to another (in another state!) for rework is “a longstanding practice”? Hell no it isn’t!

    How could she spout such nonsense with a straight face?

    In the era of Facebook and other social media, bad news spreads like wildfire.
    They’d better fix these issues soon, or it’s RIP Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      She could be right. Have one assembly plant check on the QC of another plant’s initial output. That might be a dozen or so examples, ONCE, but not 1500 or more, with more on the way. THAT’S an attempt to zero in on a pattern of problems to identify who or what is causing them at the other plant.

      The first instance could be routine and a good practice to check a new model. the second should never be needed unless the problem is big, as this one is. Of course, she’s citing the first instance as standard practice, but ignoring the second for public relations purposes.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    This is crazy that Ford has blown the launch of what is likely it’s 2nd most important product (both Explorer/Aviator) after the F-150. It gives consumers zero confidence give the severity and number of defects that are occurring. I’d be hesitant to look at any of the new products Ford has out now or coming (Escape/Classic) until the demonstrate at least an average level of engineering/manufacturing/assembly quality control. I’ve also steered one friend away from the Aviator as a result of these issues.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    “It wasn’t more than 24 hours since I drove it off the lot that I had my first problem — a leaky sunroof,” she said. “A week or so later, it was seat belts that didn’t work, and now it has been in the shop for nearly a week for computer malfunctions which had my crash detection set off when driving on a quiet road. The parking brake came on while driving, and a major transmission fault alarm went off. When they were fixing it, the seat controls went.”

    OY!

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    I had issues with the electric seats in my BMW 7 series too, like the Lincoln. Except mine is a 1992, and I only paid 3000$ for it.

    I can’t imagine dropping more than $60k on a vehicle and having these issues, it’s completely unacceptable.

  • avatar
    readallover

    I forget, is this an Escape or an Explorer or an Edge…..?

  • avatar
    Vanillasludge

    Ford has used early adopters as prototype testers for many years. As a buyer of one of the first 1992 Panther Crown Vics I can tell you horror stories about the river of breakdowns that car suffered in its first 30k miles. Over $6k in warranty work done in that time and in 1992 money. In the two years I owned the car I never took a trip longer than 250 miles without some kind of failure.

    Like a sap I came back for more with the updated 2003 Town Car and was rewarded with a crazy number of dealer visits for everything from failed seat racks to rear axles to paint peeling off in sheets.

    My best advice to buyers is: Wait a year.

  • avatar
    redapple

    20 years ago, Ford was rated with near Honda quality in the auto mags. Since then,
    6.0 Powerstroke disaster.
    Current gen Fusion quality exorcism at Flat Rock (what 7 years ago)
    Fiesta, Focus DCT Tranny problems.
    And on and on.

    I m beginning to think they may be near worst in quality. DW says they have Land Rover quality. After the chuckle, the thought occurs. HE’S RIGHT.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Said this before – we all give Cadillac a ton of crap because the XT6 is so dull, but I don’t hear any “it’s a rolling turd” bad reviews about it.

    Ford better get this problem policed *right now.*

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    “The parking brake came on while driving”

    I’m pretty sure this won’t unintentionally happen in a vehicle with a cable-operated parking brake.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      They don’t make those anymore. When they did, they were actually called “emergency” brakes years ago. Now that they’re electronic parking brakes, they ARE the emergency.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhocking.

    Our X7 has been problem free for over a month now. We love it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Ford needs to fix this quick and not have this happen again otherwise bye bye Lincoln. Lincoln still has an opportunity to become a luxury leader but if they don’t fix this soon and make sure that all their vehicles are near perfect then they don’t deserve to survive. Quality should be the Number 1 priority and they need to add Lexus quality service.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    Maybe all that purple smoke Matt McConaughey was driving through in the Lincoln commercial was actually coming FROM the Aviator.

    I can’t wait for the Consumer Reports road test of this thing. It’s gonna be epic!

  • avatar
    AVT

    what I want to know is how much is this going to cost ford? Between warranty work/recalls they will be having on the vehicle, cost of shipping cars across states for additional assembly/inspection/quality fixes, that’s a lot of money to be pouring into a single vehicle model. When they downgraded Ford’s credit to essentially junk status last month I think, I was wondering what signals they were seeing that led to that decision. Now I’m wondering if they spoke to the engineers or a few UAW workers and got the story early. At the end of the day, Ford’s job is to make a profit. When you have screw ups like this that are probably costing the company many millions of dollars, those investors want answers. Especially if their dividen payout isn’t up to snuff. Someone should do an analysis on ford profits and see how much this is affecting them by the end of the year.

  • avatar

    This thread attracted all suspect trolls, probably laid off former FMC employees. So I had to skip half of comments.

    But “If Hackett is smart” is asking for too much. And welcome to Silicon Valley mindset, yes I am looking at you Mr.Hackett.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    Everyone was underwhelmed by the Cadillac XT6 when it came out (since it was nothing more than a fancy Chevy Traverse). But at least it hasn’t had these kinds of problems. The XT6 doesn’t look so bad now.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Ford needs a car guy as the CEO and less meddling by the Ford family. Ford’s problems are not as much cutting cars as a lack of emphasis on quality. If you want your truck customers to buy your other products especially your crossovers, suvs, and luxury brand then you need to assure that your quality is better. Quality should be just as good on your less expensive offerings because you want those customers to eventually buy your more expensive products. It is sad when Hyundai and Kia have a better reputation for quality than Ford, GM, and FCA. If a Lincoln product cannot even measure up to the quality of a Hyundai and Kia then all hope is lost and if Ford cannot improve Lincoln’s quality issues then Lincoln needs to be sold to a company that can or Ford needs to shut the brand down like they did with Mercury–there is no use wasting any more funds on future product development if the quality is not there.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I grew up in a Ford family. My dad (and therefore I) loved Fords, and my first car and first new car were Fords. Some of my fondest automotive memories include Ford vehicles, so it’s kind of tough for me to jump on the anti-Ford bandwagon.

    I’ve mostly purchased GM products over the last 20+ years and have had good experiences, generally. I’m not posting this to p!ss on Fords or Ford owners, but I stopped buying the cars about 20 years ago (it’s what caused me to buy GMs) after a couple of my Ford products were absolute disasters in terms of quality and service.

    I know folks who have purchased both new and used Ford products in the last several years and have had nothing but problems with them. This seems like a recurring issue, that whatever attracts you to them in the first place, eventually the problems reveal themselves.

    Of course, I hesitate to say too much, as I haven’t bought a new Ford product in over 20 years. I haven’t experienced any of these issues first-hand, either… Hopefully, they can find their way out of the woods and get the ship righted, because the competition isn’t going to let up.

  • avatar
    micko4472

    The chickens are coming home to roost. (1) Bad QC, (2) software not
    thoroughly tested, (3) the cost-cutting, profit-driven mentality
    so thoroughly ingrained in stock companies, and perhaps (4) unhappy
    union employees.

    Much as I would like to, I will not buy a new vehicle. My old one
    (2009 Xterra) is minimally computer-cotrolled by today’s standards
    and I’m quite happy about that. Although I would like a backup camera.

  • avatar
    geo

    This story comes as no surprise. Ford is utterly incapable of building a modern, clean-sheet design that isn’t utter garbage. I understand that their internal hierarchy is becoming based on group identity rather than skill and experience, so Ford’s days in its present form are numbered. I predict that they will one day produce only the F-150, and perhaps import some smaller trucks from the third-world.

    My dad used to say that American cars were junk because all of the best engineers went to work for the US military.

    “When you can design doors for a tank, and for more money, why would you work for GM or Ford?”

    I’m not sure about this theory, but it could be a part of it. The inability of domestic manufacturers to design a competent unibody vehicle is one of the great mysteries of life.

  • avatar
    chef4u

    Just took delivery on our new Aviator! We have had two MKZ’s, one a hybrid 2014 and the other a V6 2016. Both were built in Mexico and near flawless. It took alot for me to buy these after years of Honda Accords (great cars). We have had two BMW’S, an X5 (horrible) and we still have a 1997 Z3 (superb). Our family members are with or have been with Ford, GM, Chrysler and VW. We have had them all.
    The Aviator design and ride is amazing. I will keep you posted on the quality as we go!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    My wife’s last Ford was a good car except it went through several air conditioning compressors (2000 Taurus). I don’t think it is as much the fault of the engineers and designers as it is the bean counters. Too many constraints are put on the actual engineers to design a quality product. Everything is about earnings per share and getting cheaper and cheaper parts and less quality control to reduce costs. Ford, GM, and FCA need to go back to W Edward Deming’s 14 Points of Management. https://deming.org/explore/fourteen-points

  • avatar
    Len_A

    I posted this in reply to another post above, but this bears repeating:

    The digital dash started with the redesigned 2018 Navigator, as did the tablet style Sync 3 infotainment screen.. Also the 30 way adjustable massaging front seats and the piano key gear shifter. Same with the 10 speed transmission and how it interfaces with those shift buttons. Same with the second row console controls.

    So this is baffling in the extreme. These are all features that were fully baked features in 2018 – why the hell are they having issues now???? I know for a near certainty that they’re coming from the same vendors. So, again, why????

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    In other news, my neighbor has a golden retriever that can’t play the piano.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    That retriever did bark a lot at the new Lincolns.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    They kicked Fields to the curb, who was well on his way to saving Lincoln, and this is the result.

    Now you have massive QA/QC issues AND a stock stuck at $9. At least with Fields still at the helm, you might have a low stock price, but I doubt he would have let the Explorer/Aviator come to market with these known issues.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Sounds like my co-workers new 2019 Ram. He tells me if it isn’t one thing it’s another. So far it has had it’s transmission replaced, the body control module has been updated twice, the speedometer goes berserk of it’s own accord, the engine has an intermittent tick when fully warmed up that to my ear sounds like a sticking lifter and the transmission still thumps and bangs into gear at lower speeds. He has the extra cost eTorque setup which he regrets buying. Mileage has never crested 20 even on pure highway drives going 70. Despite the fact that vehicles are more reliable overall there are still an alarming number with hard to solve intermittent problems like these. So far knock on wood my last 4 Impala’s have been dead reliable with only normal maintenance and wear items even with near 200K on the earlier ones. Ditto mom’s 2008.

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