By on September 27, 2019

Tesla owners who purchased Full Self-Driving Capability or Enhanced Autopilot from the company will soon be able to enjoy new self-driving functions. Software Version 10.0 is officially out for the Model X, S, and 3 — adding new driver assistance features, navigation settings, multimedia libraries (music, movies, video games), security options, and a new karaoke mode.

Since the enhanced Autopilot features are the most notable by far, let’s begin there. Tesla’s new “Smart Summon” feature enables the vehicle to navigate through a parking lot sans driver, so long as the car is within sight. “It’s the perfect feature to use if you have an overflowing shopping cart, are dealing with a fussy child, or simply don’t want to walk to your car through the rain,” Tesla said in its Version 10 announcement.

However, the automaker noted that customers remain responsible for their vehicle’s actions and should be aware of the car and its surroundings at all times. If you didn’t purchase Enhanced Autopilot or Full Self-Driving Capability, then there’s nothing to worry about. Smart Summon is only available if you’ve already bought into one of Tesla’s advanced driving suites. Version 10.0 does come with updates for everyone, though.

The 0ver-the-air push also delivers software that allows drivers to connect to Netflix, Hulu and YouTube accounts via the massive center console — the function is wisely limited to stints where the vehicle is parked. Tesla has similarly expanded music offerings by incorporating Spotify Premium. Slacker Radio and TuneIn will also remain available.

Karaoke, which Tesla calls “Car-aoke,” is just what it sounds like. The company promises a massive library of songs (in multiple languages) to be taken advantage of during road trips.

Some customers will also notice that Tesla has expanded its video game library. Preview materials showed passengers playing Studio MDHR’s universally praised Cuphead. Tesla said customers could make use of USB controllers to play single-player or co-op modes of the game’s first level.

 

The automaker previously hid video games (and other digital distractions) in a drop-down tab; they’ve moved to the main menu bar. While most of them are vintage arcade games (Missile Command, Centipede, Asteroids) or titles previously designed for smartphones, the addition of Cuphead is a major step forward. The game is modern, visually impressive, and much too complicated to play using touch controls or the vehicle’s steering wheel.

New navigation features also arrive with Version 10.0. Rather than entering a specific destination, customers can now select “I’m Feeling Lucky” and “I’m Feeling Hungry” to have the car recommend a nearby restaurant or point of interest. While someone feeling truly lucky is likely to strike out on their own without any help from satellites, we could see “I’m Feeling Hungry” settling dining-related disputes with one’s spouse.

Apparently, a round of testing resulted in recommendations for “hole-in-the-wall restaurants, gourmet meals, national parks, city landmarks and more.” Maps have also been updated to allow passengers to sort locales by distance, more easily initiate phone calls, check a business’ ratings, and browse nearby areas.

Dashcam and Sentry Mode have been updated to automatically manage video clips by splitting stored data into separate folders. Another quality of life update is “Joe Mode,” which reduces the volume for select alerts to avoid disturbing sleeping passengers. Version 10.0 also updates the Tesla app to allow for garage door controls (via HomeLink), new vehicle defrost options, and remotely controlling windows.

[Image: Tesla Motors]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

30 Comments on “Tesla Software Version 10.0 Delivers (Potentially Alarming) New Autopilot Feature, Music, Movies, Video Games...”


  • avatar
    Stanley Steamer

    The updated Snooze Mode seems to be gaining favor with Tesla drivers.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “…customers remain responsible for their vehicle’s actions and should be aware of the car and its surroundings at all times”

    How can a customer do this if they’re not in the car?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @sce: How can a customer do this if they’re not in the car?

      Just like flying a drone (which is basically what you are doing). You have to be within sight of it. Not sure if they have FPV capability on the Model 3, but that would help. Personally, I’d never use it in a crowded active parking lot like a supermarket. Maybe at work where there is very little activity in the parking lot and in the indoor garages. Although, the problem there is that usually I’m plugged in and there’s no rain or cold weather in the garages to warrant using it anyway.

      It’s probably one of those features you show off once or twice to your friends, but never really use. Kind of like the fart mode on the seats.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        No, what does a Tesla weigh again and how much horsepower does it pack? Unless we are talking military drones these two aren’t even on the same planet.

        I’m not saying this is terrible but come on man…5000+ pounds of 0-60in 2 seconds versus like what…a pound of plastic?

        The fact is stuff happens. I remember when the Blackhawk was fielded flying over power lines would cause it to nose down. Then there is the Max 8. Point is the stakes are much higher here than your iPhone controlled drone and sometimes designers miss stuff. Yes, the rest of the public has a stake here. I would hope my municipal government at least takes steps to hold the “operators” criminally and civilly liable in the same manner they do me should I get lit and go for a spin.

        Yes, ideally it should be quite safe. Then again ideally 737 max 8’s shouldn’t fly themselves into the ground in spite of the pilots efforts. Remind me, what is the cost of a Tesla vs a 737? Yeah, I’m slightly concerned

  • avatar
    Lokki

    According to this article new Teslas are coming from the factory with flash capability.

    https://elkodaily.com/news/local/truck-hauling-electric-vehicles-catches-fire-on-i–near/article_312d08e4-1250-56a0-bf5f-7d7eadb8c378.html

  • avatar
    Fliggin_De_Fluge

    When one of these inevitably mows down a parent and their child in a parking lot Tesla’s gonna lose their lunch.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Genius; the first place they roll out a “Look Ma! No Driver!” function is a situation in which the car has the *worst* visibility (like Mom pushing baby out from between a pair of minivans who isn’t going to hear the silent electric car coming.)

    Tesla’s going to get their regulatory ass whipped the first time one of these so much as skins somebody’s knee.

    It’s not like we can count on Tesla drivers to use the feature responsibly after all.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      Which of these is more likely to cause a crash/injury to “baby-stroler/expecting mother/mystery Messiah” in a parking lot;

      A) A Tesla crawling through a parking lot at 5mph (that’s the top speed allowed) with all it’s sensors at full alert and over-cautious AI (seriously, it drives like scared grandma)

      B) A driver that’s fumbling around trying to find their vape-pen as they speed through the lot at 20mph, swerving around trying to avoid speed bumps with the music blasting.

      Now what I DO anticipate after having used this tech is that Teslas may occasionally get ‘flustered’ or ‘stuck’ in a confusing situations and refuse to move causing traffic issues/annoyance in the lot. This will be especially true at first while the bugs are worked out.

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        Autopilot has, in the past, steered Teslas into a concrete wall, the side of a semi-trailer, and the rear of a fire truck, none of which are exactly subtle obstacles.

        Forgive me if I have doubts about their abilities to compensate for inattentive not-drivers in a crowded parking lot.

        But now that you mention it, when it *does* get stuck (and you are correct that it will), that’s going to be all sorts of fun while it jams up traffic while the driver comes and rescues it. Especially if it’s stuck in a place where it’s hard to get in the driver’s door.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    Seriously… Caraoke.

    I really don’t want to be labelled as a Tesla hater but sometimes they just make it so damn easy.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      And didn’t Musk say that 100,000, and even 110,000 deliveries a month were in sight?

      Makes me wonder if this is yet another shell game like the one Fiatsler played on the industry:

      https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2019/09/27/securities-and-exchange-commission-said-fiat-chrysler-automobiles-misled-investors/3792134002/

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        > And didn’t Musk say that 100,000, and even 110,000 deliveries a month were in sight?

        A quarter. 400k per year.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @HighDesertcat: I haven’t found references to Musk saying 100,000 to 110,000 deliveries per month for 2019. The letter to share holders said 400k per year and later he stated that he was trying for 500k Model 3s in 2019.

        FCA was misleading on delivery numbers. Missing on goals is something different. Lots of companies set goals and often they don’t meet them. Things happen. They’re actually doing pretty good on numbers. Better than I expected. 100k electric cars (mostly sedans) in a quarter is pretty good. Some of them are exports to China. How many companies are sending US-made cars to China? Look at Europe. They’re doing well in Europe too. Subsidized you say? That’s a good thing if European countries are subsidizing American made cars. I’m not complaining.

        Tesla is an upstart American company that’s fighting hard to be successful. They’re exporting cars around the world. They’re challenging dealers and not even allowed to directly sell in some states. Some people cheer companies like that and hope they succeed. Others, well…

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        vvk and mcs, thank you — I stand corrected. I streamed that segment in-flight and caught that snippet. I could have sworn they said ‘per month’.

        mcs, on “FCA was misleading on delivery numbers”, some would say that they were misleading on other things as well.

        https://www.yahoo.com/news/next-gen-jeep-grand-cherokee-152000245.html

        This was supposed to happen in 2016, and was delayed without any explanation, leaving many a GC repeat buyer in the lurch.

        I wonder if this is really going to happen.

        And re Tesla, I’m not a fan of EVs but I am seriously considering buying a Rivian pickup truck as my local DD. Had Tesla come out with a pickup truck instead of sedans, I suspect it could be my DD today.

  • avatar

    Can you keep Tesla within your sight using Skype? E.g. you are in Sam Jose and Tesla is parked in San Francisco.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    …and once again proving, just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. What could possibly go wrong..?

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    So here is the issue.
    Tesla is baiting their customers to commit crimes. It is telling them they can do something, then kinda saying, well, you shouldn’t really.
    And in rain!?
    Really?
    What gets my goat is I am not allowed to say NO to an driver-less car in the parking lot with me and the family.
    These people can be beta testers all they want, but not on public roads or in private parking lots.
    Terrible

  • avatar
    redliner

    As someone who has actual hands-on experience with these new features, I can say that they are amazing. SCARY… But amazing!

    I noticed that most of the comments above are somewhat negative. Why? A USA company, with USA assembly producing superlative electric cars, sales direct to consumers, and is continually innovating.

    Is Tesla perfect? Of course not! …but neither is (insert your favorite brand).

    A young company that makes a product that was considered “impossible” by the establishment just a few short years ago is something to be cheered. Respectfully, the stone throwing just comes off as jealousy because “those rich people” have nice toys. Not everything is black or white, there are nuances to this topic.

    • 0 avatar
      Fliggin_De_Fluge

      “Respectfully, the stone throwing just comes off as jealousy because “those rich people” have nice toys. Not everything is black or white, there are nuances to this topic.”
      Nice job contradicting yourself there.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Respectfully, the stone throwing just comes off as jealousy because ‘those rich people’ have nice toys.”

      A Model 3 with the “self-driving” capability is $45K (before any EV incentives). That isn’t Mirage cash, but it is also a long way from unobtainable “rich people” money.
      Personally, I react poorly to stories on AV tech because I’m afraid it will lead to me being outlawed from driving in the future.

      • 0 avatar
        redliner

        “I react poorly to stories on AV tech because I’m afraid it will lead to me being outlawed from driving in the future”

        This is the constructive dialog we should be having. How can we achieve the safety of an autonomous commuter fleet while still being responsive to the desires of the enthusiast community? Perhaps autonomy can be mandated at peak commuter times when traffic is dense and efficiency and throughput of the road network are prioritized, but still allowing manual driving on back-roads and during non-peak hours.

        I made the “rich people toy” comments from my own experiences. I am not wealthy. I live in a large city where Teslas are just another car, but I regularly travel hundreds of miles to rural areas. I am surprised how many people are anti EVs generally and Tesla’s specifically while having absolutely no experience with them. It cost my business nothing extra to run a few model Xs compared to the cost of a few large crossovers when you factor total cost of ownership.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      No buddy…rich envy is theposts that happen when someone posts an article about a 60k dollar pickup. 45,000 dollar Teslas?!That is what poor people that want to look rich drive. If they had real money they’d buy an S or an X. The 3 is for posers.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Yeah I said it. Don’t worry…youll get even on April 15th when I pony up for a chunk of your Tesla 3. Yep, said that too. To quote the [email protected] that was posting truck stereotypes a while back “I call em’ like I see em”. If you got a 3, you’re welcome. Maybe one day you can get an S.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      – Why? A USA company, with USA assembly producing superlative electric cars, sales direct to consumers, and is continually innovating.

      Are you saying that Tesla should be given a free pass from criticism out of patriotism? I think not. I’d say the same thing no matter which country came out with a car that thought this was a good idea.

      – Respectfully, the stone throwing just comes off as jealousy because “those rich people” have nice toys. Not everything is black or white, there are nuances to this topic.

      It’s *bleep-ing* hilarious where you’d accuse the critics of all being people that can’t afford a Tesla in one sentence (with no evidence whatsoever, nor anybody even mentioning the cost of the thing) and then call for nuance in the next.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @sirwired: I don’t think they should get a free pass because they’re a US company. They should get every bit of criticism they deserve. It’s the only way they can improve. At the same time, they should be recognized for their accomplishments as well.

        How terrible of a feature is autopilot through a parking lot? There are a lot of dangerous features in cars. Like 600 or 700 hp in a rear wheel drive car. Should we limit everyone to 125 hp CVT AWD cars because everything else is kind of dangerous? What about autopilots dumb cousin, cruise control. You think that people don’t fall asleep with that or stare and text on their phones while using it? It happens. Loud radios – they drown out emergency vehicles.

        I’ve seen far worse in a parking lot than a Tesla crawling along at a walking pace with someone hopefully monitoring it visually. Even if they aren’t, that system should be good at slow speeds. I have a lot of experience with collision avoidance systems and while I can go on at length with criticisms of current systems, Teslas should be able to handle walking speed just fine. There are far worse things going on in parking lots and the Tesla might even be a bit better than a human e.g. backing out.

        youtube.com/watch?v=PUHCTKy1W1U

  • avatar
    Vanillasludge

    Cars should not be driving without people in them. We aren’t there yet.

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    Karaoke should be mandated as engaged at all times in “autopilot mode”, as in your car will safely park itself if you stop singing for more than 15 seconds.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    New autopilot features…..it will launch you into many more types of vehicles not just fire trucks.

    Seriously this is all the proof any reasonable person needs to see that these silly electric vehicles are just fashion accessories and are not anywhere near legitimate competition for proper ICE vehicles.

    Anyone watching The Fast Lane Car on YouTube will quickly realize how much of a joke electric cars, specifically Tesla’s are to live with.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I am not necessarily for this but it’s happening. Someone has to be the first. Both Tesla and owners will be held responsible for accidents, no escaping that.

    However, I’ll just point out that there are literally millions of elderly drivers out there daily that should not be behind the wheel of a shopping cart let alone a car. Everyone of us has seen the elderly pull a hail Mary reverse out of a parking space. Just hope for the best because my neck and peripheral vision no longer work.

    There are worse things in every parking lot in the country. I will point the finger at vehicles with ridiculously tall ride heights as being far more pedestrian unfriendly in a parking lot situation.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • dal20402: I agree they often want test drives and do judge “how a car drives,” but I think that is more...
  • R Henry: Overall, a decent exterior shape, though I find her to be a bit wide in the hips.
  • Arthur Dailey: @Hummer: The Canada-US Free Trade Agreement was negotiated in 1986 and came into effect in 1987. I...
  • FreedMike: Per the spec sheet, the turbo’s torque will kick in at 1500 rpm, versus 4000 for the NA engine. This...
  • EGSE: Friends of mine with Dodge minivans had the Ultradrive units crap out around 70k-ish miles. A real black eye...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States