By on September 4, 2019

Image: Porsche AG

Perhaps it’s both. After four long years of teasing, Porsche pulled the wraps off its Taycan electric car on Wednesday, lifting the sheet at a glitzy affair overlooking Niagara Falls.

The four-door EV is sleek, sensuous, fast, expensive, and without a doubt Tesla’s worst nightmare. Why mention the chief rival of Porsche’s new offering? Well, because Tesla’s Model S 100D came first, and it’s still a significant money-maker for the hard-pressed automaker. But Porsche is Porsche — status comes standard with each purchase, and the Taycan brings that desirable badge into the growing realm of hot electrics.

So, what does the Taycan offer?

Launching in two top-trim guises, Taycan Turbo and Turbo S (there’s obviously no actual turbocharger), the Taycan draws upon a 93.4 kWh battery pack that gives the 5,100-plus-pound car a lower center of gravity than the revered Porsche 911.

Image: Porsche AG

The Turbo is good for 670 horsepower, every pony of which comes online with launch control engaged, while the Turbo S puts out 750 hp in the same manner. Dual motor and all-wheel drive is the only way to go with these two brutes, helping the models rocket to 60 miles per hour in 2.6 and 3 seconds, respectively. While both models top out at 161 mph, attempting to reach such speeds won’t do anything good for your battery range or your driver’s license.

Unlike most other electrics, Porsche makes use of a two-speed transmission in the Taycan. The gearbox aims to maximize acceleration while still ensuring easy and efficient high-speed cruising.

Porsche engineers went to town on the Taycan’s slippery shape, ensuring a coefficient of drag as low as 0.22 for the Turbo model (0.25 for Turbo S), while other members of the development pit crew ensured rapid recharging via the car’s novel 800-volt system. Assuming optimum charging conditions and the fastest plug-in on the market (270 kW), a Taycan can charge from 5 to 80 percent in 22.5 minutes, Porsche claims. There’s still the option of plugging into a household outlet.

Image: Porsche AG

Technological prowess aside, Porsche knew putting the car first and passengers second wouldn’t bode well for its reputation. Thus, engineers built “foot garages” into the rear-seat footwells — dents in the battery pack, essentially — to ensure backseat passengers received a decent amount of legroom. A 10.9-inch infotainment screen and optional passenger screen take up part of the Taycan’s minimalist dash, which reduces the number of buttons, dials, and switches for a cleaner, more modern look.

Cargo space resides both front and rear, with a 2.8 cubic-foot cubby up front and a more generous 12.9 cubic-foot area out back.

Hidden within each wheel well is a hydraulic brake system Porsche claims you’ll seldom need to use. The car’s regenerative capacity can handle up to 90 percent of the vehicle’s braking, meaning Taycan owners might only make use of that left pedal in sudden-stop situations. Also hidden in those wells is a standard adaptive air suspension, with Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control Sport electromechanical roll stabilization system and Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus available for spendthrift buyers.

Image: Porsche AG

Four drive modes span the gamut between balls-out power and energy conservation. Wheel size is an appropriately large 20 inches on the Turbo and 21 inches on the Turbo S.

While the Taycan is undoubtedly an impressive green machine, it doesn’t come cheap. The Taycan Turbo starts north of $150k ($150,900, to be precise), well above the MSRP of a Model S, while the Turbo S can’t be had below $185,000. The automaker aims to release lesser versions in the future, with rear-drive and a sub-$100k price tempting buyers of lesser means. When and if those models appear remains to be seen.

Range also remains to be seen; Porsche didn’t have any EPA numbers on hand for today’s launch, though the automaker’s concurrent European event saw a figure of 280 miles mentioned (keep in mind, these are Euro figures that’ll surely be pared back in the U.S.). That’s significantly less that the range of a top-shelf Tesla. Expect to hear firm numbers as the model’s late 2019 on-sale date draws closer.

Image: Porsche AG

[Images: Porsche AG]

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71 Comments on “Porsche Taycan – EV Halo Car, or Gut Punch for Tesla?...”


  • avatar
    retrocrank

    How soon will it be before one of the elected goons decides this car is unfair to those other e-car builders, and slaps a heavy penalty on each Taycan to provide an equal opportunity for the others in this marketplace.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Penalty? Porsche already applied it themselves, its about twice the price of a Telsa!

      Also “turbo” for a car with no forced induction? UGH!

      FYI my brother has a hybrid Cayenne, on his last tank of gas he managed 1,018 miles of mixed driving, getting an amazing 63.6 mph. It managed nearly 600 miles on electric power alone during his commute in Miami

      • 0 avatar
        ravenuer

        The Porsche website says it gets 27 miles in EV mode. Perhaps your brother didn’t tell you he has a 600 mile long extension cord?

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          He charges it at work and home. The numbers above are based on when he finally ran out of dino juice. I assume it runs out of electrons every day and thus needs to some gas for a few miles to complete the trip.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        “Turbo” lost its original meaning at least by the 1980s, when every beige box computer case had a “turbo” button that would tell the motherboard to overclock itself.

        • 0 avatar
          Hydromatic

          On most of those machines, the “turbo” button actually downclocked the CPU to an extent to improve compatibility with certain programs.

          Calling it the “slo-mo” button would have been cooler, but I don’t think it would have done any favors for the marketing dept.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Actually, turbo mode on CPUs never went away:

            https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000007359/processors/intel-core-processors.html

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Bwahahahahahahahahahaha!!!

      What, pray tell, is up with those things on the front below each headlight that look like the same things on the rear of an SE-level Camry?! I hope those are some sort of functional vents!

      I like the interior — dash is very early 911.

      Why “Turbo” in the trim levels, if there’s not one?!

      I swear Europe has jumped the shark, and they’re going to drag us all down with them!

  • avatar
    Jon

    Question: will the brake lights engage if the brake pedal is not depressed?

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      Hmmm, interesting question.

    • 0 avatar
      theBrandler

      No, it does not have one pedal driving, not even a little. Porsche found that letting the car coast was the most efficient thing to do, so it does no regen at all unless you step on the brake. Then it will use regen up to some maximum amount before engaging the calipers.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I’m sure they do.

      My Ioniq EV does this. It seems to be fitted with an accelerometer that triggers the brake lights under moderate to heavy regen. There are some steep hills in my area that the car will actually slow down while descending, so brake lights are an essential safety feature.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Looks like this car won’t have a one-pedal mode. But all the EVs that have such a mode with which I’m familiar (Teslas, Leafs, Bolts, Konas) will light up the brake lights when the car exceeds a certain threshold of deceleration.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Taycan Turbo? I’ll hold out for the Taycan 4-cam Carrera Targa.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    It’s high time we dispense with this whole “green cred” thing when it comes to cars like this (or any Tesla, for that matter) – I’m sure some folks buy them to “save the world,” but they’re in the minority. This isn’t some hair-shirt super-Prius – it’s (at least to my eyes) sexy, and high-tech, and VERY fast. That, not being able to rock some Mother Gaia Savior-mobile, is what sells Tesla, and that’s what will sell this car too.

    • 0 avatar
      duncanator

      I kind of feel that if they really want to be green, they should keep their existing vehicles for 20 years. After that, get a Corolla Hybrid.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        …or push HARD for the development of alternative energy in general, and new tech like fusion power in particular. As it stands, there’s a decent argument to be made that an electric car is only as “green” as the electricity used to power it is.

        Personally, I’d be all in on committing hundreds of billions of tax money to a Manhattan Project to produce a workable (and profitable) fusion reactor. Whoever invents *that* is going to have a truly revolutionary piece of tech on his hands…and if it’s an individual, he’s going to make John D. Rockefeller look like a pauper.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      My wife knows someone who has a Telsa. They cross shopped it against Audi, BMW and Benz, all brands they previously owned and enjoyed. They just wanted a sleek, fast, tech loaded, luxury vehicle and Telsa gave them this plus no more fuel stops. Since gas stations no longer offer full service, not having to fill your car with nasty, smelly fuel adds to the luxury “white glove” experience. My wife would love an electric car for this exact reason, it may only take 5 minutes to refuel but in heat and humidity of a Florida summer she’d rather not deal with this task. I bet many in cold climates feel the same way during icy days when battling negative wind chills.

      • 0 avatar
        Robotdawn

        If they ever get an electric car down to the price of a normal car I’d totally be on board with one for my commute car. Filling up at Sam’s every week is a pain I would gladly forego.
        But I’m not paying $10k extra for that privilege. And no the gas doesn’t pay for the difference, except over 8 years, which is a long time to keep an electric car with all the unknowns that would entail.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          The people that I know that were early adopters of an EV use them for running around town, and locally.

          But the EV is not their only vehicle. They have at least one other ICE vehicle, more often two or three other ICE vehicles for the long haul.

          Driving from El Paso, TX, to San Diego, CA can take as long as 13 hours driving time in an ICE vehicle, with pee brakes and refueling stops.

          It would take longer in a BEV.

          But I would seriously consider a Rivian BEV pickup truck for running around within its range limit, if it is within my financial allocation for a vehicle.

          That would be ~$50K for a full-size half-ton pickup truck like a Tundra, RAM, F150, in that order.

          • 0 avatar
            SkiD666

            Punched in El Paso to San Diego into abetterrouteplanner.com for a Tesla Model S 100D and got the following:
            Driving Time: 11:18
            Charging Time: 1:44
            Number of charging stops: 6
            Total Time: 13:02

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Why the six charging stops in 724 miles? Is that starting out without a charge? I’ve made that trip averaging better than 80 mph including a fuel stop.

          • 0 avatar
            SkiD666

            Basically it is more efficient to charge only the bottom half the battery (15-20 min) then to charge the battery to full (60-90 min).

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            So Tesla makes expensive cars for people whose time is of no value? That’s pretty niche.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        > it may only take 5 minutes to refuel but in heat and humidity of a
        > Florida summer she’d rather not deal with this task.

        I just refueled my last remaining ICE car for the first time in about two months. I don’t know how people tolerate it. It was a disgusting experience. I almost passed out from the fumes.

        Never used to notice it before. Used to gas up this car every single day. Cringe.

    • 0 avatar
      Oreguy

      This. I bought my Model 3 because I was intrigued by the technology and enjoy the hell out of driving it every day.

      I’m also not so naive to expect extra credit for “saving the world”, because yes… electricity has to be generated somewhere, somehow.

      Now that kind of thinking might put me squarely in the minority of a lot of EV owners. I don’t care.

      Pretty nice not having to stop for gas or deal with anything other than washer fluid on a regular basis.

      • 0 avatar
        Oreguy

        Six charging stops? Doesn’t add up.

        On our road trip this summer, we left Ritzville Washington (west of Spokane) at 90% and drove straight to Sheridan Wyoming. 3 charge stops, averaging about 40 min. each. 730 miles, just over 13 hours total for that leg, if I recall.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          That’s like saying, “I’m only going to fill my gas tank 3/4 full so I can make another refueling stop sooner.”

          It takes all sorts of justification to get around the long recharging times and the limited range of BEVs.

          But, hey, whatever makes ‘m happy.

          If I ever get to buy that Rivian EV pickup, I won’t be taking it on long trips beyond the radius of its battery range. I’ll have an ICE vehicle for that.

          But I may install a 7000-watt Honda Inverter AC generator in its bed — just for grins.

          • 0 avatar
            MrIcky

            When I have to go someplace that would be out of an electric vehicles range, that’s when I usually need a pick up.

            On longer trips I’m usually camping, picking something up, taking a day trip to MTB, towing a trailer, etc. Maybe it’s just me, but it seems like a Rivian is the least useful version of an EV. Converted to a van it would be good for an in town delivery fleet. Converted to an SUVish thing it would be good for delivering lots of children around town. But for trucky things it leaves me scratching my head.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Ditto for us needing a pickup for longer range.

            At one time I used my half-ton pickup truck for the long-distance trips across the US, especially my 4-dr Tundra. Loved it.

            Then we started using my wife’s Sequoia and put a cargo-carrier on the hitch for extra gas, etc.

            Right now we have no vehicles because our traveling schedule takes us out of the country for extended periods.

            But once we settle down again, after we get too old to travel comfortably, I’m pretty sure we’ll buy another Sequoia for the wife, and maybe a Rivian for me.

            That should cover all the bases.

  • avatar
    duncanator

    I think the thing that sets Tesla apart from a vehicle like this is the Supercharging network that Tesla already has. Their parts availability is certain a ding against Tesla, but in everyday use, I’d be more likely to lease a Tesla. Price being the biggest factor for a Tesla compared to a Porsche, but the charging network has to be right up there too.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      Interesting fact. While 70% of Porsches are bought new rather than lease 84% of Teslas are bought new rather than leased.

      https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a15347641/the-most-commonly-leased-car-brands-in-america-and-the-most-commonly-purchased/

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Probably because 1) Tesla only just recently began leasing cars, and b) they have no captive lease lender. That article was written before they began leasing.

        And as I understand it, the resale on Teslas may not be all that hot.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    A mistake has been made in stating the “…Tesla’s Model S 100D came first, and it’s still a significant money-maker for the hard-pressed automaker.” Tesla never made a profit until the M3 came out, and then it has only been for 1 quarter, so I don’t think you can accurately say the Model S is a significant money maker. Instead it is more accurate to say the S is significant money loser, which the Taycan is also likely to be, but unlike Tesla, Porsche has very profitable Cayennes, Macans, and 911s to offset the EV losses.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      At this point they are making money on the S, the reason they didn’t make money overall when it was the only car was they were still in start up mode and throwing all of their, and other people’s, money at developing the model 3. Now that the 3 is here the company still isn’t really making money overall, yes they have now had a profitable quarter thanks to the surge of people sliding under the wire before the tax credit was cut the first time.

      Meanwhile this Porsche is likely to be profitable on its own, thanks of course to that high base price, the fact they had a parts bin to sort through for some of the parts and that they actually have plants in place to build it in.

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    Looks pretty nice, except the lack of physical buttons might get annoying. And smudgy.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    An EV that looks like a sports car, performs amazingly AND has a normal interior? Sign me up!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    As late as April, the starting price on the Taycan was to be $85k; now it’s nearly double that:

    https://www.automobilemag.com/news/electric-vehicle-range-ev-cars-mileage-best-worst/

    Where’s the TTAC outrage, and the pejorative names for Porsche CEO Oliver Blume, like ‘snake oil salesman’, ‘Ponzi schemer’, and ‘liar’?

    • 0 avatar
      Oreguy

      Now that’s some good humor!

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Stay tuned for constant EV sticker shock. Look at how awful the value on the tiny-battery-equipped Honda EV is. Teslas look like incredible values as their prices fall with their demand and other EVs hit the market with worse price/range relationships.

      The reality of EVs is that the materials involved dictate the opposite of economies of scale. The marginal cost of each battery is higher than the last. Tesla needs to keep moving their metal at any cost in the hope of keeping their valuation alive on turnover. I don’t think they have any end game other than abject failure, but they’ll put it off as long as they can by dumping cars and claiming massive R&D expenses for as many next big things as they can dream up and lie to the unquestioning media about.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        The cost per kWh of battery power has been falling every year and is projected to continue doing so. I know, I know, horseless carriages will never overtake these horse-and-buggies you so adore.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Why do you think the 37kWh Honda city car is too expensive to sell in the US? Why do you suppose the Taycan’s price jumped 70% in the last few months? Child slaves in cobalt mines aren’t about to get any cheaper. Raping the earth for Lithium isn’t about to take less force.

          BTW, you might want to educate yourself before you assert that EVs are superseding ICE cars on merit. EVs were actually a baby step between horses and ICE cars. They were overtaken in about 1905 and then wiped off the map in 1919 when electric starting of ICE cars was perfected. You should probably start campaigning for clean, renewable whale oil as our next ‘evolutionary’ energy source, it would be about as smart as bringing back Victorian era EV follies.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      I wasn’t planning to buy the Porsche, so the price doesn’t matter.

      I just doubled my household income, so Tesla prices really matter to me now.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    280 miles of Euro range is more like 240 miles EPA range – pretty terrible for 93 kWh, and in line with the Jaguar I-Pace.

    No Supercharging network, high price, low volume, and limited dealer support – what’s not to like?

    At least it can really run at the Nürburgring, unlike the Model S.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Gas Porsche Turbos get sh!tty fuel economy. Would you expect an electric one to be any different?

      No one who can afford one of these ever drives a sedan long distances, so the charging network won’t matter. The buyers have an X7 or Range Rover for that.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      “At least it can really run at the Nürburgring, unlike the Model S.”

      That’s true, but I think the Model 3 more of an alternative to the Taycan and people have been running them on the ring. For the money that you save, you can throw on Model 3 aftermarket parts like carbon ceramic brakes and suspension. Maybe even throw in a repaint and panel alignments.

      For $185k, I’d rather pick up a Model 3, then save the extra money to buy a roadster as a second car when that comes out.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Yes, Tesla learned their Model S Nürburgring lesson when developing the Model 3 Performance.

        I’m guessing you’ve cooled to the Taycan in favor of the 3 someday? I’ll admit to being a bit shocked at the Taycan’s price.

        Looks like VAG is loathe to lose money on the thing. Wait till the pricing comes out on the Buzz and friends – it’ll be impossible for them to price their mass-market EVs like Golfs.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    I’d call this a bunt single on Porsche’s part. No surprise it’s attractive, and expensive as heck.

    But it’s no threat to Tesla, which sells decent EVs for 1/5 the price of this Taycan.

    I actually rented a Standard Range Plus Model 3 for a week recently while my DD was in the shop. For $41K sticker price, it was actually a nice car. Good acceleration, sharp turn in, and ample storage space. The main things keeping me from considering one are the space-alien stying, stark interior, poor reward visibility, and noisy suspension. And the fact that every 10th car in the Bay Area is now a Tesla.

  • avatar
    pinkslip

    “meaning Taycan owners might only make use of that left pedal in sudden-stop situations”

    AFAIK, the Taycan does not have one-foot driving. The driver will need to use the left pedal whenever he or she wants to slow the car down. What Porsche means is that the braking force from the regen system will handle most stopping needs, with the hydraulic system there only for aggressive deceleration.

  • avatar
    TimK

    That two-speed tranny is curious. My guess is they needed to limit the motor RPMs and this was an easy way to do it. But the slippage has to cost them 5% to 10% in range — ouch. Hard to believe that vaunted Porsche couldn’t engineer a better drive train at this lofty price point. Turbo in a EV? LOL that’s just dumb.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Why would their transmission slip? Surely there’s no need for a torque converter with all the e-drive torque for launch. Isn’t it a simple single planetary that runs in direct in high range?

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      Actually two speed transmissions increase range. They are starting to come into the transit bus market for just that reason.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        Two-speed transmissions were used in transit buses from about 1940 until about 1980. Or do you mean two-speed rear axles? Either way, nothing new.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Didn’t Tesla expend a great deal of effort attempting to make a two speed transmission work prior to launching their Lotus-based roadster? They eventually gave up. Was it because two speeds don’t offer anything, or were they just too incompetent to produce a functioning two-speed transmission? I guess it is a goof thing that subsidies created a market for their century-obsolete single-speed EVs.

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            Everybody uses a 1-speed transmission in their EV – BMW, Ford, Tesla, Nissan, GM, Hyundai, Kia… everybody.

            Porsche’s use of a 2-speed enables them to beat the Model S and the Model 3P at the Nürburgring, which is very important to US buyers.

            In daily use, a 2-speed offers no benefits, but a lot more complication. That box probably adds $5-10k to the Taycan’s price.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Are you really saying that two-ton-plus Teslas are lousy track cars because they don’t accelerate quickly enough? How does a two-speed transmission contribute to the Taycan getting around a track? Is straight line speed the reason Teslas aren’t fast for more than a few minutes?

          • 0 avatar
            pragmatic

            SCE to AUX writes

            “Everybody uses a 1-speed transmission in their EV – BMW, Ford, Tesla, Nissan, GM, Hyundai, Kia… everybody.”

            Not every body. As I’ve stated in the Battery-Electric Bus world OEMs are moving to two speed transmissions to get better range. Also in the Class 8 truck world Eaton is offering a two speed for use in battery electric HD trucks again to increase range.

            Now I know the next post will be that the Porsche has a larger battery and lower range than the Tesla so the transmission is a failure. Maybe but maybe Porsche is being conservative in how they push the batteries and while the pack has a high rating they are limiting depth of discharge to increase the battery life. I’d be interested in seeing a w-hr per mile number for the Taycan and the Tesla on the EPA urban and highway drive cycles.

      • 0 avatar
        pragmatic

        I’m talking about two speeds transmissions being supplied with newer battery electric transit buses from Proterra used to increase efficiency and operating range.

        • 0 avatar
          retrocrank

          How? Takes the same energy to accelerate a vehicle (including “accelerating” against friction to maintain steady speed) no matter what the gearing. Battery energy. Reducing frictional losses in the electric motors by slowing them using a friction-adding transmission? How’s that work?

          • 0 avatar
            pragmatic

            Electic motor efficiency varies slightly with speed and load. Since both the transit bus world and the HD truck world (Eaton is offering 2 speed transmissions for battery-electric trucks) are both moving to two speed transmissions for range I have to assume it works otherwise they would save the money.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Every single motor has a peak efficiency point, where the Watts of mechanical force is the greatest percentage of the electrical watts entering it. It also has a definite upper end to its rpm whether by its basic electrical design or that causes it to fail.

            So yeah 2sp transmissions do make sense if you want to maximize accleration, top speed and range and not favor one or two of them.

          • 0 avatar
            retrocrank

            thanks. Didn’t know that applied to electric motors. Given the basic physics of a rotational electric motor though I can see how it makes sense.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Wouldn’t let me edit.

            I meant to add that there are ways to not increase the friction by adding a second gear. Even if they use a planetary stage, which is not very efficient, by using it in a reduction orientation once it is in direct drive there is no significant additional friction.

  • avatar

    Meh, give me Borland Turbo C any day over that Porsche. More fun. Good times, good times, when we were young.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    They called it ‘turbo,’ I refuse to acknowledge its existence.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I am encouraged to see that the two-speed transmission for BEV’s is technically possible, since other manufacturers planned to introduce this and ended up canceling it.

    Note to EV critics: While you’ve been mocking Tesla, Porsche has been working to catch up with them.

    What Porsche knows that many enthusiasts don’t: At some point, enough range is enough.

    Goofy things (which won’t affect the success of this vehicle at all):
    – The ‘turbo’ name
    – The clear plastic charging cover (which presumably mimics a clear engine cover, but which will yellow over time)
    – Porsche has joined the touchscreen world (for better and for worse)

    What Porsche knows that most mainstream OEM’s do not know: Lower price is not always preferable.


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