Audi Still Under Threat of New Dieselgate Fines

audi still under threat of new dieselgate fines

Dieselgate never dies. Germany’s Federal Motor Transport Authority (Kraftfahrt-Bundesamt) has informed Audi that it will be subjected to additional fines if it fails to meet upcoming deadlines for retrofitting manipulated diesel models with updated software.

Reports from Bild am Sonntag, later confirmed by Reuters, claim the regulatory authority issued three letters to the automaker stipulating that it had until September 26th to replace the software in emissions-cheating V6 and V8 TDI engines (originally certified as EU6 compliant) lest it be fined 25,000 euros (about $27,500) per vehicle. While fines are only applicable to cars still carrying illicit software, the transport ministry estimated some 127,000 Audi vehicles qualified in Europe last year. There were originally around 850,000.

Retrofitting includes little more than updating software code on the affected Audi models and removing any lines that allowed vehicles to emit significantly higher emissions on-road than during testing conditions — thus restoring their legality. Vehicles that are not fixed by the September deadline may never receive approval, Kraftfahrt-Bundesamt has warned. Germany is also considering forcing Audi to buy back older EU4 diesel models, though no official decision has yet been made. However, those models may need substantially more work than a simple software update.

Audi has stated it’s already made quite a bit of headway with the retrofitting of EU6 models and should be able to adhere to the deadline set by the German transport ministry. It asked that Kraftfahrt-Bundesamt not withdraw approvals on vehicles still requiring a fix.

[Image: Audi]

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  • Jon Jon on Sep 17, 2019

    Would someone explain why these cars have not been "retrofitted"? Are owners refusing to do software flashes or are they still unaware of the problem? Are folks unable to register the vehicles if they have not been retrofitted? No angry eco-soldier tone here, just curious how the whole retrofit process works and how the vehicles are made illegal or legal.

    • See 1 previous
    • Tosh Tosh on Sep 19, 2019

      A8 V8 TDI makes a great getaway car, so obviously lots will have disappeared.

  • Dal20402 Dal20402 on Sep 18, 2019

    Is there any confirmation that the new software is actually compliant? It seems like the Occam's razor explanation for what we've seen in the last few years is that diesel engines just can't meet Euro 5 and later standards in real-world use, and that all reported compliance with those standards is fraudulent.

  • FreedMike Back in the '70s, the one thing keeping consumers from buying more Datsuns was styling - these guys were bringing over some of the ugliest product imaginable. Remember the F10? As hard as I try to blot that rolling aberration from my memory, it comes back. So the name change to Nissan made sense, and happened right as they started bringing over good-looking product (like the Maxima that will be featured in this series). They made a pretty clean break.
  • Flowerplough Liability - Autonomous vehicles must be programmed to make life-ending decisions, and who wants to risk that? Hit the moose or dive into the steep grassy ditch? Ram the sudden pile up that is occurring mere feet in front of the bumper or scan the oncoming lane and swing left? Ram the rogue machine that suddenly swung into my lane, head on, or hop up onto the sidewalk and maybe bump a pedestrian? With no driver involved, Ford/Volkswagen or GM or whomever will bear full responsibility and, in America, be ambulance-chaser sued into bankruptcy and extinction in well under a decade. Or maybe the yuge corporations will get special, good-faith, immunity laws, nation-wide? Yeah, that's the ticket.
  • FreedMike It's not that consumers wouldn't want this tech in theory - I think they would. Honestly, the idea of a car that can take over the truly tedious driving stuff that drives me bonkers - like sitting in traffic - appeals to me. But there's no way I'd put my property and my life in the hands of tech that's clearly not ready for prime time, and neither would the majority of other drivers. If they want this tech to sell, they need to get it right.
  • TitaniumZ Of course they are starting to "sour" on the idea. That's what happens when cars start to drive better than people. Humanpilots mostly suck and make bad decisions.
  • Inside Looking Out Why not buy Bronco and call it Defender? Who will notice?
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