By on September 26, 2019

Ford

If you have less than one thousand foot-pounds of torque, are you even driving a truck? That seems to be the message Ford tried to convey during its spec reveal of the 2020 Super Duty line on Thursday.

In an event held on the sidelines of the State Fair of Texas, where attendees view all things large and powerful with the same rapturous admiration as a Ziplock bag of pills discovered at Burning Man, Ford detailed the output and towing capability of its revamped, third-generation 6.7-liter Power Stroke diesel V8. A diesel, Ford was proud to relay, that tops Ram’s torquiest Cummins by 50 lb-ft.

Yes, 1,050 lb-ft, besting the mill’s previous twist by 115 lb-ft. Horsepower is also up, from last year’s 450 hp to 475.

In comparison, Ram’s new-for-2019 Cummins comes in two flavors. The base diesel inline-six makes 370 hp and 850 lb-ft, while, for extra coinage on top of the existing diesel markup, buyers can gain a 400 hp/1,000 lb-ft version.

ford

As you well know, Ford didn’t just bring an upgraded diesel to its revamped Super Duty line. It also developed a 7.3-liter pushrod V8 for diesel dissenters, with that mill making 430 hp and 475 lb-ft. Ram’s 6.4-liter V8, standard in 2019 HD pickups, generates 410 hp and 429 lb-ft. Ouch.

The Blue Oval mill also mates its grunt to a 10-speed automatic, versus Ram’s beefed-up Aisin six-speed. The lesser of the two Cummins gets the older Aisin auto.

It may not have much interest in courting low-end car buyers, but Ford’s willing to pull out all the stops when it comes to maintaining truck supremacy. What Ford’s now claiming is a sweep of all the brawny accolades foisted on heavy-duty pickups: best gas and diesel horsepower and torque, best payload capacity, and best towing capacity (conventional, gooseneck, and fifth-wheel). Ram enjoyed the top podium on several of those scores for a single year.

ford

About that towing. While few owners will need the extra hundred or so pounds separating the max specs of two automakers jousting for the top spot, bragging rights are big in the truck segment. Inches and pounds and everything else matter for marketing.

The 2020 Super Duty line maxes out at 37,000 pounds of towing capacity, whereas Ram manages 35,100 lbs as a ceiling. Payload for the Ford line tops out at 7,850 pounds when chosen with the returning 6.2-liter gas V8 (385 hp, 430 lb-ft). The Ram HD? 7,680 lbs.

For those towing a fifth-wheel trailer, 32,500 pounds is the most weight Super Duty owners can hang off the rear. Conventional towing maxes out at 24,200 lbs, versus Ram’s 23,000.

To get that maximum conventional towing capacity, you’ll need to opt for the diesel crew cab F-450 in either 4.2 or 4×4 guise. Top payload comes with the regular cab, long box F-350 4×2 dually and 6.2-liter V8. And, for those with a gooseneck or fifth-wheel setup, the diesel F-450 regular cab 4×2 is your tugging champion.

ford

With the aim of providing an alternative to Ram’s Power Wagon, Ford has a Tremor off-road package waiting for SRW 4×4 buyers, offering maximum conventional towing of up to 15,000 pounds, 21,900 pounds for gooseneck trailers when optioned with the diesel, and a 4,210-pound max payload capacity when equipped with the 7.3-liter.

The 2020 Super Duty line begins its journey to dealers late this year.

[Images: Ford]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

56 Comments on “2020 Ford Super Duty Trounces Ram’s Torque and Towing, Rubs Competitor’s Face in the Dirt...”


  • avatar
    NoID

    I hear girth is more important.

    What were we talking about again?

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Gross overkill.

  • avatar
    deanst

    So Ford buyers have the most (the least?) to compensate for?

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The chrome grille looks like a radiator, and that Blue Oval looks like it’s big as a football. I do like the letter stamping on the tailgate.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Here we go. Cue the “Nobody needs this” crowd. But yeah, you “need” a Tesla that will hit 60 in 2 seconds. You don’t like trucks. We get it, you’ve scored your points. Many people do so move along.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      This, it’s like compensating by saying others are compensating, it’s such a gross revolving door of senselessness that can be applied to almost any vehicle. I’m not sure what these people fear so much about trucks but it’s funny to watch.
      Doesn’t matter what one needs, it’s called capitalism, what does one want?

      Why people want to whine and cry so much about what others want makes no sense. Full-size trucks reign the sales chart so going against that is stupid. Personally I would prefer to see some torque and power wars on the gas engines as that’s more my segment. But these diesels are aspirational to me, large truck with comfortable amounts of power. Go anywhere do anything, and resale like nothing else.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Agreed, Hummer. There is a certain type of person who is intimidated and made fearful by trucks and their drivers and “compensates” with derision. It’s the same for people who like to put down great athletes or good-looking people as shallow or dumb. They are just intimidated, so they compensate.

        In the meantime, I feel like we are in the golden age of pickups and I welcome the ferocious competition in all segments. Thank you, frackers and also your moms – motherfrackers. Plentiful oil means plentiful pickups of all types, sizes, uses and trims. Life is good.

      • 0 avatar
        roloboto

        “Why people want to whine and cry so much about what others want makes no sense.”

        Because they can’t afford, but want, what other people have.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Who said anything about a two-second Tesla?

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Will be great for those times I need to get a sheet of drywall or a 2×4 back home from the store. Should even be able to make it up the big hill by my house with that sort of power even carrying said sheet of drywall or 2×4.

    Seriously though, what is the fuel economy on one of these unladen? I’d be curious to see what 37000 lbs looks like for reference, that sounds insane. Or what 0-60 would be in this configuration. Maybe those numbers haven’t been released yet.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Yes, but that sheet of drywall fits in my minivan with the hatch closed. I marvel at trucks with 6′ beds hauling 8′ material, all exposed to the wind and weather.

      But a truck like this would be great for trailering.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      12-14 mpg combined for the 6.2L, probably similar for the 7.3.

      16-18 mpg combined for the diesel.

      0-60 is about 8 seconds for either engine (the greater power of the diesel is offset by its higher weight and torque management in lower gears)

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        “12-14 mpg combined for the 6.2L, probably similar for the 7.3”

        So just think of it as a vastly more capable Tundra likely with even greater resale.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        That’s what I’m seeing with my 6.2 F350 unloaded, 12-14mpg. Pulling 16k at 60 – 65mph I’m seeing 8mpg. FWIW, my 7.3 diesel was 18-20mpg unloaded, 12mpg pulling the same 16k trailer. The gasser does as well or a bit better than the old diesel pulling and the fuel cost of towing is pretty much a wash.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I think the amount of people shelling out for 3/4 ton and larger trucks that don’t need the capability is pretty small. Most people that buy these do real work…even the high trim models…they just want to work comfortably

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Then why are roughly 75% of all pickups sold powered by V6 engines and smaller–and nearly 50% of Fords the N/A V6?

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Vulpine, I have no earthly idea where you came up with that stat, but it’s not even close to accurate.

          Here is a breakdown of F150 sales in 2017-18, showing approximately 10% for the 3.3 N/A V6.

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2017/08/v8-market-share-just-quarter-ford-f150-lineup/

          Obviously 100% of Super Dutys sold have 8 cylinders.

          GM sales are heavily weighted toward the V8s and they don’t offer a 6 in their HDs.

          Ram Cummins is 6 cylinders but not a V6

          I can’t find stats but I’d guess the Hemi outsells the Pentastar in the Ram 1500. Even if not, its nothing close to 75%.

          Midsize pickups have V6s, yes, but their combined sales are a rounding error compared to 1/2 ton and HD trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @jack4x: I will acknowledge that my stat is outdated but while it may be the N/A V6 is only 10% by now, the majority of F-150 sales still tend to be the V6 model than the V8 and I don’t know what percentage the turbo-four carries today.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            We’re not talking minivan V6s. When they come very close to or exceed the power levels (especially torque) of the V8 option, and can actually increase rated payload/towing over the V8, what’s your point?

            Although it’s only the longtime pickup owners that will stick to V8s ’til the very end and refuse to bend. I’ve done over a million miles in gas V8s (yeah I’m over 50) and not one blown V8 engine.

            Yes I’ve worn some out (from very high miles), but not even a single blown head-gasket or any kind internal issue, timing chain, oil pump, rings, valves or otherwise.

            My experience isn’t unique by any means, but I can totally see how typical pickup buyers would be swayed by V6 specs/MPG/abilities on paper and advertising.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Nice trucks, to be sure. It’s hard for me to believe a civilian can pilot 37,000 lbs down the road without holding a CDL. Is this true?

    • 0 avatar
      DedBull

      My Pennsylvania drivers license says 26,000 lbs and under. My father in law who hauls with a Ram 5500 has a CDL and appropriate DOT numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      If Johnny Law truly wants to get picky, anybody with a pickup/SUV and trailer that is registered over a 10,001 Gross Combination Weight Rating needs to follow CDL rules. The level of enforcement tends to follow areas of greater population density.

      Civilians are generally left alone since it is easier to pick on all the commercial accounts. If grandpa causes a serious accident with injuries with his dually and 5th-wheel RV weighing in at 20K+, you can be sure that those laws will be enforced.

    • 0 avatar
      ptschett

      Could be a big travel trailer I guess. Or a farmer operating under the farm exemption from CDLs within 150 miles of the farm.

  • avatar
    Jean-Pierre Sarti

    I am really hoping the 7.3 liter Gasser makes it to the non commercial trucks at some point in the future.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    meanwhile, over at Fast Lane, the guys got 40 mpg w/ the new RAM Ecodiesel, while towing

    2020 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel: You Won’t Believe the MPG We Got Towing & Empty

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Also in the “test”, they admit obviously there’s no way it can get 40 MPG. Or anywhere near that. And it was empty, not “towing” at the time.

      It could’ve been bad pump calibration, but stay tuned for them to run the MPG test again. They got 12.4 MPG while towing (truck’s computer said “12.1”) and diesels aren’t affected by towing (vs empty) that wildly.

      The truck said “30 MPG” empty, which is still outstanding, despite 2wd and extended cab.

  • avatar
    Jon

    The problem with these trucks is not that someone needs them. Its none of my business what other people need. The problem with these trucks is that they are sacrificing long term reliability for king of the hill titles. These trucks will eventually price themselves out of existence. Pigs get fat. Hogs get slaughtered.

    I (and many like me) do not want a truck with 800+ lbft that can tow 20k+ lbs. I am not looking to race up I-xx at 80mph with a 18,000lb trailer. I want an OVER-BUILT truck with 550-650 lbft that can RELIABLY tow my 6000lb and 12000lb trailers up I-xx at 68mph well past 250,000 miles.

    I doubt these new HD trucks can perform this task without racking up repair bills less than half their MSRP before they reach 200k.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      You sound like a good candidate for the gasoline offerings.

      • 0 avatar
        Jon

        I am excited for the new larger gas engine offerings (GM and Ford). I still think they are a little underpowered for what i need but they are a much better alternative than the new HD diesels.

        Ive been watching the GM 6.6L (gas) closely. I am waiting for the eight or ten speed auto be be offered with this engine in a crew cab LS or WT model.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      I agree with you. Our ’17 Ram 2500 would have been perfectly fine with a Cummins rated at 250-hp and 550-lbs./ft. for towing a 25-ft. trailer of similar weights as yours. Our option was lower spec 350-hp/660-lbs./ft. rating with the 6-spd manual. As a result, it needs new tires at 15,000. Finding an older Tier-2 truck would be great.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      There is absolutely no doubt that the new 7.3L/10 speed will tow a 12K trailer up a grade at 68 mph. The 6.2L with 4.30 gears can do that right now.

      Reliability remains to be seen but I wouldn’t bet against a new understressed iron block pushrod V8 explicitly designed for long term reliability.

  • avatar
    dwford

    So basically the new Super Duty can haul almost as much as a semi with a 53′ trailer.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Linda Zhang has an all-electric prototype that can crush these (peak) torque figures from zero RPM.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Yay pencil whipping numbers power and capability numbers!

    But does the interior still suck?

  • avatar
    macmcmacmac

    It’s amazing any work got done with those 5.0 smogger motored trucks in the 80s.

    This article failed to mention if the Ford told the Ram to step outside. It must have if it rubbed its face in the dirt I suppose.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    1,051, Bob.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    It’s past time to remove the recreational exemption from the CDL requirement and make drivers of these things get some training beyond “the red thing with eight sides means stop.”

    Towing 15 tons is serious business not just for the driver, but for everyone else on the road. And that’s especially true when power-drunk owners trying to p!ss on the other brand insist on towing at 95 mph, as they do all too often on Western interstates.

    Failing that, let’s have a non-defeatable 70 mph limiter that kicks in whenever there is a connection to the trailer harness.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Fordson: Well, no comment as to how her late husband is now looking up from hell, so I guess this is restrained. And...
  • Tummy: I think part of it is related to the fantastic year in the stock market of 2019 and for the last several...
  • Fordson: “While the braintrust here at TTAC tend to gravitate towards the Honda Civic’s mid-range Si model and...
  • tsoden: A couple instances where Tom-Tom, was completely brainless. In New Brunswick, the GPS was directing us to...
  • jh26036: Hard to believe this body style has been around for basically ten years. Felt like a blink of an eye.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States