By on August 2, 2019

It’s tough to gauge the state of car sales in America on a monthly basis these days. The entirety of the Detroit Three have moved to a quarterly reporting system, leaving a gap the size of a ‘70s land yacht in this month’s numbers.

Still, we press on. The remaining manufacturers are still reporting each month — for now — which gives us at least a partial picture as to the lay of the land. Many brands enjoyed a month-over-month increase in July but the year-to-date results are a bit of a mixed bag.

With three very large holes in the data, we’ve dispensed with the usual charting. Yell at us in the comments if you want it back.

The larger of the non-Detroit manufacturers, Honda and Toyota, were roughly flat compared to the same time last year. Honda’s volume went up about 3,000 units to 128,537 while Toyota dealt about 800 more machines to ring up 184,179 sales. So far this year, Honda is off by about a single percentage point while Toyota is down about three.

Hyundai had a stellar (pun intended) July, raking in more than 6,000 extra sales compared to last July. That works out to a 12.1 percent increase, if you’re wondering. The large-and-in-charge Palisade counted for 4,464 of that new volume, putting an exclamation point on the importance of this new SUV for Hyundai. This positive result builds on successes the brand realized earlier in the year, pushing gains through the first seven months of 2019 to 3.1 percent (roughly 12,000 extra units).

Mazda, for reasons known only to wizards and clairvoyants, continues its slide into the doldrums. Last month’s performance fell by about 900 vehicles compared to last July, bringing its year-to-date sales to an alarming 13.9 percent below 2018 levels. It’s a difference on 26,202 units, to be exact. The fall is baffling, especially since Mazdas are reliably the most stylish in their class and frequently the most sporty.

Subaru continues its relentless march northward, posting its best ever July on its way to racking up 92 consecutive months of yearly, month-over-month growth. That’s a lot of all-wheel drive systems. In terms of specific models, it was also the best July on record for Outback, while Ascent continues to do extremely well. It certainly doesn’t seem like the three-row machine is cannibalizing its own family as some had feared.

Talking heads are still expecting total sales in 2019 to rest south of 17 million units once the dust settles. For those who care, there were 25 selling days last month, one fewer than July 2018.

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61 Comments on “OEMs Report July’s Auto Sales … ‘cept for Detroit...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    Mazdas are fine, I like the CX9 Signature, and they probably should have higher sales. That said, outside of the MX5, I find their internet reputation for “style & sport” that’s superior to all others to be overblown in reality.

    Even if I’m incorrect about that, I don’t think style and sport are that high on the shopping list in 2019.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I like the excel tables, please include them if possible.

    Nissan?

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Yes, some one at GM figured out that the less said about monthly sales the better, since that might adversely impact stock price.

    If they were optimistic about their performance in the marketplace, why hide?

    GM did have a very good quarter, so even though Ram is outselling Silverado, GM made a lot of money. And that’s why the Detroit Three are there…to make money.

    Ford, reeling from the auto trans debacle, decided to “me too” GM. And now, apparently, so had FCA. Perhaps they all will.

    As for Mazda, they are the sportiest, yet either they are running away from their strength (fun to drive) by making manual transmissions less available and affordable, or the market is running away from them. That’s too bad–for all of us who like to drive, where we like Mazda or not.

    In a ‘good’ economy, the Fed cut interest rates. Will this flow to Joe/Jill consumer, and get them to buy more cars?

    Car’s are $36k average today. Before inflation, they were probably $6-7k average in 1980. That’s about $18-21k. Say what you will about how much better cars are (they are), but the average person’s take home wages have not risen 50% since 1980.

    • 0 avatar
      redgolf

      tomLU86 – in 1980 the year my plant shut down ( Dana ) we were making $10/hr. UAW wages, in 2011 the year I retired wages were $28 and change ( GM ) except for new hires, I think some are making around $18 hr. on a yearly scale raise, about the same at the Nissan plant although their older work force was always a few dollars less than the big three that being said there’s a lot of workers still at $10 – $15/hr making it almost impossible to support a family let alone buy a new car!

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      tomUL86

      GM’s strategy is working. Right now people are talking about Nissan & Mazda. We’re not digging through GM’s sales chart to find a vehicle that had a bad sales month.
      In the near future, we’ll be talking about other vehicles that aren’t selling well. (eg. VW Passat, Toyota Avalon, Honda Fit, Kia Forte, Subaru Crosstrek, Hyundai Ionic)

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        GM’s strategy? Do you mean all of the insiders dumping their stock before quarterlies are released?

        • 0 avatar
          Peter Gazis

          ToddAtlasF1

          You mean the quarterly report that came out yesterday. That said GM Made $2.4 Billion in income(profit) in the 2nd quarter? Up 1.5% over the same quarter last year.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Wait for the next one. If GM is canceling parts orders for their resistible pickup trucks, the fall is coming. You can only cut capacity to fudge the balance sheets so many times before you’re just a storefront and a phone.

          • 0 avatar
            Peter Gazis

            ToddAtlasF1

            Don’t worry your pretty little head about GM. They’ll be fine. Their crossover sales are growing like wildfire, and there are more crossovers on the way. (Trailblazer & Encore GX)

            Worry about poor little Japan. Their companies bet heavily on cars, and car sales are falling. Meanwhile their trucks & large SUVs have become outdated. They’ve fallen behind on future technologies. The Chinese are about to start dumping millions of low cost vehicles in Japan’s backyard. With slow model cadence they can’t quickly revamp their lineups. Things have gotten so bad that Toyota has to buy it’s sport cars from BMW, and the people of Japan have resorted to eating whale.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Peter Gazis,
            GM is at roughly 6% net income as a percentage of revenue. Toyota is around 9%.

            Matthew,
            I’m fine with tables published quarterly. (I like the tables very much.)

          • 0 avatar
            Peter Gazis

            Toolguy

            Nissan used to make money too. Why don’t you go to Toyota’s website see what models are selling well, and then we’ll talk.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      The $36k ‘average’ price is the mean, not the median, so it’s a bogus stat. The fact that there are great cars available in the low 20s makes every argument about average car price and cars are too expensive moot.

      As for inflation–$7k in 1980 = $23k now. Or in other words, you can buy a great car today for the same dollar value as then, except today’s cars are better in every measurable way.

      Making a manual available doesn’t increase sales for anyone (in the US) because so few people want them. If Mazda put a manual in ever model & trim, and required every dealer to keep at least one of each on their lot, their sales would not increase.

      Rather, it seems much more likely that Mazda, being a historical niche manufacturer targeting driving engagement/fun, is trying to change segments into near luxury, and their customer base is now the intersection of those two segments. Before the transition, they said that their products are for only ~25% of the overall market, and with their changes, that easily could be down to 15%. So of course their sales are going to drop.
      If Mazda wants to succeed, they have to figure out how to drag their old group of potential customers with them, and how to attract near-luxury buyers who previously weren’t interested.

      Also, they just launched a car in a market that doesn’t care about cars. When they launch new SUVs, then they can expect a bump up in sales.

  • avatar
    AA610

    Off topic, but given the image at the top, I thought I would comment.

    I never thought I would become a Honda Accord guy after having always gravitated to entry level CPO luxury cars. But man, that car is a great value for the money. I test drove it recently.. it’s quite nice.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Love my Accord Touring 2.0T I bought in June, despite my weeping and gnashing of teeth about the V6 loss. Gas mileage at 80mph could be improved, but my engine could still be breaking in a bit; the gas tank is smaller than the last, which means fillups are a weekly occurrence with my doubling of my commute distance to get around a multi-year construction debacle!

      I’ve also occasionally had infotainment reboots, which will probably be addressed with an update at some point. Which brings me to a question: does HyundKia have problems with infotainment bugs on new models? Honda certainly does, which is why I didn’t jump at a new Accord last year (along with the new engines).

      The rest of the car is spectacular, including the 10-speed auto! My question about the HyundKia infotainment stands. Do other makers have problems that literally turn people from the brand because of the glitchy screens?

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        “… the gas tank is smaller than the last, which means fillups are a weekly occurrence”

        Every manufacturer is doing this now, they’re playing the long game against range anxiety for the future shift to EVs by conditioning us to think that regular cars were a pain in the butt to keep refilled too.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          In the Accord’s case, they were making room for the battery packs while allowing for the rear seats to fold, unlike the previous Accord Hybrid, whose battery pack was placed such that it necessitated fixed rear seats, but also ate up several ft^3 of trunk space. Why Honda couldn’t source a larger gas tank to go in that space for pure ICE cars — which will have a higher volume versus the Hybrids — one can only speculate! It’s a minor inconvenience to which I simply haven’t adjusted just yet.

        • 0 avatar

          @Dan:

          Do you have any data to back that up? It sounds suspiciously like tin-foil hat stuff.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            Yeah, the last new vehicle I bought came with a 48 gallon fuel tank so they aren’t all doing it….

      • 0 avatar
        ABC-2000

        sgeffe,

        I also drive the new 2.0T, love that car, infotainment system reboot on me much less times than 2016 or 2014 Accords, gas tank is a joke, this car is thirsty in city driving, I got way better MPG on the last 2.4L CVT and it was 200LB heavier than 2018.
        The 10 speed A/T was kicking on 2nd or 3rd gear, I did not go to the dealer as some people said it will eventually go away at 7K, mine stopped kicking at about 4K, I think this A/T is brilliant, only problem, 1st gear is way too short and make the wheels spin if your not delicate.

        About Mazda, I had 2 of them in the past, I was looking to come back in December 2018, I thought of getting a Mazda 6 but no luck, dealer network sucks and seems as if they doing you a favor by selling you a car, specially the one in New Rochelle, NY, brought me into the dealership for nothing, never returned my calls, super arrogant.

      • 0 avatar
        AA610

        That’s the exact one I want. Touring model. The 2.0T packs just enough punch for me.

  • avatar
    Robotdawn

    I’ve finally seen some of the current non zoom zoom Mazda commercials and know exactly why their sales are slipping. It may pay off in the long run to appeal to people who can actually afford new cars, and appear more up-market, but short term it’s murder.
    You can’t aim at 25 year olds with dubious credit for 20 years as a market and turn towards 40 year olds with new money on a dime. We’ll see if the brand can last long enough to make that change. It takes a long, long time to change perceptions in the car industry.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      @Robotdawn

      Mazda has great engineering, some great designs… compelling products in many ways….but its marketing is absolutely WRONG. I say this as a Mazda loyalist–I am on my third Mazda.

      Too bad…so much potential… As with so many plucky automotive independents throughout history, they just can’t seem to pull all the necessary elements together to move to the “next level.”

      • 0 avatar
        Robotdawn

        @R Henry
        You are probably the theoretical target of Mazda’s advertising right now, if you’ve had 3 Mazdas. You may have bought your first Mazda because it was still a bit of a drivers car, a bit sporty, and had a good price for what income you were making at the time.
        Now, you have more money and a lot more options. Your tastes and needs change from MX5 to CX5. There are a dozen competitors to that CX5 that more prestige, better quality and better features. Or will be unless Mazda can make you believe they are just as good as a Honda or GMC or Jeep.
        Perhaps reality is they already are as good, most car makes have trims that would make Mercedes blush 20 years ago, but perception is what counts.
        Pure speculation. For all I know you are Bill Gates grandson.

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      I think Mazda badly needs a halo car. For so long, back to the 1970s through earlier this decade, it was an RX-model that set the tone that you were buying into a fun, sports car driven model. The MX-5 still carries that torch, but price and status=wise, it isn’t “elevated.”
      One day, we’ll see the RX-9. Maybe in the crystal ball, they’ll dust off a replacement to the long lost 929. Or a Mazdaspeed MX-5 or 3 (PLEASE!!!) But a Signature Edition Mazda6 or CX-9 isn’t a halo vehicle. It doesn’t stand what Mazda stands for. They have plenty of excellent cars and CUVs in their lineup, but to move upmarket like they badly want to do, they need an image to hold onto. And that, besides the MX-5, is what they are lacking.

      • 0 avatar
        StudeDude

        Your point is well taken. Since Mazda is working on an inline 6 cylinder Skyactive X engine with Toyota, one would presume that it is headed for a Mazda halo model on the Mazda side and a different application for Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Mazda’s problem is that they’re following the strategy that VW largely abandoned for the US market (more premium/higher priced mainstream vehicles).

      On top of that, Mazda’s lineup tends to be more cramped than the competition (adding more fuel to Mazda’s being less of value in the eyes of the typical American buyer) and the spotty dealer network doesn’t help things.

      The plus side is that there are other markets which appreciate things like nicer interiors (and are willing to pay for them) and don’t need the interior room of an Accord or Camry – so Mazda does a good bit better in those markets.

      For instance, if one were to say that Honda is Mazda’s biggest competition for the “sportier side” among Japanese makes (now that Nissan is a shell of what it once was) – Mazda absolutely crushes Honda in markets like the EU and Australia.

  • avatar
    jeoff

    I know their cars are different, but I think potential Subaru and Mazda customers have a high degree of overlap —urban, wanting to express a little bit of individuality, and Subaru’s “Love” killed Mazda’s “zoom-zoom”.

    • 0 avatar
      eCurmudgeon

      Chronic traffic congestion and bad roads in many parts of the country also tend to put a damper on “zoom-zoom.” Which is why Americans have voted for utility vehicles instead…

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I rarely have trouble winding my SS out, the issue isn’t the space to do it, it’s the fact that the only sporty Mazda that still has any “zoom-zoom” is the MX-5, and while the engine issue has been fixed on that, there is a hesitation to spending $25k on a brand new two seater with a tiny engine that half of the country can’t fit/get into.

        The rest of the lineup is anti-sporty and feels glacially underpowered.

        But the primary reason for the sales slip? Prices, Mazda’s don’t command the prices they ask, this is seen by the resale, they can’t pull a BMW and try to sell on a history of Protege

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I had the SS’s ancestor (a G8 GXP). I sold it because where I live I almost never got a chance to use its performance, but I had to live with the rattly interior and questionable build quality every day.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    For me, weighing positives and negatives:
    Mazda seems to only have about 10% better driving dynamics and good CR reliability as a positive
    It has a whole bunch of ‘meh.’
    And it has some significant negatives like low resale and few dealers.
    In other words: I don’t need them, I don’t desire them, and I probably never will.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Mazda has severe problems, number one in my opinion being the engines. I went to look at a 2016 MX-5, the salesman made a point that I would love the sound of the engine on startup. With that in mind I started the engine only to hear a rattly diesel like groan, I’m not sure what he expected me to think of that, it rattled, clattered, and sounded like it had 300k miles instead of 22k for a good 2-3 before settling out. What baffled me was that I drove up on my SS so I know the salesman heard the crackle and rumble of that exhaust, and I can’t imagine what he expected me to think about that diesel clatter in a small sports car.

    My understanding is that issue has been fixed in the ND2, but I was less than impressed by the ND.

    The 2.5L in my dad’s 2010 Mazda 3 sounded much quieter and less noisy than the 2.0 but was simply lacking power needed to haul that car around. Don’t try adding people.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    With regard to Mazda, I don’t find the new 3 hatch to be particularly attractive and I’m seeing very few of them on the road.

    2004-2009 was great looking for the time and probably was an annual sales leader. 2010-2013 was less visually appealing but I gather still sold well enough. 2015-2018 another win in the design department.

    So in the compact segment, I feel like they’re on a great, not so great type of cycle styling wise.

    I’m curious why they’ve made their design cycles so short on the 3. Only 4 model years.

  • avatar
    Oldschool

    it seems like a large portion of this country has been sleeping on Hyundai/Kia vehicles besides for out here in CA where they are starting to dominate the roadways. Mazda’s are really nice cars, one of the best if not, the best interior quality for their price.

    It’s insane to know how many trucks GM sold, first of all they are super expensive and overpriced IMO. They are lucky so many people are stupid enough to drop over 60K on new trucks, because once the economy contracts, and we are in a recession they are going to be suffering badly as they don’t have anything to offer consumers besides for trucks and SUV’s, same can be said of Ford.

    Typical short term thinking of an American corporation.

    At least they’re doing better than most companies, but how long will the good times roll? Nothing last forever.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    I don’t get the pun relationship between Hyundai and stellar/stars. Maybe i need some coffee

    • 0 avatar
      ShoogyBee

      Hyundai Stellar was their first mid-sized sedan. It is the Sonata’s predecessor. I believe the Stellar was sold in Canada, but not in the United States.

      EDIT – I believe MotorWeek uploaded a Retro Review of the Stellar. Look it up on their YouTube page.

      • 0 avatar
        Mackie

        Yes we had these in Canada. Terrible cars, made during their malaise era.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          That “malaise era” was more like their infancy.

          The Stellar used the old Ford Cortina chassis (Hyundai had built and sold the Cortina on license) powered by a Mitsu powertrain.

          Hyundai’s reliability didn’t really start to improve until they started developing their own powertrain components and stopped sourcing them from Mitsu.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    American Axle stock just tanked today on their reporting of, and I quote, “…dismal sales” of General Motors Chevrolet and GMC pickup trucks.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Google, or preferably DuckDuckGo or StartPage search ‘Crain’s Detroit- and -American Axle Dismal Earnings Report’ as published today.

  • avatar
    millerluke

    I bought my first new car this past spring, formerly only getting used vehicles. A job promotion (that came with a hefty car allowance, and 40,000+ km per year) made a new car an easy choice… so I thought.
    I wanted an Accord 2.0T Sport, but the dealer just said “Sorry, we don’t have one.” Same with the GM dealer (“Sorry, we can’t sell you an Impala, we can only lease you one.”) and Dodge (“We’ll call you if we get a Charger in.”) I considered a Mazda 6, but there were no dealers near me – as an aside, I wonder how each manufacturer would fare if you measured average sales per dealer?

    I ended up with a Camry, cause they got me one with no problem and the price was reasonable. It’s an unreliable vehicle, though – new transmission at 220km(!) and new front brakes at only 16000km. All repaired under warranty, but still. New trans acting up, but apparently no worse than average for the new Camrys.

    All that said, I kinda wish I had got a Mazda, but the fact there’s no dealer within 45 minutes of me makes it somewhat impractical. Honda, Toyota, GM, Ford, Dodge, Hyundai, Kia and Nissan all have dealerships within 5 minutes.

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      If Toyota loses their reliability cred they are in the same boat as GM 20 years ago. Not a single car in their lineup that doesn’t come with major compromises, all made up by the fact they are dead reliable.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        That’s a matter of perspective. For one thing, Toyota’s dominance of reliability rankings is as great as ever.

        http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2019/02/21/consumer-reports-best-cars-2019-subaru-toyota-dominate-top-picks/2936504002/
        http://www.autonews.com/article/20181029/OEM01/181029756/why-toyota-rules-the-reliability-roost

        For another thing, Toyota has the least compromised midsized sedan, the least compromised CUV, and the least compromised SUVs. There’s no need to settle for a CVT, or a turbo GDI. They do now offer some shady stuff with current technical follies, but they also offer the only cars in volume segments worthy of buying instead of renting.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “While Toyota scored four wins in the 10 vehicle categories, surging Japanese automaker Subaru was named as the best brand in the industry, beating even luxury competitors.”

          “‘The big winner really looks like Subaru,’ said Jake Fisher, senior director of auto testing for Consumer Reports. ‘In terms of reliability, the ways the cars test and safety, they really are No. 1.\'”
          _________________________________________

          So for you CR is credible when it comes to rating to Toyota, but 100% wrong when it comes to Subaru?

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Supposedly, Toyota’s investment in Subaru and Mazda has cured their reliability issues.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Um, no.

            And both Mazda and Subaru have been experiencing reliability issues ever since they partnered up w/ Toyota.

            Toyota’s continuance w/ reliability (not that they also haven’t had their issues here and there) is due in large part due to keeping powertrain components around for a LONG time and when they add things like a turbo (such as the turbo-4 for the IS and GS), it’s underpowered compared to the competition.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            They’re doing better than their competitors, who are throwing more frangible technology at their CAFE problems with worse results.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Mazda’s and Subaru’s reliability started to improve well before any tie up w/ Toyota.

            And Subaru is experiencing a drop quality and not long ago, had a scandal in Japan over improper inspections.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            From an Auto News article –

            “Quality questions

            Subaru’s sterling reputation lost a little luster this year. Recalls already were spiking because of the Takata airbag inflator callbacks, but that massive quality headache was bedeviling nearly every major automaker. Of greater concern are a series of Subaru-only glitches.

            Adding insult to injury, Subaru dropped six places in Consumer Reports’ benchmark annual Auto Reliability Survey, slumping from ‘more reliable’ to a middling ‘reliable’ ranking of 11, behind Asian mass-market rivals such as Kia, Hyundai, Mazda, Honda and Toyota.”

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I’ve been saying for years that Toyota is the new GM, resting on their laurels while cutting corners left and right as well as badge engineering products from other mfgs. Yes they did have a hand in the FR-S and Supra design but the basic architecture is all Subaru or BMW. While the Yaris is a Mazda 2 which isn’t exactly competitive.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Selling Mazdas, BMWs, and Subarus is certainly a nasty harbinger of how globalist regulations are pulling the future out from under us, but Toyota still builds the best cars in the world and the gap is getting bigger. The difference now is that you need to know the particulars of the Toyota you buy to get one that won’t have the sorts of short lived components that everyone else’s cars have.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Being at or near the top of reliability rankings does not = to the “best cars.”

            Automakers like Honda, Kia, Mazda and Hyundai have far more models picked as Editors’ Choices by Car & Driver.

            And Consumer Reports, long been criticized as being biased in favor of Toyota, gives Toyota a LOWER overall (lineup) Road Test score than for Honda, Kia, Mazda, Hyundai, Chevy, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            “The difference now is that you need to know the particulars of the Toyota you buy to get one that won’t have the sorts of short lived components that everyone else’s cars have.”

            I’ve said the same thing about certain GM (and other) vehicles and been told I’ve been drinking too much of the Kool-Aid…

            Here, let me fill your glass…

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      No mid-level Accords, no Impalas, no Chargers. Do you live in Yellowknife or something?

    • 0 avatar
      ShoogyBee

      Do you have a 2018 Camry? Which engine? What happened to the transmission? I heard the 8-speed’s programming is awful, but I’m surprised to hear that it failed altogether.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      What kind of messed up GM dealer won’t sell you an Impala, if they actually have one on the lot? I know they aren’t that common around here. I can see them saying that they can’t give you a good deal unless you lease because the incentives on the leases are much higher than on the buy.

      I’m also surprised that a CDJR dealer doesn’t have any Chargers in stock the ones around here at least have a few.

      The lack of an Accord sport is understandable though.

      And yeah the Camry is a shadow of its former self.

      • 0 avatar
        millerluke

        ajla – I’m in Central Ontario, in the middle of truck country. Every dealer has a lotful of trucks and SUVs, and entry level cars. But no one had new, mid-level cars, anywhere.

        Scoutdude, you echo my thoughts on messed up GM dealers. I get a vehicle allowance from work, so even without any incentives, I still could buy a brand new Impala, no problem. But no, they flat refused to sell me one. Since I put over 40,000km a year on the vehicle, leasing doesn’t really work for me…

        ShoogyBee – the programming is awful, and I didn’t expect wholesale failure either – it’s a 2019 with the 2.5L. The dealer never did say what happened to the tranny, but did mention hearing gears rattling around inside…

  • avatar
    BWalker82

    Where the hell are the charts?!!?!?

  • avatar
    TakeshiHonda

    Mazda: sporty, stylish, dependable

    Also Mazda: smaller (inside and out), less efficient than main rivals, no hybrids/EVs, wannabe luxe, charge luxe prices, limited tech, limited choices, limited dealer network, automobile media darling

    Consumer: i’d rather have a Civic… or even a Forte

    Texan consumer: Mazda… no trucks, no deal

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