By on August 15, 2019

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The United Kingdom, a highly populous (and heavily taxed) country that’s smaller than 11 U.S. states, may serve as a canary in the coal mine for electric vehicle adoption. If there’s enough places to charge up your EV, will buyers make the switch?

From across the pond comes news that, for the first time, the number of public electric vehicle charging stations has surpassed that of gasoline and diesel stations. It’s been a long road, as “normal” stations have been on a steady decline since 1970. EV stations popped up in earnest earlier this decade, fueled by government investments and green group initiatives, as well as efforts by automakers eager to provide fuel sources for their new vehicles.

Battery-electric vehicle market share in the UK in July? 1.4 percent.

Whoa, whoa, you say — Not fair! BEVs haven’t even been on the road for a decade. It’ll take time to weed out the old crowd!

For sure. No argument. And indeed, recent introductions like the Tesla Model 3 and Hyundai Kona Electric offer driving ranges that far surpass that of previous “attainable” EVs. Still, England is not known for its massive driving distances, and was the first country on the planet to consider itself well served by rail transport.

It’s been a decade of flux in the UK and the rest of Europe. Whereas diesel was once the celebrated, commonplace, less-taxed fuel option, that’s all gone the way of Britpop. The Volkswagen diesel scandal left a sour taste in the mouth of legislators; in the scandal’s wake, new taxes popped up on the fuel in an attempt to dissuade buyers from choosing an oil burner for their commuting vehicle. Sales plummeted.

At the same time, every more stringent continent-wide emissions standards came into effect, and will continue to do so. To protect their own existence, automakers quickly turned away from diesel for lofty MPGs and invested in battery propulsion. We’re beginning to see that tide wash up on shore in earnest.

Image: zap-map.com

And yet even with all of these forces working against traditional internal combustion cars, an overnight explosion in BEV ownership did not occur, nor would anyone expect it. One problem: recharging infrastructure. In 2018, the country hosted 6,699 public charging stations of some sort (it could be a slow charger or the speediest in the land). Now, just a year later, the country’s Energy Institute (via Autocar) reports that 9,199 stations exist, outnumbering the UK’s 8,396 gas stations. See above for a location map. (It’s worth mentioning that a charging station may only be capable of handling one vehicle at a time. Show me a modern gas station that does that.)

Clearly, no shortage of investment went into making the technology viable for consumers in the past few years. Still, the public rebelled against the country’s cut in consumer subsidies late last year, and it seems the loss of taxpayer cash has resulted in the elevation of one type of vehicle and the looming death of another.

Last October, the UK government cut the BEV subsidy from 4,500 pounds (about $5,450) to 3,500 pounds ($4,240) and eliminated the plug-in hybrid subsidy ($3,030) altogether. Guess what happened? People went where the free money was, even if in many cases it meant a slightly pricier car, or decided to save cash. Gas in the UK is incredibly expensive, keep in mind.

According to  The Guardian, “electrified” vehicles (BEVs, hybrids, plug-in hybrids) fell on a year-over-year basis in June, the first time the segment recorded a monthly decline since April of 2017. That figure hides key info, however. In June, BEV sales rose 61.7 percent while PHEVs sank by roughly half compared to the previous June, and July’s figures show a continuation of the trend.

Last month, the country recorded a 158 percent year-over-year increase in BEV sales, pushing their market share from 0.5 percent in 2018 to 1.4 percent. That’s a significant jump. Plug-in hybrids fell 49.6 percent, lowering their market share from 2.1 percent to 1.1 percent. Plain-Jane hybrid sales, which never benefited from a subsidy, rose over 34 percent for the month. Regular hybrids amounted to just under 5 percent of last month’s UK auto sales.

It seems people who would have bought a plug-in are giving in and deciding to go greener, or taking the cheaper route by going slightly less green. Diesel vehicles, for what it’s worth, continue to slide, with deliveries down 22.1 percent in July. Market share for diesel, which just a handful of years ago topped 50 percent, now stands at 25.9 percent.

Year to date, fully electric vehicle sales are up over 70 percent, hybrids are up over 19 percent, and plug-in hybrids have fallen by more than 32 percent.

What does this all prove? The green car industry, even in a favorable market, can’t count on boffo business without help. Subsidies to sweeten the deal, readily available public infrastructure, and a host of regulations (and associated taxes, fees, and fines) to strongarm consumers and companies in the right direction.

It makes you wonder about the United States, which so many automakers see as fertile ground for green conquest. Can there be any doubt as to why so many people have a less than optimistic outlook on a rapid consumer conversion?

[Image: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, zap-map.com]

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44 Comments on “Fueling Stations Reach Parity in UK As Subsidy Cut Sinks Plug-in Hybrids...”


  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    “Fueling Stations Reach Parity in UK As Subsidy Cut Sinks Plug-in Hybrids”

    Gibberish a;fha;sfjas;lfj;asdl

    Who cares.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Who cares

    • 0 avatar
      Lokki

      Why 1.4 percent of the car buying market – that’s who cares!

      I always get the giggles from statements like

      “Last month, the country recorded a 158 percent year-over-year increase in BEV sales, pushing their market share from 0.5 percent in 2018 to 1.4 percent. That’s a significant jump.”

      Yes, It IS a jump, but it it really significant? That ‘153 percent increase’ is a jump to 2271 BEV’s sold in July of this year as opposed to 880 in July of last year …but 2271 BEV’s out of 157,198… is hardly a bellwether for a change in buyer habits.
      https://www.am-online.com/news/market-insight/2019/08/05/ev-registrations-almost-triple-as-july-s-new-car-sales-fall-41

      And then there’s this article from the BBC on 4 July 2019
      https://www.bbc.com/news/business-48865702
      ‘Grave concern’ as sales of low emission cars fall’

      So it would appear that BEV’s are simply taking a larger slice of a smaller pie.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        What’s interesting to me is the fact that the number of true BEVs sold exceeded the number of PHEVs left unsold. The pie, therefore is growing, not shrinking, and the BEVs now have the larger share.

        To me this is not bad news but rather extraordinarily good news as BEVs are losing a “competitor” and growing total market share.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    The Holy Grail, is, as it always has been, is range and fueling parity (similar range and similar refueling time) with ICE vehicles. Until that develops, electrics will remain niche players.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I agree. IMO the best adaptation and acceptance of EVs into the real global automotive scene is the …..Hybrid (PHEV).

      One reason that the Prius was such an enormous success is that it alleviated range anxiety and could fully utilize the existing ICE infrastructure.

      Now that is flexibility. That’s the way to Improvise, Adapt and Overcome the reluctance to EVs.

      Gotta love that. And millions upon millions of real-world buyers did just that by putting their money where there mouth was and buying a Prius of any variant.

      Sometimes even more than one. And sometimes again as repeat buyers.

      Toyota, Oh What A Feeling!

      Ahead of its time, as usual.

      Toyota.

  • avatar
    RangerM

    Does charging “stations” mean the same thing as Gas/Diesel “stations”.

    The latter usually has multiple pumps capable of refilling a tank in 5 minutes or less.

    To reach parity, I’d think the charging stations would have to be capable of matching the distance (ie. range)-per-unit-time (to charge/refill).

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @RangerM: The problem is that too many people rely on that metric when it is essentially irrelevant. If you have a home with a private parking space, then you can recharge at home, with no care as to how long it takes to do so.

      • 0 avatar
        RangerM

        Although I’m not aware of a link to a statistic, many private homes in the UK don’t have a private parking space, iirc.

        Not that an extension cord couldn’t be used (especially when it’s the neighbor’s house), as we saw in another story, recently.

        https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a28524175/tesla-owner-steals-electricity-charging/

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          While true, that also means that many private homes DO have a private parking space. Think about it.

          I live in a row home and I have TWO private parking spaces. Additionally, other row homes in my neighborhood not only have two private parking spaces but also garages and some even have a short driveway long enough for a compact car. Add the carriage houses with one- and two-car garages also in my neighborhood and they have the ability, should they install it, to charge up to five vehicles with nothing more than a 240V, 50A extension cord.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    There should be NO assistance to offset costs of one vehicle over another. All this does is to shift the tax burden from the adopter to everyone else which means deficit spending and the interest cost to carry the debt into perpetuity (or until the pitchforks are raised when the cost of such debt becomes revolutionary.)

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Sounds good. When can we stop paying trillions to invade Middle Eastern countries for access to their oil to ensure that we can fuel our gas cars for half the price of most other countries?

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        I guess you missed it, but the US is not dependent on the Middle East for oil and by next year is on track to be a net exporter of oil, if not sooner

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @thornmark: I guess you missed it but the oil the US exports is not as good as the oil the US imports. We ARE dependent on the Middle East at least until they run dry.

          Meanwhile, we’ve been a ‘net exporter’ for years. China’s our biggest oil customer.

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            wrong

            but you are a magical thinker that knows so much that is simply not true
            https://www.manhattan-institute.org/green-energy-revolution-near-impossible

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Thornmark: You poor boy; you’ve been had.
            • “The mission of the Manhattan Institute is to develop and disseminate new ideas that foster greater economic choice and individual responsibility.”
            • “The Institute serves as a leading voice of free-market ideas, shaping political culture since our founding in 1977.”

            This gives the first lie to the linked article’s premise. The article claims as “Impossible” things that are already happening and then uses misleading information •with no supporting research* to claim the whole precept is impossible. In fact, the simple fact that the headline says, “… An Exercise in Magical Thinking” shows just how much of a scam this is. This is literally nothing more than an effort to PREVENT progress, not encourage it. Why use the word “magical” if they’re not trying to embarrass and bully the reader into believing they’ve made a bad decision.

            But what’s more “magical” to me is that you tried to link your article to my very clear statement that American oil is not as clean and pure as Middle Eastern, despite the fact that the oil companies themselves call Middle Eastern oil ‘sweet’ ‘light’ oil which is low in sulfur content and not as heavy as US crude. American shale oil may also be light, but it’s sour and requires more refining to remove the sulfur (which makes it cheaper to export to a country that doesn’t care.)

            “Magical Thinker”? No. Experienced and willing normally to dig for the truth and not accept any statement as true if it doesn’t have verifiable data to back it up.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I guess the last two administrations missed it too, because they stubbornly keep spending so much blood and treasure trying to keep the Middle East from descending into total chaos.

          The motives for that are not humanitarian; if they were, we’d be doing the same thing in DR Congo.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Does the UK have the same problem as the US such that on major holidays when many people are doing long distance travel, the juice stands which are numerous enough for everyday wind up as a major queue?

  • avatar
    dal20402

    You do not need to have exact fueling-time parity for EVs to be competitive overall.

    Being able to charge at home most of the time, and so not having to bother with the vast majority of the gas station stops you used to do, easily offsets slower stops on the very few occasions when most people take long road trips.

    The problem with EV adoption is not charging, it’s a combination of unfamiliarity and price. EVs with only-car range (which I’d define as >200 miles) are still very expensive, and people who have never owned them have a lot of misconceptions and fears about how they work.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @dal: Agreed whole-heartedly. Too many people simply don’t want to understand the advantages simply because it’s different to what they’ve grown accustomed. All this totally ignores the fuel-cost benefits of going electric over petrol.

    • 0 avatar
      forward_look

      ” …people who have never owned them ” is 98% of the population.

      You can’t even rent an EV to try them out. Not in England, not in Eire, not even in Hawai’i, good grief!

      If manufacturers actually want to sell these things, they will build ones with long range, without the usual dealer BS, and insure there’s chargers all over the place. Oh, I think I just described Tesla.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I think the best way to sell them would be to lend out both a car and a charging station for a couple of weeks. It would demystify EVs for people and, even more important, make them realize how much range they actually need.

        For a second car, 120 miles or so is enough. For an only car, needs vary, but almost no one in an urban area uses more than 200 miles a day. But people are stuck in a frame of reference of weekly gas station stops 300-400 miles apart and don’t grasp that charging at home changes the equation.

        Our Bolt has been under 60% charge once in the three months we’ve owned it, and that was a short road trip.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I don’t even think they would need to lend out a charging station, since if the house has a dryer outlet in the garage or near a door or window, it could be charged with a simple, if heavy, extension cord. At least that would give the prospective buyers an opportunity to properly try it out.

          I do think you’re right, though. Giving ordinary owners an opportunity to properly try out the BEV might be just what they need to have their minds changed.

    • 0 avatar
      Oreguy

      @Dal… “The problem with EV adoption is not charging, it’s a combination of unfamiliarity and price.”

      That’s the truth.

      This summer, we completed a ~5000 mile round trip from Oregon to Minnesota in our Model 3. We fielded a LOT of questions from strangers, friends, and family during the journey. The level of ignorance about BEV’s, ranging from how they operate, charge, etc. is stunning to say the least. I see this continuing until more people have access to them through test-drives, rentals, rides with friends, co-workers, etc.

      I needed to find out for myself how a trip of that magnitude was going to play out. We had zero issues, and I’m not kidding, but I credit this entirely to Tesla’s charging network. Would I try the same trip in ANY other manufacturer’s EV today? No way. Other manufacturers and/or entities will need to solve this before adoption becomes more widespread.

      For daily-use, I don’t even think about public charging options other than the one in my garage that I plug into overnight 2-3 times a week. Not even on my radar.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        We did our summer road trip (a bit over 2000 miles) in our Highlander Hybrid (which, incidentally, was sensational in that kind of use). I won’t lie: even if our Bolt had the cargo capacity to carry all the flotsam we brought along, it would have been quite a bit harder.

        Washington and Oregon are pretty well covered by a private charging network that had its initial installation subsidized by those two states’ governments. But once we got into Idaho and Utah, things would have gotten dicier quickly. Not many fast chargers to be seen, and even regular level 2 chargers are rare enough that if one were out of commission I could be in a bit of a spot.

        Eventually there will be a J1772 fast charging network as good as Tesla’s, and then non-Tesla EV road trips will be an easier thing.

        • 0 avatar
          Oreguy

          You are correct about the infrastructure in the west. It’s plentiful compared to other locales.

          Subsidies aren’t the long-term solution though. I don’t want to ever count on or expect the government to provide these services. There needs to be some buy-in from the private sector. There was plenty of evidence of that along our trip, ranging from hotels we stayed in that offered free level 2 charging, to gas stations (!!), even a giant liquor store in ND with J1772’s.

          The Electrify America network shows promise. We spotted some stations under construction at Wal-Marts. The Target near our home is scheduled for one. Smart move by retailers. Not much different than the gas stations located at Costco or the Fred Meyers in our region).

          Even with the ~30 minute stops we made at Superchargers, if there was a store, restaurant, or some other business that caught our attention within walking distance, we walked in.

          The charging stops forced us to look around a bit in small towns along the interstate. I know, you can do this on any road trip, with any car, but who does this much anymore? With the pace of life today, everyone wants to get their destination NOW!

          The unexpected part of the trip? All of those CUV’s and SUV’s packed with families on vacation traveling the same route… we repeatedly passed each other despite our different refueling requirements.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I have no issue with subsidies for station installation if (as is the case with the WA/OR highway network) they don’t provide ongoing operating funding. The transition will have enough public benefit that it’s worth spending one-time money to hasten it.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    PHEVs are dying off because:

    1. BEVs are so much better than before.
    2. PHEVs are dual-fuel vehicles, with all the complications of ICE and BEV combined. Exhibit A is the Volt – a good car with limited lifespan in the evolution of vehicle technology.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I think the Rivian mini-trucklet will be a success and will sell every one they make because it slots nicely into a specific niche.

      The biggest thing holding back BEVs is price, range, recharging time, and recharging infrastructure in the US.

      I may buy a Rivian mini-trucklet for local, in-town running around if it is priced reasonably because with a BEV you can leave that thing hooked up to the charger for months at a time without damaging the battery.

      That would be handy for me, since we are gone for weeks and months at a time when we travel.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @hdc: Exactly how small do you think the Rivian will be? According to its specs, it’s bigger than the Ford Ranger/Chevy Colorado, even if it is slightly smaller than full-sized. It ain’t no mini trucklet. It intends to attack both full and mid-sized markets.

        You are partially right about one thing–but only partially. The Rivian is priced in the range of the Limited, High Country and Laramie Longhorn models by Ford, Chevy and RAM, in that order. Range is expected to bee in the 400-mile area, so it’s no piker for going the distance compared to the above with standard fuel tank. Recharging is still a non-issue EXCEPT when traveling outside of normal range, at which point the question becomes one of which stops first, the vehicle or the driver? More often than not the driver has to stop before the vehicle needs a refuel/recharge. As for the recharging infrastructure, that appears to be growing quickly, both in the home AND on the road.

        No, I don’t see you buying a Rivian for the simple fact that you don’t even know what it is or what it can do. Nor do I think you want to.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Vulpine, I followed the Ford announcement and Rivian PR stuff to get to the point that I have decided it, the Rivian trucklet, is a contender when I decide to buy another vehicle. It suits MY needs for short-haul transportation.

          This is premised on me staying in ONE place, with limited traveling. Currently we do a lot of traveling and rarely stay in one place for very long.

          This was the problem with owning both my 2016 Tundra and my wife’s 2016 Sequoia. While we were out of the US, both of those vehicles just sat and baked in the desert sun for the duration we were away.

          Currently I split my time between El Paso, TX and Dog Canyon, NM, both well within the range of a Rivian.

          Currently we do not own any vehicles and get around in borrowed (daughter’s 2013 Odyssey/son’s 2011 Tundra he bought from me) or rented (Enterprise, Hertz) vehicles.

          If I buy a Rivian, it won’t be the only vehicle in our household when we settle down in one place.

          My wife will pick what she wants to drive, and I believe it will be another Sequoia because she LOVED her 2016. Absolutely loved it – the power seats; smooth, quiet ride; luxurious interior appointments; abundance of available power.

          We’ll cough up the money once we decide to commit to buying what works best for us. The Rivian won’t be used as a long-distance vehicle, just a local grocery-getter and errand gitgoer.

          Then again, this may not happen for awhile since we’ll be going to Ensenada as soon as the vulgarities of business (yeah, vulgarities!) have been completed.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @hdc: “Vulpine, I followed the Ford announcement and Rivian PR stuff to get to the point that I have decided it, the Rivian trucklet, is a contender when I decide to buy another vehicle. It suits MY needs for short-haul transportation.”

            I admit to surprise that you’re looking at it as a true contender. I still expect YOU will surprised at how large it is. It is NOT a “trucklet” any more than my Colorado is, at over 18 feet long and 6 feet tall. The Rivian will be LARGER than my Colorado, as I said before.

            It does sound like it could meet your needs for local operation and I expect the cost of operation will surprise you at just how cheap it will be–though I’m not a fan of the up-front price even myself. I will note that I didn’t like the price of what I did buy but at least I didn’t have to finance it, either. $40K+ for a 4×4 pickup of any type is beyond reason but unlike full-sized trucks, dealers and OEMs don’t put a whole lot on the hood of the so-called mid-sized models and I flat refused to consider a full sized truck because they’re simply too large. That’s why I’ve been calling them Road Whales™ for the last 6 years.

            In my own case, I absolutely want a BEV. Despite all the supposed limitations so may proclaim, I see nearly every one of those limitations as an advantage–since they are highly unlikely to limit ME.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @hdc : “This was the problem with owning both my 2016 Tundra and my wife’s 2016 Sequoia. While we were out of the US, both of those vehicles just sat and baked in the desert sun for the duration we were away.”

            — Why no carport? I’d think you’d want to get the sun off your cars, even if you don’t have a garage. A steel or aluminum frame covered with fabric or metal sheets would at least shade the cars during the heat of the day and keep them from baking so much. I know it gets windy at times but even that can be handled without too much effort and the carport would be notably cheaper than building a garage add-on to the house.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Vulpine, the carport issue was because we rarely stayed in one place for very long to call it “home”. And we had that Motor Home for awhile until I blew the engine on June 1, this year. We were on the move, sometimes in our cars, sometimes in the Southwind, sometimes outside the US.

            When my #1 son retired from Banking and took up cattle-ranching in 2015, he moved into our house in Dog Canyon so he could be close to his business-partner who lives in Boles Acres, and his twins who lived there with their mother. We normally leave the cars there with him in the Canyon when we are out of the US but even if covered by a portable car port the sand and dust would permeate the cars, as they have.

            Well, now his ex and their twins live at the Dog Canyon house with him, but our MBR/Bath and part of the old house remains for us to use. It’s just too damn noisy with the twins, the dogs, the horses, the tumult for us old people.

            Without cars now, we no longer have that concern about no carports, because my grandson took the 2016 Tundra off my hands (and is paying me $500/month for it until paid in full.) And the Sequoia we took to WY and turned it over to the main business office, since it was bought as a business vehicle anyway.

            In the home of our daughter in El Paso, her Odyssey and her work car fit in the garage, the Tundra and the Sequoia did not – too long and too high and if our cars were parked in the driveway, she could not get either of her cars in/out of her garage. She lets us use her Odyssey when we need it because she has a car furnished by her employer.

            Other times, for longer trips we rent, for now. Eventually, when we decide to stay in one place, and we have many, many options of properties owned by the real estate business, we’ll have to buy a couple of new cars.

            Highland Ranch (South Denver, CO) is currently high on my list of favorites, but because we belong to two Resort Clubs (because of the Real Estate business) we spend weeks at a time at various locations, both inside and outside the US. We could change our minds.

            So, I’ll have to play it by ear, while we are still “unsettled.”

            It’s nice to have a change of scenery each time we go somewhere. Ensenada, Old Mexico, is a lovely place to reside permanently. Man, they got a Walmart there. What more could you want?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @hdc: An interesting life you have.

      • 0 avatar
        AA610

        The Rivian’s looks nice. I wonder how that whole thing will turn out

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @AA610: I agree about the looks. As for the rest, we’ll just have to wait and see. I think there’s a pretty good chance we’ll see them on the roads in another couple of years since Ford is looking at Rivian to build a ‘shared platform’ for some of their own CUV/SUVs. Ford has shown that they can build a strong BEV version of the F-150 but they have not given any specs on the model. Rivian, on the other hand, was using Ford bodies to mule their drivetrain… with photos showing the Ford bodies were ever-so-slightly longer than the Rivian ‘skateboard’ on which they were mounted.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          I, too, hope that the Rivian will be a success. I’m not an BEV fan, but I can recognize the benefit of such a versatile, mid-range vehicle that is so well slotted for a specific niche.

          And the utility of the bed also allows for some enterprising Rivian owner to install a Honda EU-7000 AC generator in the bed, just in case……

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Gas stations and oil companies make nice profits selling a heavily taxed fuel. Car companies make their major profits selling vehicles that burn the most heavily taxed fuel (i.e. pickups, SUVs, sports cars, large cars).

    Recharging stations are subsidized by taxpayers, electricity customers, or shareholders, and therefore lose money selling an untaxed (or lightly taxed) fuel. Automakers lose money making vehicles that only sell when subsidized and burn the untaxed juice.

    Imagine what will happen when the tax collectors decide that EV owners should start paying fuel taxes, and recharging stations start charging enough for electricity that they can earn a decent profit? Imagine the mindset of citizens when their electricity prices go through the roof due to renewable mandates and the costs associated with vastly expanding the grid to support more EV recharging?

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @stingray: I think you’re wrong on a couple counts, here. Car companies don’t make their profits by selling fuel, they make their profits by selling cars. They’re not going to lose any money by selling a car that uses an ‘untaxed fuel’, if anything they’ll make more money. It’s the oil companies that will lose. The current issue is to get the cost of the BEV down to the equivalent of the respective ICEV class.

      As for the tax collectors; we can be sure they will figure it out and many are already talking about registration fees or other means to get an “equivalent” fee from non-oil users, though the first chirps on this matter see them trying to tax double the ‘equivalent’ rate for BEVs for similar miles. If an ICEV is paying–let’s say 20¢ state and 20¢ Federal tax (arbitrary numbers, both)– for a total of 40¢ per gallon AND the average vehicle is getting maybe 25 miles per gallon, then an average driver at 15,000 miles per year is putting 600 gallons in their vehicle and the governments are getting $120 each or $240 total. Yet at least one proposed state tax was for $2000 at registration or 16 times what the ICEV was paying annually. Now, if we assume the vehicle gets re-registered every two years (it does vary by state) that’s still 8x, that’s 800% per year MORE than the equivalent ICEV. This is not a subsidy, this is a penalty which will slow adoption (and may be exactly what the oil companies are lobbying for in both state and Federal legislations.)

      No, it’s not the electricity prices that will go through the roof, even if some non-Tesla fast chargers are charging higher rates than necessary (more than double the actual cost of the electricity,) but rather registration costs–which should realistically be based on actual miles driven rather than a flat annual or semi-annual fee to balance the usage rate which is automatic with gasoline taxes.

      Again, we don’t know exactly how the taxes will work out but we can be fairly sure they will ultimately come in roughly equivalent to liquid-fuel taxes over time. There’s a lot of complaint that fuel taxes can’t keep up with infrastructure maintenance so I’m pretty sure we’ll be seeing a gas-tax hike about the same time we see an EV-specific tax added.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      “Recharging stations are subsidized by taxpayers, electricity customers, or shareholders, and therefore lose money selling an untaxed (or lightly taxed) fuel.”

      Any commercial enterprise is subsidized by shareholders at first. I’m not a fan of the publicly-funded charging stations; all that does is make people mad.

      The commercial for-profit EV charging companies price the product very high, so I doubt they’re losing money. A complete fillup of my Ioniq at a local Level 3 charger would cost me about $17; I can do it at home for about $4.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Good read on magical thinking
    https://www.manhattan-institute.org/green-energy-revolution-near-impossible

  • avatar

    Is it the same country that takes pride in making gas guzzling monsters and land yachts like RR, Bentley, Land Rover, Jaguar?


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  • slavuta: Really greaT1. But if it costs more than $30K, why bother?

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