Audi Ups Its Wagon Tease Game

audi ups its wagon tease game

Despite wagons facing a growing unpopularity that rivals that of free speech, Audi continues winking and nudging at North America, sneakily hinting that the king of all long-roofs might make its way to this side of the Atlantic.

There, it could see dozens, perhaps even hundreds of orders. Cynical? Perhaps, but a niche pocket of enthusiasm does greet any mention of the A6 Avant midsize wagon and its upcoming, beastly RS 6 Avant performance variant. Believed to pack a twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 and a boatload of horsepower, the next-generation RS 6 launches for the 2020 model year, but it remains to be seen whether any of these wagons arrive on these shores.

Certainly, Audi wants fans to think they will.

Audi embarked on its teaser campaign earlier this year, and this past week brought a new salvo of speculation:

It’s rarely been seen in America. pic.twitter.com/iptIyUZuCE

— Audi (@Audi) August 15, 2019

The first generation RS 6 Avant. Was never available in Canada 🇨🇦. pic.twitter.com/rv1leHlRsN

— Audi Canada (@AudiCanada) August 17, 2019

Hmm, I wonder what they’re trying to get across?

While the larger of Audi’s wagons did once tempt U.S. dealership visitors, the only long-roof Audi passenger car currently on sale stateside is the smaller A4 Allroad, which gets a mild suspension lift to go with its body cladding. It’s a crossover-adjacent wagon, not unlike Buick’s Regal TourX.

Of course, there’s also an Allroad version of the fifth-generation A6 that launched in Europe last year, and it’s this model that’s seen as the most likely candidate for a boat trip. At last report, Audi officials in the U.S. haven’t given any of the A6 wagon variants a green light. Should the Avant, Allroad, or RS 6 make the trip, it wouldn’t face much competition in its micro-segment.

Wagons are flirting with extinction in North America. While Jaguar’s XF Sportbrake will remain in the brand’s U.S. lineup for 2020, its future looks grim, what with Jag culling unpopular car configurations. The next-gen BMW 3 Series, introduced for the 2020 model year, sees the wagon variant drop from U.S. order books. Adding to the bloodbath, Volkswagen recently announced the death of its Golf Sportwagen and Alltrack.

That leaves Subaru, Volvo, the aforementioned Buick, and Mercedes-Benz’s E-Class Estate to keep the A4 Allroad company.

It definitely looks like we’ll see some version of the A6 Avant here; if all of this teasing comes to naught, Audi deserves a slap. As for the next RS 6 Avant, rumored to boast between 650 and 700 horsepower, we’ll get our first glimpse of it at the Frankfurt auto show on September 10th.

[Images: Audi]

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  • Lichtronamo Lichtronamo on Aug 19, 2019

    I’m in Germany now and the A6 Avant is all over. It’s an impressive looking car. I’d be interested in seeing it in the US. Unfortunately, it would be a niche vehicle. The US is all in on CUVs and SUVs. There are popular here in Germany too, but estates and hatches still rule and mostly M-B, BMW, Audi, and VW. To a lesser extent Ford, Opel, Skoka and French brands. We are driving a M-B C-Class 220d estate. Very comfortable, lots of luggage space and easy to Cruze the Autobahn at 220kmh. Pedal to the floor it maxed out at 240kmh. It was fun watching the Porsche GT3 go past me like I wasn’t moving.

  • Cprescott Cprescott on Aug 19, 2019

    I love and value station wagons. Their utility and their "carness" makes them great products and those blasted CUV's and SUV's are bloated, can't see through them road masses of doggie poo.

  • FreedMike Back in the '70s, the one thing keeping consumers from buying more Datsuns was styling - these guys were bringing over some of the ugliest product imaginable. Remember the F10? As hard as I try to blot that rolling aberration from my memory, it comes back. So the name change to Nissan made sense, and happened right as they started bringing over good-looking product (like the Maxima that will be featured in this series). They made a pretty clean break.
  • Flowerplough Liability - Autonomous vehicles must be programmed to make life-ending decisions, and who wants to risk that? Hit the moose or dive into the steep grassy ditch? Ram the sudden pile up that is occurring mere feet in front of the bumper or scan the oncoming lane and swing left? Ram the rogue machine that suddenly swung into my lane, head on, or hop up onto the sidewalk and maybe bump a pedestrian? With no driver involved, Ford/Volkswagen or GM or whomever will bear full responsibility and, in America, be ambulance-chaser sued into bankruptcy and extinction in well under a decade. Or maybe the yuge corporations will get special, good-faith, immunity laws, nation-wide? Yeah, that's the ticket.
  • FreedMike It's not that consumers wouldn't want this tech in theory - I think they would. Honestly, the idea of a car that can take over the truly tedious driving stuff that drives me bonkers - like sitting in traffic - appeals to me. But there's no way I'd put my property and my life in the hands of tech that's clearly not ready for prime time, and neither would the majority of other drivers. If they want this tech to sell, they need to get it right.
  • TitaniumZ Of course they are starting to "sour" on the idea. That's what happens when cars start to drive better than people. Humanpilots mostly suck and make bad decisions.
  • Inside Looking Out Why not buy Bronco and call it Defender? Who will notice?
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