2020 Chrysler Voyager's Price Undercuts Today's Pacifica, but Only Just

Steph Willems
by Steph Willems

It’ll be a different story when the 2020 model year arrives at Chrysler, at which point a large pricing gap will open up between the brand’s Pacifica minivan and the newly-arrived Voyager. The Voyager name, as you may recall, has been dusted off in order to serve as a stepping stone to the Pacifica.

It’s the same vehicle, to be sure, but one which replaces the former Pacifica L and LX at the bottom of the minivan totem pole. Here’s how the pricing breaks down between the two family-friendly siblings.

Thanks to order guides seen by Cars Direct, we now know that the cheapest Pacifica available for 2020 — the Touring model — starts at $34,990 after destination, or the same price as this year’s Touring Plus. The 2020 Pacifica Touring L begins at $38,240, followed by loftier prices for the Touring L Plus, Limited, and Hybrid offerings. Give up on your dreams of a bargain basement Voyager hybrid right now, as well as your hopes for finding automatic emergency braking anywhere in this stripped-down model.

From the lowliest Pacifica to the lowliest Voyager is a journey of $6,260. That base Voyager L, which may soon become a replacement for the the entry-level Dodge Grand Caravan SE (to say nothing of the rest of the GC line), carries a price tag of $28,480 after destination. If you’re curious, that’s a drop of $250 from 2019’s Pacifica L.

Three Voyager trims will be on offer: L, LX, and the fleet-only LXi. Moving up to the LX will set a thrifty buyer back $31,290 after destination, which happens to be — you guessed it — $250 less than a 2019 Pacifica LX.

It also happens to be $245 less than a 2019 Grand Caravan SE (keeping in mind that there’s cash on the hood of the GC almost everywhere; the same goes for the entry-level Pacificas, and to a greater degree). The GC’s fate, at this point, is unclear, but it’s not looking good for the Child of Iacocca.

Will splitting the Pacifica into two distinctive model lines change the trajectory of Chrysler’s minivan fortunes? That also remains to be seen, though this writer suspects you’ve already arrived at a conclusion of your own. Through the first half of 2019, Pacifica sales shrunk 23 percent, followed not far behind by the GC’s 17 percent sales drop.

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

Steph Willems
Steph Willems

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  • PrincipalDan PrincipalDan on Aug 07, 2019

    Still going to be interesting to see how used prices on say a Voyager LXi compares to a similar trim Pacifica that has all of the Voyager's features plus emergency braking and adaptive cruise. Those LXis will be thick on the ground at Carmax by 2022 or so.

  • Sckid213 Sckid213 on Aug 07, 2019

    I love how Chrysler still pulls this "different nameplates on the same vehicle" stuff. It's so...retro. As a kid who grew up mostly in the '90s, I was baffled when the LH cars came out and the LHS and New Yorker were the exact same vehicle. I was familiar with badge engineering between BRANDS (e.g., Caravan vs. Voyager), but not within the same INDIVIDUAL MODEL. There was barely an Internet back then, so it took some research to figure out such "single-model badge engineering" used to be more common in the past. It's the throwback 2020's at FCA!

  • Mike Some Evs are hitting their 3 year lease residual values in 6 months.
  • Tassos Jong-iL I am just here for the beer! (did I say it right?)
  • El scotto Tim, to be tactful I think a great many of us would like a transcript of TTAC's podcast. 90 minutes is just too long for most of us to listen. -evil El Scotto kicking in- The blog at best provides amusement, 90 minutes is just too much. Way too much.
  • TooManyCars VoGhost; I was referring more to the Canadian context, but the same graft is occurring in the US of A and Europe. Political affiliation appears to be irrelevant.
  • The Oracle Going to see a lot of corporations migrating out of Delaware as the state of incorporation. Musk sets trends, he doesn’t follow them.
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