By on August 5, 2019

2019 Toyota Avalon front quarter

2019 Toyota Avalon Touring

3.5-liter V6, DOHC (301 hp @ 6600 rpm, 267 lb-ft. @ 4700 rpm)

Eight-speed automatic transmission, front-wheel drive

22 city / 31 highway / 25 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

10.9 city / 7.6 highway / 9.4 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

25.9 (observed mileage, MPG)

Base Price: $43,120 US / $49,666 CAD

As Tested: $44,913 US/ $49,921 CAD

Prices include $920 destination charge in the United States and $1877 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

You’ve seen the type. The solo diner, eating while working through emails at the restaurant or FaceTiming with their kids while in the lobby of the Hampton Inn out by the interstate. The salespeople, making the wheels of commerce and commission turn with each mile glued to the windshield, travelling the highways in search of the next big sale.

These professional drivers don’t need a CDL, though many log enough miles in a year to rival some truckers. They need a comfortable, dependable steed that doesn’t warrant a second thought – it just does exactly what they need.

While many Willy Lomans have moved to midsized crossovers for their work vehicles, there is something comforting and familiar to a big sedan for slogging multiple hours on the highway. Had I had a choice back when I was out on the road for work, something like this 2019 Toyota Avalon would have been ideal. A trunk, hiding whatever samples I was carrying from prying eyes, is something you don’t get in some me-too crossover.

2019 Toyota Avalon profile

Aside from the grille, this is an attractive sedan. I look forward to the refresh in a couple years when (God willing) someone within Toyota decides their flagship sedan shouldn’t look like a Big Mouth Billy Bass wall plaque gnawing on an eggcrate. Worse yet, the shut line of the hood leaves a distracting strip of sheetmetal above that grille. I normally prefer more distinctive colors on a car, but this is one situation where dark, muted hues will go a long way in hiding the Avalon’s massive mouth.

2019 Toyota Avalon front

I dig, however, the subtle sporty touches elsewhere. The gloss black mirrors and decklid spoiler sound like they would be rather downmarket – I recall the entry trim of my mother’s 1990 Corolla having a single driver’s side mirror clad in flat black plastic. Here, it’s beautifully done, and will impress any clients our hero needs to take to dinner.

2019 Toyota Avalon rear

The interior is similarly classy. While the materials are clearly a step down in quality from the similar Lexus ES, I’d wager that the Softex material will be easier to live with over the long haul. Front seat comfort is impressive for long days on the turnpike. Rear seats take advantage of the 1.8 inch increase in wheelbase from the Camry, as improbably the Avalon has 2.3 inches of additional rear legroom. Those clients will not struggle to get comfortable.

2019 Toyota Avalon front seat

The 16.1 cubic feet of trunk space is both deep and wide, allowing for plenty of options on arranging cargo. I know that when I was on the road, I’d have boxes of sample materials, a crate of catalogs, a suitcase, and a set of golf clubs in the tail of my company-provided car – and any extra space was always welcome.

2019 Toyota Avalon rear seat

Driving the Avalon brings to mind one word – relaxed. While the big V6 does indeed produce 301 horsepower, it’s power that will never be used to its full potential. Other than pulling away from toll booths and other general merging needs, this engine will be loafing in as high a gear as possible under 2,000 rpm. In those situations, all is quiet and calm. Road and wind noise is subdued, except when an unusually textured road allows the tires to transmit odd hums into the cabin. The ride is plush and composed, giving respite to the tired driver.

2019 Toyota Avalon center stack

As I mentioned it before, some might ask why one would buy this over the very similar Lexus ES. Both are excellent cars with very similar mechanical bits and comfort features. Lexus, for the extra money, does offer real leather seats (available on the Avalon Limited model, should one choose) and a typically better dealership experience. For my money – and for our imaginary salesperson looking to buy a car to make the job easier – I’d point at the Toyota Avalon due to one simple feature: the infotainment controls.

2019 Toyota Avalon interior

The Toyota uses a simple touchscreen, while the Lexus uses a touchpad on the console. When I was on the road, I often found myself stopping to scrawl in a notebook while on the phone. The real estate on the console where my right hand would naturally fall is ideal for taking notes, but in the Lexus, it’s occupied by that touchpad. In that case, should you accidentally touch some buttons while writing, you could easily toggle navigation – or worse, hang up on that big client. The touchscreen in the Avalon will gather more fingerprints – sometimes smeared with french fry grease – but that’s easy enough to wipe down when needed.

2019 Toyota Avalon rear quarter

Hire me to go out on the road, and I’m looking hard at an Avalon. I’d likely stick with this midrange Touring trim, adding the $1,150 Advanced Safety package that gives a bird’s eye view camera for street parking in unfamiliar cities, as well as rear cross-traffic braking. I’d add the $248 all weather floor liners and cargo tray, since salt from those errant french fries can be annoying to vacuum out of carpets. Paint it a nice deep blue – Parisian Night Pearl – to hide that grille.

2019 Toyota Avalon screenshot

Hitting the open road to chase sales isn’t glamorous. Beyond the driving, it’s a life of talking to reluctant buyers while managing indigestion from that cheap hotel continental breakfast (since management won’t let you put breakfast on your expense report). Making the miles as hassle-free as possible is paramount to these road warriors, and there are few cars that do it better than this Toyota Avalon.

2019 Toyota Avalon badge

[Images: © 2019 Chris Tonn/TTAC, screenshot courtesy Toyota.com]

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90 Comments on “2019 Toyota Avalon Touring – Road Warrior...”


  • avatar
    mmreeses

    up front I see a surgical mask or a certain form of undergarment that I can’t imagine away. maybe it isn’t so obvious in real life.

    your mileage may vary.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareidolia

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      The Toyota Avalon maxi-grille…Now with wings for extra protection!

      • 0 avatar
        JoeBrick

        Yup. It is pretty obvious, Good catch, m&mreeses, and and FlyersFan.
        Could be fixed with body-color paint and maybe some bondo, but shouldn’t have to.

    • 0 avatar
      SilverCoupe

      Does anyone make aftermarket pieces to attach on the fronts of the various Toyota and Lexus models to infll their snouts?
      They appear to be mostly solid with few cooling openings.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      While I admire Toyota for trying to get away from the “Bland-mobile” styling from years past, I just can’t get past the grill on this car. Even the Lexus spindle grill is a better execution of “Maw-grill” styling.
      This is the main reason I didn’t cross-shop this car against the LaCrosse I eventually purchased.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt Foley

      I think the grill looks like Three-Ball Charlie (the guy on the cover of the Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main St. with three pool balls in his mouth).

  • avatar
    Oreguy

    So the rest of front bumper/fascia is now optional equipment?

  • avatar
    jkross22

    This is the first new Toyota in a long time that I like. NA V6 requiring regular unleaded, regular transmission, roomy, great stereo by all accounts, roomy trunk and back seat, firmed up suspension means fewer back seat complaints, really cool interior center design with the HVAC and screen sweeping up….

    Here are the problems…..

    – No Android Auto – in 2019. And the built in screen fonts look like they’re from the Windows 95 era. Inexcusable.
    – FWD only. Come on, Yo. AWD or bust. Plus, what’s up with the drivetrain hump if it’s FWD?

    As a result of the above 2 points, Avalon is too expensive. Avalon should top out at 40k loaded. It’s 4-6k too expensive as is.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      As a counterpoint, I will NEVER consider a Subaru because they ALL have AWD. I live in coastal SoCal. I NEVER have need for AWD, and I don’t want to lose mpg or purchase price paying for hardware I don’t want or need.

      I imagine TOY would offer AWD on these if enough potential buyers shared your perspective on this…pretty sure this platform can support it –as used in Highlander I think….the engineer has been done, and the parts have been built.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        They will never offer AWD on models like this. Why offer AWD on sedans? It could potentially erode higher profit crossover sales. You want AWD, Toyota has an option for you, one that better suits their bottom line right across the lot that will cost you an extra 2 or 3 grand per additional inch of ground clearance. Adding AWD would increase sales of nearly every FWD sedan and many are already on platforms built for AWD, but profits come first.

        Every automaker is the same way. Absolutely shocked that Toyota would offer AWD on the Prius when the have a RAV4 hybrid and Highlander Hybrid. I think that has more to do with keeping the “Prius” as a brand name relevant though.

        • 0 avatar
          R Henry

          The outlier here, or course, is FCA, which offers AWD on all LX platform V6 equipped cars.

          • 0 avatar
            ponchoman49

            You can still get a 2019 Taurus or Fusion with AWD or a 2019 Lacrosse/Regal. Toyota not offering it here is one of several reasons sales are weak and continue to slide on these types of cars. People want it all. Perhaps this redesigned model saw a slight uptick in sales but i don’t care enough to look. The fact that any nearby Toyota dealer only has one or two in stock alongside 50-60 Camry’s is also telling.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          B/c more and more buyers of sedans in the snow belt want AWD (even if the tires make more of a difference) – which is why more automakers have been adding AWD to their midsize sedans.

          Nissan and Mazda have already done so and reportedly, the upcoming Optima will be getting available AWD.

          In addition, adding AWD isn’t simply a traction thing; it also allows automakers to make more powerful and better handling sport variants of their sedans than what FWD-drive can offer.

          Buyers interested in CUVs will still purchase CUVs; an automaker having an AWD sedan is not going to dissuade them from that.

          In fact, a good # of these buyers (in the sun belt) will opt for a FWD CUV.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I hear Subaru’s AWD is a must have in a mud slide

      • 0 avatar
        la834

        > I will NEVER consider a Subaru because they ALL have AWD

        except the BRZ.

      • 0 avatar
        chiefmonkey

        I live in New England, and I would never consider an AWD vehicle! It’s a complete waste. The only thing that will save you in the snow is a good pair of snow tires. The drivetrain doesn’t really matter…although yes RWD usually is worse even so equipped. Not to mention if you should puncture a tire in an AWD car, you are almost always required to replace all four rather than just the punctured one and the adjacent one.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I don’t know what your rain situation is there, but my Outback is a little beast in any water situation.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      Toyota makes what – 40,000 Avalons in a good year? How many more would they sell with AWD? Perhaps 10,000 more? Doesn’t seem to be worth their effort.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    $44K for FWD version.

    Oh wait, it’s a Toyota, that makes it OK. The similarly priced defunct Lacrosse at the same price point was…

    Faster, handled better, got about the same MPG in FWD format, the 2017 even had the exact same Aisin 8-speed automatic.

    Let the hate flow from you. Good…goood.

    All snark aside — the first point of having a trunk is one of the key reasons I am very reluctant to get a SUV as a rental sled. Most don’t come with a cargo cover which cripples what I can do while hauling my luggage, out for the world to see.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Didn’t you get your Lacrosse for 40% off? That’s the reason to get the Avalon instead, but I agree. The Avalon is too expensive for what it is.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @jkross22

        Lightly used (one year old) — would have stickered for $51K (AWD, performance package, sunroof, pearl paint, etc. etc.) which is a bridge too far for a LaCrosse, or an Avalon for that matter. Heck at $44K for the Avalon the bigger competitor is the ES350 which starts at — $39.5K.

        I’m just pointing out the hypocrisy of the B&B.

        You can spend $44K on a Toyota, and get the Toyota experience or…

        You can spend $40K (admittedly with less equipment) on the platform sharing and part sharing Lexus ES350 and get the Lexus, warranty and experience, with the exact same wheelbase, engine under the hood, and tramsission.

        This was one of the central arguments against the Lacrosse – why buy the Lacrosse when you can get the Impala unless you want AWD, and why buy the Cadillac XTS when you can get a Lacrosse (or in my view, why buy the XTS at all unless you are livery).

        You don’t have to squint hard to go, “does not compute.”

        Reminder – just like Lexus vs. Toyota and Buick vs. Chevrolet, the Lacrosse gets a longer warranty too (Lexus service is much better than Buick, no arguments here)

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          TBH I’ve had better service from my local Toyota dealer, which did a very nice job diagnosing and fixing an odd buzz on my Highlander Hybrid, than either of my two closest Lexus dealers. But that’s probably the exception.

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          “why buy the XTS at all unless you are livery)”

          Magnetic Ride Control. You’re at near S class levels of ride quality and it’s standard on the XTS. IIRC that feature isn’t available on the Buick or the Chevy version.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Are you trying to talk yourself down from a ledge? I’m sorry that nobody else shares your delusions about a Buick being a better performer than this Toyota, but I don’t think that’s the source of your issues. The Lacrosse is gone because it didn’t sell well enough in China, the only place left where a meaningful number of buyers don’t know better than to buy a Buick.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        You must live a sad life to waste so much energy attempting to troll me. I’m sure 8chan will be up and running again by the end of the day.

        I didn’t even bother to read what you wrote – I scroll past your name but alas here you are, replying to me again.

        Have the last word – it is important to you.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        AtlasToddF1,

        The Lacrosse is still sold in China (actually facelifted there this year). It is just gone in North America.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          I guess China isn’t all bad when it is taking Buicks away from the US market instead of exporting Buicks to the US market. I see that the Lacrosse price range in China mirrors the Avalon price range in the US; thirty-six to forty-three thousand dollars. Much of the comment section is focused on the price of an Avalon Touring. For thirty-five and change, the XLE isn’t a bad value.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Uhh, the LaCrosee has beaten the ES in comparison tests.

        For instance –

        “Autotrader’s Advice

        Your friends, family and neighbors will probably be more impressed by a new Lexus ES 350 in your garage. Besides its arguably more appealing badge, it’s impeccably made and quite obviously worthy of the term “luxury car.” However, in many respects, such as driving dynamics, fuel economy, value, and technology, the 2017 Buick LaCrosse outdoes it. It’s been a long time since Buick was seriously in the luxury game, but this new LaCrosse could change that. It at least deserves a chance.”

        Cars.com

        “Finish Line

        If luxury trimmings are your priority, look at the Lexus. But as an overall package the LaCrosse, hits more points.”

        So you’re clearly WRONG on the “no one else” claim.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          How many LaCrosses did those whores buy? Not enough to keep it on the market. This Avalon doesn’t have the touch pad that is the biggest flaw in any Lexus. Your argument is a straw-man that fails on every level.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Yeah, that Touchpad is really bad, but the low res screen and really awful graphics in the Avalon look completely out of place in a 40k car. Toyota needs to get that cleaned up.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Part of the LaCrosse’s issue was that it had in-house competition at opposite ends of the spectrum.

            The Regal at the lower-end and the Cadillac XTS at the higher-end.

            (In addition, GM buyers were even more inclined to switch to CUVs, SUVs and pick-ups.)

            Still, the LaCrosse managed to sell 58.5k in 2011 (which is more than what Lexus ES sold in 2016, 2017 and 2018) w/ sales only starting to really drop around 2016.

            The ES, sharing its platform w/ the Avalon now instead of the Camry, should really be priced in the MID-size segment (along w/ the XTS, RLX and Conti) instead of the COMPACT segment, but Toyota knew that doing so would cost them in sales.

            So congrats! Lexus is the “queen” at selling a full-size FWD sedan at compact prices.

            Too bad they can’t seem to reverse declining sales of their 3 RWD sedans (which may soon dwindle down to 2 models).

          • 0 avatar
            volvo

            “The ES, sharing its platform w/ the Avalon now instead of the Camry, should really be priced in the MID-size segment (along w/ the XTS, RLX and Conti) instead of the COMPACT segment, but Toyota knew that doing so would cost them in sales.”

            According to Toyota TNGA-K (GA-K) is the current platform the Camry, Avalon and ES are built on.

            “Too bad they can’t seem to reverse declining sales of their 3 RWD sedans (which may soon dwindle down to 2 models).”

            Price baby price. The LS and LC are now priced at a level that many will pay a little more for the German badge even though the TCO will be much less for the Lexus.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The Lacrosse was a good car. I haven’t driven a TNGA Avalon, but I consider the Buick superior to what Toyota offered through 2018. My only issue was the undefeatable stop/start, but GM is (slowly) adding an “off” button to their vehicles.

  • avatar
    WalthamDan

    Looking at the grille head on, it looks like the profile of the Flintstone’s rock car.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Glad you found your perfect road “salesman car” The Avalon does look like it would be good for that

  • avatar
    R Henry

    –uhm, that was ME at the Hampton…scarfing the Froot Loops and self-made Belgian Waffle.

    Since my territory is too large for driving from home most of the time, my “Salesman Car” is most often a rental Dodge Grand Caravan. Seems every rental agency uses those as the default “upgrade” if they don’t have the “standard car” you reserved.–BTW, GC is a fine Salesman Car too….I like the seat comfort A LOT and the head and shoulder room is great for this 6ft 225lb piece of meat.

  • avatar
    jmo

    “Lexus, for the extra money, does offer real leather seats (available on the Avalon Limited model, should one choose) and a typically better dealership experience.”

    What’s the decibel level at 70 for a 2019 Avalon vs. a 2019 ES? I assume it’s significantly lower and with the Lexus you don’t get the “unusually textured road allows the tires to transmit odd hums into the cabin.”

    A quick trip to Lexus.com says the mid trim ES 350 Luxury is $45,775 and the top of the line Ultra Luxury trim is $49,575.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I posted similar above. At $44K sticker this doesn’t make sense. The ES350 is on the same platform as the Avalon. Better materials, different tuning, longer warranty, and a much better service experience.

      Either the ES350 is a bargain or the Avalon is overpriced (at these equipment levels)

      Avalon > ES350

      Impala > XTS

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        “At $44K sticker this doesn’t make sense.”

        If it’s $6k cheaper than a comparable ES then IIRC that’s the traditional bump over the Toyota platform mate. A top of the line (non-hybrid non-F Sport) RX is $51k vs. $47k for a Highlander.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Equipment choices may change this equation. For a couple of years (2014-15) the base RX hybrid was actually cheaper than a Highlander Hybrid, because Toyota was only selling the latter in full-boat Limited and Limited Platinum trims, while the former was available with almost any combination of RX options.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        APaGtth,

        Completely with you on the pricing for Avalon. The Lexus is priced well, but Toyota appears to be turning Avalon into their version of the Maxima…. bloody terrible especially considering they’re finally getting it right.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          Except that the Avalon really starts with the XLE at $36K with destination. They make quite a bit of sense at that price if it’s a big high quality sedan that you want.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Avalon might end up in that coveted “Last Man Standing” position in the Full Size Sedan world.

    GM and Ford have taken themselves out of the running willingly.

    We’ll see how much longer the LX platform can solider on over at FCA.

    Maxima is smaller inside than the Altima.

    Everybody forgets the Cadenza exists.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      The other advantage the Avalon has is the chassis is used for the ES350. Even as the class withers away it is easier to justify keeping production going.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        As senior citizens begin to wither away, I think the ES may as well.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          The SUV craze will eventually fade. We’ve seen these shifts before. The minivan killed the station wagon, the SUV killed the minivan, the CUV is killing the sedan…

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Whatever the next body style is, I think higher ride height is here to stay. Too many people like it for it to fade. So far, the few attempts at high-riding 3-box cars have failed, but it’s probably just a matter of time before one succeeds.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            @dal20402 as usual with you, I tend to agree.

            I know in the winter months in soggy Seattle I far prefer to drive my GMT900 over the Lacrosse, or even my wife’s Forester (2006 version). The lower ride height means every CUV, SUV and truck on the road is blinding me with their headlights make it near impossible to see in urban settings at night. Toss in militant cyclists and pedestrians in head-to-toe black and it is just a nightmare. Even though the GMT900 headlights are crap, I can still see more because I don’t have LEDs in my face.

            I do like being “higher up” from a forward vision stand point. I get it, I’m a late Gen X dinosaur with dimming eyes – I’ll always have a soft spot for a big squishy sedan.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I feel the same way at night (even though, out of pure self-defense, the very bright LED headlight on my bicycle is probably an offender). I wonder how many pedestrians and cyclists could be saved with consistent headlight height that limited glare into drivers’ eyes.

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            @dal: WRT high riding cars: They will evolve from our current CUVs. The CUVs will get lower (due to CAFE standards) but retain the styling cues of CUVs.

            Also, I’m glad my bicycle headlight is bright enough to be an offender. I’m pretty sure it’s saved my life several times.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            Ride height is one thing, being able see out of the vehicle is the other half of the equation. Squished sedans with sloping roof lines mean tiny windows in every direction. Not so in a crossover. If CAFE would ease off on the MPG requirements for sedans, they might grow enough to accommodate windows again.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            I read a comment a while back that reminds of this argument. (It might have even been here, I don’t remember)

            The poster said that cars have come full circle. Look at the Model T. Basically the first crossover. Similar ride height. Large diameter wheels with small rubber band tires. Higher and vertical seating position. They’re pretty much the same.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          It’s not only senior citizens who value the value proposition of the ES.

          Plus, the ES is one of Lexus’ best sellers in China.

          Now, Lexus’ RWD sedans (including the LS) otoh…

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    My wife and I bought a 2015 Avalone XLE new and we love it. Rides good, plenty of room, excellent drive train, and the grill on ours is a lot smaller.

    We went thru the old Toyota vs Lexus thing when we bought ours. In my opinion, the higher up the trim level Avalon you go, the less compelling of an argument you have for an Avalon versus a Lexus. To me, the better comparison is on the lower end of the trim level. We initially looked at V6 Camrys, but the price delta between the top of the line Camry with V6 versus the entry level Avalon (XLE) made for a more convincing argument for the Avalon. The price difference was more than made up for more room, better ride, better materials, etc. Plus the XLE didn’t have a sunroof so it had more headroom.

    But, if I were looking at anything above an entry Avalon, I think I would be more inclined to go with Lexus (would never look at anything GM, ever).

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    I was going to ask, how this compares to an Impala.

    The Impala is 5-6 years old, so the Avalon should be at least as good.

    If the Lacrosse is an ‘improved Impala’, it’s plausible that it is almost as good, as good, or better than an Avalon.

    It does not have the brand equity.

    I am frankly shocked by the price of the Avalon. But I have that reaction in general with new cars (or trucks). I’m shocked by the MSRP on the Buick and Impala also.

    Now that GM is abandoning the segment, some Impala/LaCross buyers will wind up buying Avalons, not GM cross-overs, strengthening Toyota. When fads change and fuel efficiency is a bigger factor, Toyota will be even stronger, and GM will be weaker than it was.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      From 2017 to 2019 there was very little similarity between the Impala/XTS and Lacrosse.

      The Lacrosse was on a totally different platform with a different version of the 3.6 with different HP/torque numbers, different AWD system from the XTS, different transmission (the 2017 has the same Aisin 8-speed as the Lexus), different suspension, chassis, hardpoints, etc. etc.

      Impala/XTS was on Super Epsilon, Lacrosse was built on P2XX. In 2020 the Impala was supposed to switch to P2XX – the XTS was supposed to be put out to pasture but has a niche market with the livery/Uber/Lyft set.

      It all comes down to profit.

      P2XX is a stretched version of E2XX. E2XX is used on the Malibu, Regal, and XT4. C1XX is the crossover platform of E2XX (P2XX was stretched) and the XT5, Blazer, Acadia, Enclave, XT6, and Traverse are all built on that platform.

      Bottom line is GM could have kept building the Lacrosse for NA, with a sticker of $30K to $50K (depending on equipment, yes a base Lacrosse did sticker for $30K before cash on the hood), or they could turn resources to the Blazer on the same platform (essentially) with the same V6, the same AWD system, the same instrument panel, infotainment stack, HUD and electric brake switch gear (I think you get the point) and put a sticker price of $50K on the window. Ooooooooo, SUV, must be worth more.

      Profit.

  • avatar
    vvk

    That is one expensive Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      The base price is $35k and that’s a few grand less than the average new car price of $37k. It’s hard to call a few grand less than average “expensive.” Especially if you’re talking about a full size car with a standard V6.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        That 35k average is laughable. When you think of an average car, what comes to mind?

        CamCord, right? A mid-spec version of those cars is 27-28k. Fusions are much less and they’re also more ‘average’ in terms of broad perception. How about a base Passat for 25k, and the loaded R-Line is 30k. And no one is paying anywhere near those numbers for Passats.

        This crap about 35k being average has sounded to me like an attempt to upsell all of us on crap we don’t want/need. Either that or someone’s counting leasing the same as a car being sold.

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          “That 35k average is laughable. When you think of an average car, what comes to mind?

          CamCord, right?”

          Did you just step out of a time machine? No a CamCord isn’t an average car. And F150, Ram, Highlander, Passport, Traverase, are average cars these days.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Options can lift up the price on an Avalon. My best friend’s 2015 Avalon Limited w/Touring option stickered for $46K+, and sold for <$45K out the door, tt&l included.

        He wrote a check for the full amount so there was no F&I involved, since he, too, is insured with USAA.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        I am just saying it is expensive for a Toyota.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        Try finding a 35-36k Avalon at any Toyota dealership. The only ones I have seen are 43-49K higher trim levels. The same goes for the LaCrosse. Never ever saw a 30K base model. Did see a few 4 cylinder 35k Preferred versions but most were over 40K and AWD.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I really like the Avalon, but this is no longer the Japanese Buick. It is just as hard to get in and out as the new Camry and Accord. Same butt on the road low driving position. I think they are losing some of their main clientele with bad knees and hips. They are going after the 40 year olds now.

  • avatar
    AA610

    I wanted to like the Avalon. But when i see it in person, there’s too much car in front of the front wheel, and behind the rear wheel.. looks too long to me (That’s what she said)

  • avatar
    IBx1

    My favorite part of that abominable front bumper is how it’s only the very bottom 4″ strip of it that’s actually open for airflow.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Don’t crucify me…I actually like the design and the big grille (although I agree with you about the odd cutline).

  • avatar
    spookiness

    “shut line”
    Thank you for adding this to my vocabulary! The lack of attention to this design detail drives me nuts. Toyota and Hyundai have been the worst offenders.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I don’t know if that’s fair. Everyone tried to select shut lines that complemented styling elements right up until Chris Bangle started putting coffin lids and flame surfacing on BMWs.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    What is amazing is not that this Avalon is disgusting looking. What is amazing is that Toyota doesn’t listen to people who say this Avalon is disgusting.

    Perhaps because Avalons sell to retirement age folks with bad eye sight, but my there is nothing about this vehicle that can appeal to any one with good eye sight, irrespective of quality which I know will be perfect.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    If I compare this 2019 Toyota Avalon Touring to, say, a 2005 Toyota Avalon XLS, it appears that even Toyota has lost the plot.

    (Planning a dealer visit to confirm my impressions in person.)

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Stopped by the Toyota dealer this evening. Sat in the front, sat in the back, popped the hood, popped the trunk. Middle of the showroom floor. (No one at the dealership acknowledged my presence in any way whatsoever, so the traditional dealer model is definitely working for Toyota… lol.)

      – The trunk size is not as compromised as I thought judging by the pictures, but the trunk opening is definitely small with a strange load angle (because of the truncated rear deck).
      – The roofline shape is all wrong – rear seat entry/egress would be difficult for the people I would be carrying, when I carry people.
      – My tooth fillings started to ache a little looking at the sidewall.
      – The trim level I sat in didn’t have that leatherette garbage, but ewwww.
      – The center console is way too bloated left-to-right and takes up space where my right leg and knee belong – this is an absolute deal-breaker for me.
      – Cramped feeling/poor visibility in general compared with the vehicle noted above.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        How to Kill your Flagship:

        – The guilty parties go on the record (the video is entitled “2019 Toyota Avalon: Bringing Avalon to Life” – but like all marketing, this is opposite-speak) – look at them closely – they know what they did:
        https://www.toyota.com/avalon/2019/photo-gallery/videos/1

        – The sales results (peaked in 2005):
        http://carsalesbase.com/us-car-sales-data/toyota/toyota-avalon/

  • avatar
    volvo

    The proposition here is that this car would serve Willy Loman well on his rounds.

    Well Willy if you want to purchase your own car go for it. But if I am your employer supplying a sedan of this size then you will get the keys to an entry level Camry supplied by the corporation.

  • avatar
    probert

    Fly and rent – save the pain and get a car you like for when you’re home in the arms of yer lovin wife.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    We have reached peak grill (maybe). That Avalon looks like it’s about to swallow a minnow.

  • avatar
    hamtrelvis

    Does anyone know whether the 2020 Lexus ES350 will have a touchscreen?

    The Lexus appeals to me more than the Avalon, but the 2019 model has the ‘spawn of satan’ touchpad that nobody wants. I’ve searched the web for news about next year’s model but could find nothing.


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