By on July 4, 2019

The realities of modern racing series are dominated by homologation rules and the balancing of performance between makes and models. As such, the racecar’s engines are sometimes detuned when compared the road-going car upon which they’re based.

In celebration of their 1966 Ferrari-beating LeMans win, Ford Performance wanted to offer its customers a de-restricted track-day version of the GT, which they’re calling the Mk II. With Multimatic, the designers of the Ford GT racecar and manufacturer of all Ford GTs, they threw the rule books out the window and set out to build the ultimate GT track car.

The road-going Ford GT puts out 650 horsepower from its 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6, but the GTE racecar is restricted to only 495 hp per current performance regulations. The GT Mk II pushes the envelope further, making 700 hp. There is a massive roof scoop to funnel air to coolers for the engine, clutches, and transmission. It even has a water-spray system for the charge air coolers so that it will always be able to make that 700 hp.

All the constraints to keep the GT street-legal and driveable have also been shelved. Gone is the adjustable ride height system. Only the lowest 70 mm track mode is in use for the Mk II. Track mode is the only calibration for the engine and 7-speed dual-clutch transmission. All the airbags are omitted, as is most of the rest of the interior.

In its place is a roll cage, bespoke Sparco seats with 6-point harnesses, a fire-suppression system, and MoTeC data acquisition system which doubles as a rear-view camera since the roof scoop blocks rearward visibility from the inside. The modified GT steering wheel has a quick-release to ease ingress and egress through the cage.

According to Brian Makse in his piece for Wheels.ca, the accompanying five-way adjustable Multimatic DSSV dampers have an adjustment range that “is less than half that of a professional racing damper, simply to avoid the end user getting lost in settings while configuring the suspension on their own.” Considering that the racing dampers generally have a tighter operating range than your average aftermarket product, it shouldn’t be possible for a customer to really get it wrong.

The GT Mk II features carbon-ceramic Brembo brakes, reducing unsprung weight and rotating mass while improving durability and performance. Rolling on 19-inch Michelin slick tires and unique forged wheels, the ABS system has been recalibrated to get the most out of the setup on the track.

As per Ford, the Mk II weighs only 3,064 pounds, over 200 pounds less than the road car. Not only that, but the Mk II also makes four-times the downforce of the road car and 400 pounds more than the GTE-spec racecar.

I can personally attest to the compromise in outright performance that is made for homologated race cars. I’m driving a shop-built Shelby GT350 in the NASA ST2 category for 5.2 Motorsports, which is still early in its development. Our car is 300 lbs heavier than the Multimatic-built Mustang GT4, running DOT-legal tires, and lacking much of their trick engineering development. However, my laptimes are solidly amid the times of the top IMSA GS teams at Mid-Ohio. That’s what 100 extra horsepower will do.

As for the GT Mk II, the 205 hp bump over the GTE racing version, along with 400 lbs of additional downforce, should make for an astonishing track car. At least for those who can extract its capabilities from behind the wheel.

Ford Performance and Multimatic are offering the ultimate expression of the GT’s performance potential to 45 lucky customer driver who can afford the $1.2 million cost of entry. Sale and support will be handled directly through Multimatic, who can help customers get the most out of their ownership experience of a GT Mk II. Let’s just hope that these don’t get stored away and their owners drive them as intended.

[Images: Ford]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

35 Comments on “Ford Celebrates Independence Day with Track-Only GT Mk II...”


  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Henry Ford would be so proud to have his name on a company that builds 45 cars for multi-millionaires.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    Another car where buyers can make 100% profit upon immediate re-sale…

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    As per the article all Ford GT’s are built in the Multimatic facility in Markham Ontario. Which is a ‘suburb’ bordering on the north-east of Toronto.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I was right about more turbo whack but wrong about the central seating. Apologies, all.

  • avatar

    The Ford GT is one of my favorite racing machines. This one looks wonderful. With “coolness” comes cost unfortunately.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    As with all of these superfast track day specials, I just wonder how many rich guys have the skills to make use of a car that is faster than what the pro drivers are driving in IMSA.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Be nice if they fixed the defective engine.

    Those two cylinders have to be found

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      We don’t disagree about everything. My thoughts exactly.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        700 hp i9s not enough?

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          Not when a lowly Mustang is more powerful for a fraction of the cost.

          • 0 avatar
            FormerFF

            1: This car is considerably lighter and has a better power to weight ratio than said Mustang.

            2: Even a skilled track driver would be challenged to put all the power this car has to good use.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        For this kind of money, there should be no minivan-motor-sized compromises. There are tuner Mitsubishi Evos with over a thousand horsepower. The most powerful F1 engine to ever qualify for a race was built with a four cylinder junkyard block. So what? Have you ever heard a Ferrari V12? Ever felt the throttle response of a 100+ hp/liter naturally aspirated engine with a light flywheel? Turbos are for making performance with something pedestrian. Lipstick on a pig.

  • avatar
    formula m

    This car is pretty incredible. Lucky enough to witness laps when they were testing it here at Calabogie Motorsports Park outside of Ottawa in May and this car is blistering fast!!

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      Went to Google Maps and looked up Calabogie Motorsports Park. When you say “outside of Ottawa,” I believe you mean “middle of nowhere kinda near but kinda far from Ottawa! I love Canada to death, but you guys have a vastly different way of measuring distances than we do, with the exception of Texas! ;-)
      The place looks just stunning and if you want to run some tests away from prying eyes, that looks like one of the tracks to use. $20 says there’s a rundown, clapboard store/gas station with an old dog, an older guy, a rocking chair, and a long-standing warning about “not going down that old dirt road” next to that track.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    Curious what that canister is located in the passenger footwell – fire suppression?
    The Ford GT is one of the best designs to come out of Ford in a long time. This just cranked it up by a factor of 10. When these hit the auctions in 20 years, bet on rare Ferrari prices.
    Anthony, hate to disappoint (or state the obvious) but you know and the rest of us know that for this price, all of these GTs are getting stored in a climate controlled garage or warehouse never to touch a track, set a lap time, and hit redline. Such a waste…

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUPcDhqybeI

    Here it is around the track. They nailed the sound. Heads up (if you watch) – for some reason, the video starts out really quiet and then in the last 10-15 seconds of this 2 minute video, it’s like the sound editing went to all hell and they added 50db! So, if you’re watching at work, be ready!

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      i do like the sound of this car, but then I’ve always been fond of sixes.

      When you’re done listening to this, listen to the Porsche 911.2 RSR GTE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQ8riM4qNwE . Hard to believe that it’s only a six.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        Wow…that is stunning. I think I have my new ring tone and alarm clock right there! At full wail…gives me chills. Don’t have a chance yet to look it up – that Porsche naturally aspirated?
        Thank you for sharing that – that thing is a beast!

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          Yes, NA 4.0 flat 6. Coming to a racetrack near you in the Weathertech series.

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            And a day after your post:

            https://jalopnik.com/porsches-new-race-car-says-no-to-turbos-and-yes-to-side-1836148123

            The 2019-2020 car. There’s a change to a side exhaust and has lost some of that elemental shriek. Still NA though!

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        That Porsche does sound very nice. Meanwhile, it seems like the entire production of 991 GT2s sounds like 2-stroke Detroit Diesel powered garbage trucks when they pass me as I’m walking to Croatan. A Misubishi Eclipse with a fart-can is a Stradivarius by comparison.

  • avatar
    islander800

    As the Brits say, “Oh my word!”

    Henry I would be proud of his legacy and of the GT Mk. II, having set speed records himself with the “Ford 999”, over 110 years ago. This latest GT Mk. II is an engineering descendent of the Shelby-prepared Ford GT 40s that dominated Le Mans over 50 years ago.

    “True believers” within Ford should take a bow.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Note to Ms. Barra – this is what you build if you are serious about building a performance vehicle. Clearly you are clueless and your soon to be released C8 will once again show you are also blind.

    Maybe Mary can add a wing on her c8 and a bit or two of carbon fiber to wow us with its $100k price tag! (sarcasm).

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Lost in some of these discussions with something named EB, is the fact that Ford is not interested in the old ways that so many cling to. I remember that the fools at a GM blog constantly wanted v8 power and rear wheel drive on everything as if that was the benchmark of our era instead of one from the 1960’s. What point would Ford have just putting in a V-8 rather than to keep pushing their main driving force of ecoboost? Promoting old ways is a recipe for bankruptcy. I’d love to see Ford start work on an electric version to show Tesla that building fake luxury cars is for children – real performance out of an electric car does not have to resort to gimmicks and tablets impersonating instrument panels.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Lost in some of these discussion with something named EB, is the fact that Ford is not interested in the old ways that so many cling to. I remember that the fools at a GM blog constantly wanted v8 power and rear wheel drive on everything as if that was the benchmark of our era instead of one from the 1960’s. What point would Ford have just putting in a V-8 rather than to keep pushing their main driving force of ecoboost? Promoting old ways is a recipe for bankruptcy. I’d love to see Ford start work on an electric version to show Tesla that building fake luxury cars is for children – real performance out of an electric car does not have to resort to gimmicks and tablets impersonating instrument panels.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • cprescott: Lost in some of these discussion with something named EB, is the fact that Ford is not interested in the...
  • cprescott: Lost in some of these discussions with something named EB, is the fact that Ford is not interested in the...
  • cprescott: Note to Ms. Barra – this is what you build if you are serious about building a performance vehicle....
  • DenverMike: It’s a good 3 inches drop, over the previous Silverado/Sierra 4X4. It might be more, might be less,...
  • Lie2me: Good choice, Corey, a good example of how absurd the “Classic Car” market has become

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States