By on July 17, 2019

Subaru is upping the starting prices of the redesigned 2020 Outback crossover and Legacy sedan by a rather modest amount. The automaker was even confident enough to list the hikes in its own press release, when the industry standard is to simply announce the new MSRP and hope nobody bothers to check what last year’s model went for.

The 2020 Outback will start at $27,655 while the Legacy will begin at $23,645. According to Subaru, that’s an increase of $300 and $200, respectively — though the actual difference over last year’s models is a few bucks higher. Just negotiate a full tank of gas or a handful of air fresheners at the dealership if you feel you’re being slighted. 

Base models come with a 2.5-liter boxer engine, now with 182 hp and 176 pound-feet of torque — providing a slight, but welcome, improvement in overall grunt. XT trims upgrade the powerplant to a 2.4-liter turbo with 260 hp and 277 foot-pounds, replacing the 3.6-liter six-cylinder that used to be on offer.

All-wheel drive, torque vectoring, Subaru’s EyeSight safety system (adaptive cruise control with lane centering), and a continuously variable transmission remain standard. However, the CVT now comes with an 8-speed manual shift mode that mimics gear changes via paddle shifters. It’s the only transmission option for 2020.

The most basic of base models utilize a 7.0-inch multimedia screen, whereas every other trim option incorporates an 11.6-inch touch-screen. Connectivity options are robust, regardless of screen size, and includes both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

The Outback comes in seven flavors and parses out things like blind-spot detection, cross-traffic alerts, heated front seats, and keyless entry/start on the bottom end. As you climb the trim ladder, Subaru will begin issuing a power moonroof, upgraded 18-inch wheels, perforated leather-trimmed upholstery, heated rear seats, rear air vents, upgraded front seats (power adjustments), fancier interior materials, reverse automatic emergency braking, navigation, and more.

Legacy’s optional equipment is the same, separated into six trim levels, and only lacks the Outback’s new hands-free liftgate.

While you can’t have everything, much of what Subaru has on offer can be affixed to most models via numerous equipment packages. If you just want the nicer wheels or upgraded infotainment and a moonroof, you can have it. XT models deliver the larger engine and a few unique exterior and interior touches, like two-tone upholstery. But the rest of the content is more-or-less the same.

The trim breakdown for the Outback starts with $29,905 for the Premium, $34,455 for Limited and $38,355 for Touring. XT models start with the $35,905 Onyx (new), followed by the $38,755 Limited trim and $40,705 Touring.

Legacy models above base open with the $25,895 Premium trim, $27,845 Sport, and $30,645 Limited. The Limited XT starts at $35,095 while the Touring XT starts at $36,795.

All prices include destination. Assembly for both models are slated to commence later this month at Subaru’s Indiana plant. Sales should commence early in the fall.

 

[Images: Subaru]

 

 

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29 Comments on “2020 Subaru Outback and Legacy Pricing Announced...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Hey, maybe you can get a deal on one of the Outbacks Subaru had to scrap for faulty welds.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/business/autos/subaru-welding-fail-means-thousands-new-cars-are-headed-scrap-n1030316

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Geeze. I guess they covered this up as long as possible before the word got out. Should’ve used the Ford PowerShift script and they could’ve gotten away with it for years. They could certainly have gotten more than 20 into the hands of purchasers. LOL!

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      I m a big Subaru fan. But this is not good. If you are paying attention, this cant happen. Proper weld set up is not rocket science. But, then again, in the car plants for the last 15 years, beat and crush your suppliers for every last penny. Then the supplier cuts a corner or 2.

      Major fail.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I like this new Outback. But couldn’t they have designed a UI for the center stack that didn’t look like that of a 2006 flip phone?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Is the UI that much different from FCA’s U-Connect? That’s what I thought it resembled.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        No, the latest Uconnect 7 and 8.4-inch systems feature crisp, flat graphics, humanist typefaces, and minimal/subtle gradients. Even the earlier pre-2018 version, which had the skeuomorphic, photorealistic look, did so in an attractive manner.

        That’s a lot different from this Outback, whose UI just looks goofy…especially with the “glass” buttons.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Call me when they offer an inline engine again. No boxers for me.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Some of the hottest Porsches made their mark on Boxers.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        The worlds best motorcycles too.

        BMW.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Arial 4-Square comes to mind. I owned a basket case (no, really – I bought it in pieces from an English immigrant in San Diego, CA) that I managed to put together with a ton of help from my (also English) HS Shop teacher. Got an ‘A’ for the Semester!

          Would you believe I sanded the edges of the crankcase on a large sheet of glass with Emory paper to reduce the oil leakage?

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Many (most?) light aircraft spark-ignition reciprocating engines are boxers: 4- and 6-cylinder Continental and Lycoming engines are currently manufactured and have been in use successfully for many, many years. Must be a fairly reliable basic design to be used as frequently as it is – folks depend on them whilst defying gravity at one or two miles (or more) up above terra firma.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        You do know those aviation engines are air cooled and their heads are in unit with the cylinders, expressly because flat fours head gaskets aren’t something to trust your life with, right? Do you not know about engine design, or were you trying to mislead ignorant people into buying Subarus?

        https://cdn1.bigcommerce.com/server1000/42c83/product_images/uploaded_images/titan-520gtcut.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          You left out Rotax…whoops! A cylinder head for each jug. Also liquid-cooled, opposed piston engine for aviation. There, fixed it for ‘ya.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Do you mean those Rotax engines that come with warnings not to fly them anywhere a safe landing can’t be made? Good point. Only you can decide what your life is worth.

        • 0 avatar
          conundrum

          “expressly because flat fours head gaskets aren’t something to trust your life with, right?”

          Rubbish. More to do with with “when you have an air-cooled engions with cylinder head temps all over the place depending on load” you gotta be extra careful. And it was 1932 so shrink-fitting the head onto the barrel was about all they could come up with, just like on the radials.

          There’s no reason whatsover a liquid-cooled engine of any description, flat four, inline four, whatever, should have head gasket problems unless the detail design was defective. Wobbly aluminum pressure die-cast cylinders emerging from a none-too strong base, so called open-deck, and not enough development was the SOHC EJ25’s problem. The turbo version with more cylinder support has essentially never had a head gasket problem. Mine’s a dozen years old and never been touched.

          But what the hell do I know/ I’m just a mechanical engineer and you’re the self-appointed expert.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I spent 2017 and 2018 running a shop that worked on double digit numbers of Subarus each week, and I’ve nothing against people paying idiot taxes by choice. They were our cash cows. I would never recommend one to anybody, but the owner certainly did.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @bullnuke: Yes, I worked on opposed engines during my brief year in aviation mechanics’ school, back during the Reagan Administration. They’re great.

        As for the Subaru boxer – I hate the sound, they’re hard to service, hard to seal, and thirsty. IMO they offer no advantages in a modern car.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      Glad some of the people on this site done market automobiles. Subaru has increased sale just about every quarter for 10 years.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        “…70 percent of new Subaru vehicles are now the object of recalls or service campaigns within two years of being purchased, noting that the “permissible limit” should be around 10 percent.”

        https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2019/06/report-outlines-how-subaru-is-coping-with-quality-control-issues/

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    So…$35K to get the turbo in the Legacy? No thanks…

    • 0 avatar
      djsyndrome

      This; the price is a dealbreaker. I can see them not wanting to impinge on WRX sales by offering a cheaper, stripped down model (why can’t the Legacy Sport get the 2.4T?), but both Mazda and Honda have no trouble offering their uplevel turbo engines for about $4k less.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        I obviously havent sat in or driven a new Outback but I generally like the concept of the vehicle. However, when you consider that the base engine is class leading in slowness, the CVT and (at least in recent years) sort of ho-hum interiors…..$27k doesnt even seem like close to a bargain for a stripper version. I just feel like the pricing on so many vehicles is out of whack with reality, and this is a prime example.

        How Subaru can demand these prices on what I see as mostly average vehicles is beyond me. The art of marketing I guess.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      It’s all the greenweenie stuff that Subaru is doing to win sales. That costs money!

      This $35K price pop-up is one way to recoup some of that wasted money.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      That’s my initial gut reaction too, except that my 2007 LGT wagon had a sticker of around $32k. Granted there isn’t much of a power bump in these past 12 years, but the safety and content would be worth the price difference.
      But there’s no wagon, so there’s that too.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Our Regal TourX 2.0T with torque vectoring AWD was middle $20’s.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        Hey, Norm – the local Buick dealer will make you a great deal on one of the two TourX’s he has in stock for your second high-quality vehicle. Might have to air-up the tires and jump the battery on your choice. One (color black) has been there 13 months, the other (white) has only been there 11 short months. You could probably get one for $20k or less! Get ’em while they’re (not) hot!

        • 0 avatar
          Land Ark

          Don’t ask about leasing one though. I was offered $630/mo for an Essence.

          Last time I looked GM isn’t even offering leases on the TourX at all.

          (my IS300 is $354/mo with the same downpayment)

  • avatar
    djsyndrome

    “XT models deliver the larger engine”

    2.4 < 2.5

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Happy to see that the turbo is back. It’s more appropriate for this car than the reliable, smooth, but not especially strong 3.6.

    Since this is Seattle, and every car that’s not a Prius or Highlander is a Subaru of some sort, I’ll no doubt end up riding in one of these within a couple months of wide availability.

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