By on July 12, 2019

2020 Hyundai Palisade

Hyundai and sibling brand Kia were once known for being cheap, but not necessarily the best value. That’s because cheap and value aren’t always synonymous — especially when it comes to consumer products.

That’s changed over time. Both brands have mostly shed their reputation for crap quality and have been steadily offering up products that can compete with everyone else on that front while still offering value pricing.

Kia’s Telluride is an example of that — it’s a well-built machine with premium content available at a price that undercuts rivals like the redesigned Ford Explorer. Logically, it follows that the Hyundai Palisade would pursue a similar path, since it and the Telluride are strongly related.

(Full disclosure: Hyundai flew me to Idaho, offered a backpack and Google assistant I didn’t take, and fed and housed me for two nights.)

While these two crossovers may be related, the commonalities are mostly under the sheet metal. The Palisade gets curvier styling than the boxy Telluride, although both have sleek interior designs that are meant to give off the impression of looking expensive.

A 3.8-liter direct-injection V6 rests under the hood of all Palisades, and it makes 291 horsepower and 262 lb-ft of torque. Eight speeds are on offer from the automatic transmission and, while front-wheel drive is standard, all-wheel drive is available. The power numbers are the same as what Kia’s Telluride offers.

That doesn’t mean the Palisade is exactly the same as the Telluride on-road, but it’s close. Like the Telluride, acceleration is fine for commuting and cruising but won’t blow you away, the eight-speed holds on to higher gears even when you wish it wouldn’t, understeer shows up when you take a corner too quickly, and the ride is generally smooth.

2020 Hyundai Palisade

That’s not to say everything is the same. The steering feels just as firm as in the Kia, but feedback is a tad more natural. There’s also less body roll and float, and the Palisade feels a tad more buttoned-down on the road. A Hyundai engineer told me that the spring and damper rates are different than the Telluride’s, and that Sachs dampers, as opposed to Mando, are Hyundai’s dampers of choice.

Drivers can operate the Palisade in sport, smart, comfort, eco, or snow drive modes. You can also lock in AWD. Various modes provide different FWD/AWD splits, with some, such as sport, smart, and snow allowing 50/50, depending on conditions. Outdoorsy types, take note: The Palisade handles gravel roads just fine, and you can even get a little slide action. Palisade offers an auto-leveling rear suspension.

2020 Hyundai Palisade

I like the Palisade’s curvier look better than the boxy Telluride, although it’s not like I found the Telluride to be ugly. Inside, I miss the stylish grab handles from the Kia, but I prefer the wraparound upper dash — the infotainment system isn’t tacked-on like an afterthought here. The available digital gauge cluster is also good-looking.

Materials feel class appropriate and look a bit upscale, at least in the upper trims. The push-button shifter isn’t for everyone, while on the other hand, the swath of buttons below the infotainment system and between the radio knobs is cleanly laid out. There’s a nice pass-thru underneath the shifter and drive-mode selector knob.

Palisade seats seven or eight, and I got my tall frame into and out of the third row without being too ungraceful about it. That third row isn’t really meant for adults, but it could be used for grownups in a pinch, and power folding third-row seats are available, along with second-row seats that can be manipulated with one touch. Available roof vents are intended to make life in the rear a little more comfortable.

2020 Hyundai Palisade

Family-friendly available features include wireless cell-phone charging, second-row cooled seats, seven USB ports, an in-car intercom system, and audio that can be muted in the back roads to allow kids (or grandparents) the chance to nod off while you rock out.

Other available or standard features across the lineup (trims are SE, SEL, and Limited) include: forward-collision-avoidance assist with pedestrian detection, blind-spot collision-avoidance assist, lane-following assist, high-beam assist, driver-attention warning, safe-exit assist, smart cruise control with stop and go, and rear cross-traffic collision-avoidance assist.

2020 Hyundai Palisade

There’s more: trailer-sway control, sunroof, dual sunroof, body-color rear spoiler, hands-free liftgate, heated front seats, cooled front seats, leather seats, heated second-row seats, captain’s chairs, underfloor storage, heated steering wheel, keyless entry and starting, dual-zone climate control, Bluetooth, head-up display, premium audio, navigation, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and Blue Link connected-car system.

Palisade shares its wheelbase length with Telluride, and it’s a smidgen shorter in length, narrower, and shorter in height than the Kia (it’s a smidgen shorter than the pricier redesigned Ford Explorer). It offers more front legroom, but a bit less headroom throughout. Middle- and third-row legroom is the same. Curb weights for both vehicles vary from trim to trim but remain within spitting difference of each other. Like the Kia, the Palisade can tow 5,000 pounds.

2020 Hyundai Palisade

Fuel economy is listed at 19 mpg city/26 mpg highway/22 mpg combined with front-wheel drive and 19/24/21 with all-wheel drive.

Pricing is as follows: $31,550 for the SE FWD, $33,500 for the SEL FWD, and $44,700 for the FWD Limited. All-wheel drive models are listed thus: $33,250 for the SE, $35,200 for the SEL, and $46,400 for the Limited. Destination fees are $1,095.

Both the Telluride and Palisade are Korean crossovers named after American towns (although the Kia is built in West Point, Georgia, while the Palisade is actually manufactured in South Korea), and both provide comfortable commuter rides and content at prices that are a relative bargain. Both are much better built than anything similar these brands have attempted in the past. Those shopping between the two will likely make their choice based on styling, although the Palisade is perhaps a tick better to drive.

Neither vehicle will blow doors off or blow car shopper’s minds. But both will blow out of showrooms in short order — high content quantity at the right price tends to do that.

[Images © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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92 Comments on “2020 Hyundai Palisade First Drive – Style Meets Value...”


  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    At least someone likes the Lexus spindle grill.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It’s the converse/opposite of the Lexus “spindle” grille, and basically the same hexagonal shaped grill that Hyundai has been using for ages (that Audi and a whole bunch of others also use, including Toyota on a few models), but in its latest iteration, having that “cascading effect”/curvature on the lower sides.

      Basically same shape that is on the Kona, Tucson and Santa Fe, but just bigger (and w/ that chrome surround which is a bit much at the bottom).

      Hyundai also actually did the “spindle” grille BEFORE Lexus on a concept (which, thank goodness, never went into production).

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Thing ain’t got no style with that grille…Can’t tell if it’s trying to emulate a full-sized pickup or a Lexus.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I’m firmly in the Telluride’s camp, in terms of styling. But this is good…really good. There’s a big jump in price between the SEL and Limited trims. I suspect the SEL will offer a bunch of optional packages, while the Limited will come with the full Monty.

    • 0 avatar
      427Cobra

      totally agree… the Palisade appears to have a slight edge in equipment and pricing, but the styling of the Telluride is just too compelling. Biggest downside (for me) on the Telluride is the black wheels on the upper trims… looks like it’s trying too hard. I like how the Telluride does NOT have derivative styling (like all of the Hyundai do). The Tiger-nose grill is enough familial resemblance… am just not crazy about the current trend of taking styling of one vehicle & scaling it up/down for other models. But whatever…

  • avatar
    R Henry

    This appears to be the right product…a bit late.

    Seeing how far Hyundai/Kia have come since the late ’80….and contrasting that with how far GM has fallen… is truly stupefying. THIS is what the Blazer should be: “high content quantity at the right price” The Blazer has neither.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I like the Kia myself much better than the Hyundai. With the new 2020 Toyota Highlander looking disturbing, and the Pilot kind of “meh”, Kia Telluride is slowly getting to be on top of all. I just wish Hyundai Motors went the Toyota way with the engine and build it direct/port injection, the best of both worlds.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    No thanks.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Dat grille, it will frighten the children

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    This is a better built vehicle than the FixOrRepairDaily Explorer, at tens of thousands less, with a proven reliable motor and transmission, to boot!

    FORD UNDER HACKETT BE HITTIN’ DAT CRACK PIPE HARD, YO!

    *Ford is consistently at almost the bottom of Consumer Reports Reliability Index, JUST BARELY above Jaguar-Land Rover-Range Rover.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Also, Guangzhou Motors LLC (GM) can’t touch this vehicle (and segment) with an 80 foot pole in terms of build quality, refinement, exterior or interior materials quality, NVH, reliability, etc etc etc AT ANY PRICE POINT.

  • avatar

    As someone who became an all Hyundai household in the past few years I am glad to see them succeed and churn out quality products. I have been impressed with our Hyundais for their easygoing manner, nice build quality, good materials, and fine reliability.

    Sure, they aren’t as sophisticated feeling over the road as the Honda and Acura they replaced, but they were a steal on the used market and 90% of the way there.

    I would happily buy another Hyundai.

    P.S.: That grille looks cartoonish in photos.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Very surprised these cousins are two entirely different production lines/locations. Surely 95% of the Korean built Hyundai version is “coming to America”.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Apparently the target market for full size crossovers is a third world dictator. Did the designers get overruled on the fender flag holders?

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    The Pallisade looks more pricey than the Telluride, but the Kia’s cleaner lines are easier on the eyes, especially out back where the Hyundai’s additional bumper-level lighting looks busy and ready to be broken by wayward shopping carts.

    Also, push button shifters must die, but at least the Hyundai’s setup looks somewhat logical and easy to reach.

  • avatar
    EX35

    Crummy engine, crummy under engineered chassis dynamics like almost every Korean car I’ve driven. No thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      EX35

      I have a 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe XL (Limited) and the 3.3 is a great powerful motor in this vehicle.

      BTW-the reviews on the “Korean” Genesis line doesn’t match up with what the professional reviews say.

      Which one of you is wrong?

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The opposite of what the automotive press says.

      The cousin, Kia Telluride, has been chosen as the best in the class by the majority of the automotive press.

      The V6 is no different from that offered in the Highlander or Pilot, but the Palisade has widely been praised for its ride and for driving like a smaller vehicle despite its heft (granted, not going to handle like a CX-9).

      If you’re going to TROLL, try doing a better job at it.

      • 0 avatar
        EX35

        I can recall the lovely “press” telling us proles how excellent the Kia stringer was at launch and how it was practically an Audi! A year later, after the Kia checks have long since been cashed, they tell us the car is mostly mediocre and cheaply built. Odd case.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Here you go – being WRONG again.

          The automotive press still sings praises for the Stinger (not that it doesn’t have its faults).

          Motor Trend recently posted a “Why I’d Buy It” feature on the Stinger, and were sad to see it go after their long-term testing period was over.

          Car & Driver has the Stinger ranked 5th (G70 is ranked 1st) in its Small/Entry-level luxury rankings (and is also an Editors’ Choice) – ahead of the likes of the A4, 3 Series, 4 Series, much less the Japanese (IS is ranked 17th).

          • 0 avatar
            EX35

            I’m gonna leave this right here. Sounds like a winner!

            “Largely, this is because the Stinger has gone from a quiet and often forgettable instrument of rapid travel to a rattling and shaking drama queen in less than 6000 miles.”

            https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a22993952/kia-stinger-gt-reliability-long-term-update/

            BTW, do you work for H/K? You have some weird obsession with defending the company every time they get even remotely criticized. You seem off.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I agree with C/D about the Stinger’s brakes. They are disappointing in general and definitely something that needs to be addressed in the refresh, if not immediately. I’ve had to take my car to the dealer to work on a brake vibration but I’m not expecting their fix to be permanent. The issue is fairly prevalent on the forums and most people agree it is the fault of the pads not the rotors (C/D’s dealer might just be part-cannoning). Unfortunately there aren’t many aftermarket front/rear pad options for the car right now.

            As far as rattles or paint issues go, I haven’t had any. It seems like this was an issue on first-batch cars (which most of these long-term testers were) but was solved fairly quickly.

            Obviously I have skin in the game, but I disagree with your call that the Stinger is “mostly mediocre and cheaply built”. It is still a quick, RWD car with a usable back seat & hatch that you can get for under $40K. And, mine is of **much** higher build quality than my Charger R/T was. I agree the press was too heavy with the anointing oils at launch, but I still consider it a good car and I have a fun time with it.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Didn’t I already state that the Stinger isn’t w/o its issues?

            Most 1st MY/early build models have “kinks” to work out and those for the Stinger are relatively minor; and in the case for long-term testers, they are early build press fleet vehicles, so they are more likely to have kinks.

            For instance, the hatch “rattle” is due to a too large-sized washer and Kia has addressed the problem (early adopters have fixed the problem on their own switching out the washers for a smaller size for less than a dollar from a hardware shop).

            As for the brakes, they should have used the Kia European OEM pads; the ones on the US-spec aren’t robust enough to handle more enthusiastic driving.

            Actually, my criticisms of the Stinger tend to go beyond w/ the publications state – the 2.0T base engine is entirely forgettable (that issue will soon be addressed, however, when it gets replaced by a new 2.5T) and the suspension tune is too soft (the G70 has the better tune) and needs a larger swaybar at the rear.

            But my biggest issue is w/ the interior; design-wise, it’s decent enough, but could improve the material quality at certain spots (and could use a larger LCD screen – should have gotten the 10.25″ from the start), as well as the USDM missing certain features that were available elsewhere (including Canada).

            The refreshed Cadenza shouldn’t have the nicer interior.

            Have absolutely no issue w/ legit criticisms, but your’s have hardly been such.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Speaking of C/D’s Editors’ Choice awardees…

          15 H/K/G models listed (including 2 Genesis); should be 16 once they update it to include the Palisade.

          Only 2 Toyotas and no Lexus models listed.

  • avatar
    jfb43

    This thing is completely mediocre and adequate, and it’s just what the people who buy these kinds of cars want.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I guess that settles it. Care to offer any comparative evidence to substantiate your insults?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        His brother-in-law has one and we all know what a dullard HE is

      • 0 avatar
        jfb43

        I believe the specs speak for themselves. It’s definitely not marketed to enthusiasts, but rather to a dad who has low-T or a mom who has 3.5 kids and a dog she needs to schlep around. Everything about it is middling, but I suppose it has a decent content package for the price (though you have to wonder where exactly they saved the money).

        I’m not saying this thing is particularly bad. I’m saying the whole segment is bad and this is just an average vehicle within the segment. Perfectly milquetoast and lackluster, and ideal for the shoppers I mentioned.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Well gosh, I wonder how you feel about minivans. Most of us drive this segment because it’s what we can afford with the most usable utility and maybe we don’t feel so frumpy with something that at least appears to be adventurous

          • 0 avatar
            jfb43

            You’re exactly the type of person who needs this vehicle, then. I’m not disputing that this vehicle has its merits and will undoubtedly sell well. I’m simply saying there’s nothing special about it – or any of the vehicles it competes with – and there’s no compelling reason to buy this over a Highlander, Traverse, CX-9, Ascent, Atlas, et al.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            And yet, the auto publications have consistently ranked the Palisade (or Telluride) over the Highlander, Ascent, Pilot, Atlas, etc.

            Sure, hard to go wrong in the segment – but right now, the Korean cousins offer the most complete packages.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            It’s almost like 2012, when Car and Driver was telling people to buy the Ford Focus over the Civic. How did that work out for the suckers who listened?

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Is that all you’ve got? lol

            It’s not just C/D, but MT, Autoweek, AutoGuide, Motorweek, Automobile, etc., not to mention the major YT reviewers – AoA, Redline, TSP, Throttle House, Savagegeese, Motoman, TFL, etc.

            But hey, maybe they are all “in” on it and only you and EX35 (lol) can see thru the “deception.”

            But what about CR – which long has been accused of being “in the pocket” of the Japanese, particularly Toyota/Lexus – even tho CR doesn’t even take testers from the automakers and instead, purchases their own test cars?

            Well, H/K have been getting HIGHER CR Road Test Scores than Toyota and by a good margin at that.

            Their road test scores have even been higher than that for Lexus.

            And much of the T/L lineups have moved onto the TNGA platform.

            H/K models (at least in the US) have yet to see any underpinned by the new N3 platform (the 1st being the new Sonata), as well as the new RWD platform for Genesis.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenn

      – And what most people who buy most cars want. They wouldn’t describe it as mediocre, but adequate, yes, and in the higher trim levels, luxurious.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    This Hyundai is the ugliest front end I’ve ever laid eyes on. I donno what the designers were thinking. “Let’s copy Lexus and slather more chrome on!!!” I’ll take the Telluride any day.

    And I checked out the Telluride. I loved the size and styling but was disappointed with the fake gray plastic trim all over the interior that’s made to look like brushed aluminum trim from a luxury car. The interior door handles felt especially cheap. Kia tried to bling up the interior with fake aluminum and wood trim and it comes across as a cheap knockoff of a range rover instead of it’s own unique quality design like u get with the pilot and highlander. Fake bling is not my thing but I can forgive it in the Telluride. Not in this ugly ass hyundai.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Yeah, b/c the Pilot and Highlander don’t have metal-looking plastic. lol

      And the interior (much less the exterior) doesn’t look like a Range Rover and if you’re going to list the Pilot an Highlander as examples of good interior design, than don’t have much credence.

      Now, something like the CX-9, otoh…

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This thing resembles the first gen Santa Fe. I’ll take the Telluride.

  • avatar
    geo

    This seems like a replacement for the VeraCruz, sort of a bigger, luxury version of the Santa Fe.

    It also reminds me of the Borrego.

    As someone who looked closely at a Hyundai/Kia crossovers (and the older Borrego), I’m pretty convinced that today’s Hyundai is the modern equivalent of 70s Japanese metal. Well-assembled garbage.

    As we perused lightly used Hyundais, I noticed problems ranging from timing chain issues, unsolvable dash lights, driveline clunks, bad suspension components, premature interior wear, and a generally cheap, junky feeling. They all felt like garbage covered by a nicely-designed interior and exterior.

    I ended up buying an old, low-k 9-7x 5.3i. Full of soul and solid.

    • 0 avatar
      EX35

      This. The used market generally tells the tale of woe for these under engineered crap boxes mascurading as luxury vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      You must have shopped the wrong lots. We’re on our 6th H/K product in the family in the last 10 years. 2 brand new, 2 lightly used, and 2 very used. All have been solid runners with none of the issues you saw.

      • 0 avatar
        EX35

        Everything I bring this up there are always outliers that come forward with anecdotes like yours, but they just seem to fly in the face of what family/friends have experienced and what I’ve seen/felt driving them

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          When it comes to Hyundai/Kia vehicles, I’m essentially an outsider looking in; I have never owned any and I have only driven one. However, I have had clients who own Hyundai/Kia and they have never had anything to bad to say about them.

          My one example was a 4-day rental while at a sporting event in the Las Vegas, Nevada area. That was a Hyundai Elantra, IIRC, and one thing I can say about that is that even at 145 horses, it was no weakling–it could get out of its own way, even with the automatic/CVT. It was also a reasonably comfortable ride for the short trips taken both on Vegas’ city streets and the freeway going through/past town. My only complaint was that the car constantly felt like the electric steering lagged the wheel input by a few fractions of a second… twitching back at me as though unwilling to accept the maneuver I had chosen but never refusing to go where I aimed. It was unsettling, but something I could have gotten used to over time. I’d never felt that with any other car before or since.

          So are they junk? I don’t think so. Honestly the apparent build quality was superior to anything I’ve seen from Ford in the last 20 years, even after having rented a Ford Focus a year after driving the Hyundai.

          Personally, I believe people’s prejudices are preventing them from realizing just how good many of the imports are. I would probably be driving a Hyundai Santa Cruz right now instead of a Chevy Colorado if they’d come out before I actually needed to buy a truck.

          • 0 avatar
            geo

            Vupline, I agree that Hyundai owners seem to be generally happy, which is why I originally sought to buy a Hyundai.

            I was highly disappointed in what I found in terms of quality, feel, and driving dynamics. I’m not saying I’ve done a scientific analysis of my Hyundai findings.

            I connect deeply with the vehicles I drive. At some level they become my friends and companions, and I’ve felt grief after parting with some. For me, connecting with a Hyundai would be impossible.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Geo: Everybody has their likes and dislikes, I cannot argue your feelings. My feelings towards Fords are similar to yours about Hyundai/Kia.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            My experience with Hyundais — I have friends and family with them — is that they’re good-looking, a good value, and absolutely knock it out of the park in terms of perceived quality (the feel of secondary controls, interior styling, shutlines, etc.) And also, that they’re decades behind the competition in terms of small-car driving dynamics. Crashy suspensions, wooden steering, thrashy engines. Get up into the Santa Fe price/size class and it’s a different story: the big four is fine, and a megadose of Novacain banishes both NVH and driving enjoyment.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “with anecdotes”
          “seem to fly in the face of what family/friends have experienced and what I’ve seen/felt driving them”

          Seems like all we’ve got here are competing anecdotes.

    • 0 avatar
      EX35

      Are those 9-7x 5.3s reliable? They are dirt cheap on the used market but I always assumed they were unreliable heaps because of Saab’s rep.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        They are pretty much as reliable as the GM vehicle that they are, but with the added bonus of a few unique parts that are hard to come by.

      • 0 avatar
        geo

        After converting the rear airbag suspension to coils (and doing the mass airflow sensor), the 9-7x been as good as any Trailblazer, which isn’t bad. Like most GMs, the bones are good and solid, while small interior and mechanical details could probably have used some attention (the opposite of Hyundai). It’s pretty nice to drive and surprisingly economical with the 5.3. I plan on keeping it for a while.

        Maybe with the Teluride, Hyundai has finally released a “truck” as good as a Trailblazer, which is pretty sad if this is how long it took.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      If Hyundais were so problematic, wouldn’t have as high of a loyalty rate that it has (repeat buyers).

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Honest to God. If Hyundais were any good, they’d have resale value by now. They wouldn’t be there with the Germans crowding the Detroit 3 out of the biggest depreciator list. Their success is one of marketing genius, like Subaru. I once turned down a potentially seven-figure job with a company that was calling itself Calusa that week. They made their money buying names of people who made bad decisions from credit agencies. I suspect H-K does the same.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Actually, based on data compiled by iSeeCars – the worst model when it comes to 3 year depreciation for luxury vehicles under $80k is the Acura RLX.

          Another model w/ huge depreciation is the LS 600h; and for SUV/CUVs, it’s the QX80 and QX60.

          The H/K models one will find on such lists would be the Cadenza (no surprise there) and the hybrid variants of the Sonata and Optima (again, no surprise there).

        • 0 avatar
          Train

          I’m guessing you’re counting the two figures on the right side of the decimal point in describing the job you “turned down.” I once “turned down” a job in major league baseball because some people there were making bad decisions. I suspect many others did the same.

  • avatar
    radudeATL

    Shame about that grille, because the rest looks moderately attractive.

    The Kia wins in my book.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    “(Full disclosure: Hyundai flew me to Idaho, offered a backpack and Google assistant I didn’t take, and fed and housed me for two nights.)”

    They could’ve thrown in a car wash too, no?

  • avatar

    Hyudai looks angrier and angrier with every new generation. Why is that? What it is so angry about?

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @ILO: Ask yourself why the Lexus looks like a Predator face;
      Ask yourself why American pickup trucks carry huge slaps of chrome for a grille;
      Ask yourself why nearly every brand of American car looks aggressively angry. It’s the style that, for now, the majority of people want. To me, they’re all hideous.

      One reason I bought the Chevy Colorado as my pickup is that it was the best-looking MID-sized pickup on the market and I simply didn’t want nor need a full sized truck. If I had, I’d have chosen the Ram, because it’s the only full sized truck that doesn’t have that slab-faced grille on it.

      • 0 avatar
        geo

        “Ask yourself why nearly every brand of American car looks aggressively angry.”

        Studies show that people want cars to resemble them. Ford, for example, foresaw the anger on the faces of their PowerShift customers and designed the front clip accordingly. That’s commendable.

  • avatar
    hifi

    The exterior design of this is a total mess. The Telluride, or any other modern SUV aside from Lexus, is much better looking than this. Kia is hitting it out of the park, but I’m not loving what Hyundai is doing lately.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    A recent road trip confirms that late-model Hyundai drivers have the crown for “most generally clueless drivers on the interstate.”

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Toyota/Lexus drivers by a long shot.

      There’s a reason why there is such a thing as the “Camry Dent Registry.”

      Plus, it seems like 70-75% of the time a vehicle is in the left lane holding up traffic, it’s someone in a Toyota/Lexus.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        If Toyotas were actually bought by people who drove worse than other car companies’ customers, they would carry an insurance premium. Nice try, shill.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          1. They tend to drive slower, so overall (serious) accident rate is down.

          2. That, however, doesn’t mean that they don’t have more than their fare share of dented bumpers (low speed collisions) of which it is not worth the hassle/cost of reporting it to the insurer and repairing the damage.

          There’s a reason why there are actual articles written about the “Camry Dent” or “Camry Corner,” much less having clubs/feeds on FB, Instagram, Twitter and the like.

          This is what the admin for the “Toyota Camry Dent Club Facebook group” told Jalopnik.

          “I finally asked someone who caused their dent and asked how they got it and it was from reversing and hitting another car. I think it has to be a combination of the bumper material and maybe even the driver’s view. I mean how can so many of the dents be on the drivers side? Before then I used to joke that it was just an initiation process of owning a Camry.”

          – And let’s not forget, Toyota/Lexus has a track record for placing blame on accidents on “driver error.”

          Don’t be so superficial in your “analysis”; doing so makes it way too easy to poke holes in it.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Insurance companies do superficial analysis while Jalopnik is a credible source of real numerical analytics. This is sarcasm, in case you’ve completely left sanity in your rear view mirror after too much time spent as a shill.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            What’s there for insurance companies to “analyze”?

            Again, when –

            1. Tend to drive SLOWER, so fewer (expensive) high collision accidents, and

            2. DON’T report the low speed collisions which end up w/ the dented rear bumpers, as not worth the hike in insurance rates.

            There’s no need for insurance rates to go up when such accidents are not reported and the insurer doesn’t have to pay out.

            This isn’t that difficult to comprehend…

            See that you totally overlooked T/L’s tendency to blame accidents on “driver error.”

      • 0 avatar

        Just opposite – Toyota/Lexus owners are considered smartest drivers on the road because they chose the best car made on this planet which will last until next aeon when all black holes evaporate and time scale cease to exist and Universe become conformally equivalent to the next Big Bang.

    • 0 avatar
      Train

      Yes, ALL older-model Hyundai drivers are clueless, except for this one guy in Wyoming. He’s clue-full…quite a driver. Rather amazing. Maybe you’ll see him on the road some day.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Finally saw a Kia Telluride on the road today: exact same car as in all the press photos, top trim in launch-color green. It looked handsome, imposing, and expensive…as it darn well should, for something touching 50 G’s with tax and Tru-Coat. Not quite as big as it looked in pix, but big enough for any task you’d throw at it.

    The exterior styling on this Hyundai Palisade version, on the other hand…ugh. What’s with the fake laugh lines next to the taillamps? The giant chrome H in the grill, as if you want people to think you spent less than you did? And inside, what’s with the giant console where your knee ought to go?

    Kudos to Hyundai for doing right by the suspension though.

  • avatar
    WalthamDan

    Over the weekend we stopped at the Hyundai store to look at the Palisade. Driving up and seeing the two they had from the back looked promising. The little extra trim added to the sides of each taillight made no sense though.

    Then we saw the front. Whoa Nellie. Dog alert! That entire grille needs to be redesigned and the thick grille surround reduced measurably. Ruins the look of the entire vehicle.

    Queue the incentives on this one Hyundai. Folks need to drive over to the local Kia store and purchase the Telluride instead.

  • avatar
    Illan

    please tell Hyundai to give you a clean one for Pictures. i saw one in black last friday and looks stunning in black. the grill is growing on me.

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