By on June 5, 2019

It’ll not have escaped your notice that neither the Dodge Charger nor the Challenger has made an appearance in this series. Why? Because we try (emphasis on try) to include models which we think have base trims that might very well be the best of the line. With 797-horsepower options on the table, it’s hard to make that argument for the Dodge.

But what about its Chrysler cousin? A well-timed and much appreciated email from a reader suggested the 300 Touring might make a good candidate, especially since deep discounts can be had just for asking. We don’t usually consider incentive spending in Ace of Base, but when that figure routinely touches 25 percent — or more — of sticker price, it’s difficult to ignore.

The base Touring model comes with FCA’s we-put-it-in-everything Pentastar V6. In this application, it makes just under 300 horsepower. Paired with the company’s excellent eight-speed automatic, the large sedan routinely returns econobox fuel efficiency … even your author’s nine-year old high-mile example can still touch 30 mpg on a long highway slog. For a big rear-drive car, that’s remarkable.

Despite the car being nearly fifteen years old, it still cuts a large-and-in-charge shape, with its upright grille and boxy proportions commanding attention. A $1,295 sport appearance package blacks out all the chromed plastic trim and adds visual menace, but the wise Ace of Base shopper will keep their money in their pocket. Seventeen-inch wheels wear modestly-sized 215/65 tires. Base models are offered in eight colors, all gratis. Ocean Blue Metallic is shown here.

Chrysler’s admittedly useful 8.4-inch Uconnect is standard these days, an infotainment device that used to be optional. Seats are black unheated cloth at this price but, if they’re anything like those found in the 2012 Charger, the material is so thick and robust it’ll probably outlive the car. It’s certainly held up well against the daily rigor of family service. Dual-zone climate control is also standard. There’s no sunroof but that only encroaches on headroom.

Anecdotally, dealers in some markets are advertising this machine in the ballpark of $18,500. This surely includes several rebates and incentive stacked on top of each other like cordwood, many of which would be impossible for the vast majority of the general public to redeem all at once. It surely doesn’t include freight, either. The sticker price is $29,220, by the way.

This leaves us with a question: given the deep discounts and potential for a low interest rate, should one spring for one of these or pop for a slightly used unit? That’s up to you and your unique situation. What is a surety, though, is that the base model Chrysler 300 makes a solid case for itself … until they offer a Hellcat engine in it.

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments and feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The model above is shown with American options and priced in American Dollars. Your dealer may sell for less – probably a lot less in this case

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81 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2019 Chrysler 300 Touring...”


  • avatar
    gtem

    The longer-in-tooth the LX cars get, the more I appreciate them. My one bone to pick: it feels fundamentally WRONG to have a 300 with a cloth interior, especially the nasty feeling crap almost all manufacturers have been using this decade. People always make fun of it as an embarrassing artifact, but the “mouse fur” in the final W-Impalas is vastly preferable to the coarse and/or neoprene-like crap everyone uses now. Toyotas had nice soft cloth until 2011 in the Camry. Subaru Outback/Legacy is also a notable exception in still having soft pleasant cloth. Any others?

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      it feels fundamentally WRONG to have a 300 with a cloth interior, especially the nasty feeling crap almost all manufacturers have been using this decade…

      YES I also feel that it is wrong to offer Buicks with cloth seats as well.

      I know that it is hot in the summer and cold in the winter but I’d respect manufactures more if the “mid-tier” brands would start with leatherette (something as MB-Tex as like as possible) with real leather as an upgrade.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I think a high-quality cloth would be nice in a Buick or Chrysler, but that’s not really what’s offered these days. It’s just there to get you to buy a “leather” upgrade.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I agree. There is nothing inherently cheap or downmarket about good quality velour. But what they’re offering as “cloth” these days? Yes it degrades the whole interior feel substantially. Carpet quality too: thin and weak with absolutely laughably little “pile” to it, the Japanese in particular are guilty. My ’96 ES300 excelled here, with very nice carpet trim reaching well up into the lower dash by your feet, and up the lower door panels.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I agree. I guess the cloth on the LX cars is okay for the sub-$30K price range (it never gave me any trouble FWIW) but it isn’t spectacular either. The cloth upholstery on something like my late 80s H-bodies or my Diplomat SE blows it out of the water.

      The cloth seats in the Armada still seem decent.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “The cloth seats in the Armada still seem decent.”

        Yes. As bizarre as it sounds, the cloth quality in the Armada SV is a standout feature in my mind, and a big part of its appeal to me (that and the rationally sized wheels, and the incredible value they present).

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Personally, I love me some old-school, whorehouse maroon crushed velour seats. The best cloth seats I’ve ever felt were in my old man’s ’80 Cordoba, I mean screw Kahn and his Greek leather when you’ve got material so soft it compares to house furniture. It did have the button tufts, but they were toned down compared to on a Cadillac or Lincoln.
      But I think they had to get away from these soft cloths because of us, and our penchant for wolfing down food in our cars. The newer cloths are harder and scratchier, but they can survive an ice cream bombing.
      MB-Tex was pretty good. Everyone should copy it.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      I don’t like leather seats. They make me me perspire. I would choose the Touring trim on the 300 specifically because that is the only trim with cloth seats.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Then we have Volvo, which not only gives you cloth seats, but makes them PLAID.

      https://www.wardsauto.com/sites/wardsauto.com/files/driver%20seats.jpg

      I absolutely love it! Not so sure about the rest of the car, though.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    The ONLY reason to buy any Chrysler sedan/coupe is for the raw rear-drive POWER. It’s difficult to make a case for any of the lessor-equipped cousins

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Our ’14 Avenger cloth is comfy and non-abrasive to your skin. All day in shorts with no issues type of cloth.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Big honking deal here. Great car – low price. Large and in charge and over 30 MPG.

    I love this car.

    Cloth seats? Go for a higher trim and get leather or the dealer will put leather in for $600. Problem solved.

    I like cloth. Dislike leather. Cloth is warm in the winter. Cooler in the summer.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

      Agreed, and for those who really want leather a Katzkin aftermarket package offers far better quality than what you’ll get with Chrysler’s mid-level leather upholstery. Not sure about the “Nappa” leather in the Limited and 300C.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    The small additional outlay for the Sport pkg is WELL worth it, the darkened trim and big “black chrome” wheels transform the look of the car. I know they are base model 6 cylinders but they never fail to turn my head. Get it in the green they introduced last year.

    Even with the Sport trim I was seeing them for very low $20k’s last year, a deal so amazing I had to drive one. It was “fine”, certainly comfy and composed, but knowing it was missing 2 cylinders I just could not pull the trigger. So I spent a lot more and bought a Hemi :)

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I’ve noticed that with the 300/Charger/Challenger. The MSRP price gap between the V6 and V8 is not that huge, the real world transaction price difference is quite substantial however.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        That’s because Chrysler doesn’t deal on the good stuff. I’ve been looking at Renegades to buy, but I’m only interested in the Trailhawk. Jeep is giving away the lessor Renegades for $7-8-9000 off sticker, but not the Trailhawk, $2000 off is the best I can do

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @Lie2Me, if you really want a price delta check dealer advertised prices on a V6 Durango v. a V8 model!

        • 0 avatar
          MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

          I had a loaner Renegade (midlevel 4×4) for 2 weeks last year, and somewhat liked it. Coulda used more power, but was smooth enough.

          As for “dealing on the good stuff”, I got 16 Grand off a brand new Hemi with every single possible option on it. There are not many other places I could leave my 30 Grand and come away with a nearly 400 HP V8, radar cruise, big screen nav, A/C seats, heated REAR seats, full LED lighting, big audio, etc.

  • avatar
    JMII

    I had one of these as a rental on a recent vacation. While still looking a bit gangster everything about it is excellent: power, mileage, comfort, visibility, handling, storage/trunk space, seats, infotainment, climate control, etc. Honestly its just a great all around car. It feels large but despite its size it didn’t create any real problems in a city environment (we were in Seattle). Highway cruising was a pleasure as it soaks up miles on less then perfect roads with no complaints. It is exactly what it claims to be: a true, full size, American RWD car. The base V6 moves it along nicely, surely the V8 would be even better and represents a more traditional choice. Our rental had nice grey wheels, heated leather seats and was the AWD “S” model.

    The only knock is the stupid drive selector you rotate. Sure it saves room on the console but a traditional gear stick you slide back and forth would be better. Twist to park just felt wrong, I was constantly doubling checking which gear it was in. I’m sure you would adapt over time, but pushing all the way forward to park is built-in habit. I also didn’t find any noticeable difference when the car was in “sport” mode or whatever S on the dial did. On most Hyundais I rent the sport button works wonders on tweaking the car slightly to drive more responsive in terms of steering, shifting and throttle response, so I found the 300 was disappointing in this regard.

    Given Ford and GM are pulling out of the car market Chrysler is offering the last true American car you can buy it seems. While this platform is ancient there is nothing wrong with it, thus they would wise to keep offering it to buyers that want a bigger vehicle but have no desire for an SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      PM300

      Re: sport mode, I find the exact opposite having had one over the last 3 years. There is a sport button on the dash as well as the general S on the shifter dial. Moving to S sharpens the transmission shifts, downshifts quicker, etc. Pressing the button on the dash increases throttle response a bit too harshly IMO so I never really used it.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

      The twist-dial transmission selector didn’t bother me on the 300 Limited (then the base level) I rented a couple of years ago in California, but I really, really missed the ability to downshift manually by just 1-2 gears while descending down I-15 from Victorville. Flicking the dial to the rightmost position (I can’t remember if it was “S” or “L”) made the car want to downshift into 3rd at freeway speeds – not ideal. Paddle shifters make this a non-issue on the 300S and 300C.

    • 0 avatar
      Lichtronamo

      FCA will soon be out of the car game too save for the Alfa Romeo as any replacement for the LX cars seems to be vaporware. The only way there are likely to be future Dodge or Chrysler badged cars is if there is a merger or acquisition. However, any potential partner would likely be looking to combine their stronger car offerings with RAM and Jeep. (Hello Hyundai/Kia)

  • avatar
    PM300

    As I get ready to send my 300 back to the dealership next month, this hits me right in the feels. As others have mentioned, it’s size, presence, power, and decent fuel economy sucked me in and it completely changed my opinion on FCA. It also helps I snagged it in 2016 with an employee discount for less than escape or fusion at the time. No such deals anymore as most are leasing close to $600/month now (the V6’s have horrible resale value) or I would have considered another one.

    After 35k miles, I found it eats tires (might be because it encourages bad driving habits :D) and has developed a few rattles/clunks. But overall it’s been stone cold reliable and I will definitely miss it. FWIW I have already replaced it with a 2019 Big Horn Ram and have been amazed by how much better the Ram acts as a big “car” than the 300. It has significantly more back seat room, way quieter on the highway, and same, if not better ride quality. I also average the same MPG on my commute although I know the 300 would 100 percent top the Ram during longer freeway journeys.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      That’s really interesting, what engine do you have in the Ram?

      • 0 avatar
        PM300

        3.6 engine still with 3.21 gears and it’s a 4×4. I’m averaging between 19 and 20 in the city with less than 1k miles on it so far.

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          Oddly, besides my experiences with them as rentals, this is what makes me want a 300/Charger. I had a Ram as a rental and my brother bought a 3.6/ 4×4 crew cab last year and he has enjoyed it immensely. He’s averaging about the same MPG and likes the truck more than any other one he has owned, which includes multiple F-150’s.

          • 0 avatar
            PM300

            My dad has acquired a new F-150 every 2-3 years since 1999 and have always been a fan but his 2019 cant come close to interior and ride quality of my Ram. His 2.7 crew cab 4×4 averages 18-19mpg in all city driving which I think is good for the power you get. It will dust my 3.6 Ram for sure. My dream truck would be a Ram with a 2.7 ecoboost but keep the ZF 8 speed lol I can only dream…

        • 0 avatar
          MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

          A “BIG HORN” V6 ??!?

          • 0 avatar
            PM300

            My boss and coworker have Hemis and one averages 14.5 mpg with a 60 mile round trip commute and the other gets a little over 16 but has a very light foot. Traded power for MPG, I have a “fun” car when I’m not surrounded by traffic and want to go faster.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    I think a 300S looks great, but the example photos in base trim do nothing for me, maybe it’s just the chosen colour.

    Can’t argue with the value, though.

  • avatar
    don1967

    There used to be plenty of hemi-powered CPO (aka “abused Hertz car”) 300s on the market. 50% depreciation on a nearly-new specimen was damn tempting, notwithstanding the aforementioned abuse as evidenced by the worn rear rubber.

    Alas, while the Pentastar is a decent engine it just doesn’t live up to the whole RWD gangsta image. Might as well get a Taurus or Maxima, and be honest about what you drive.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I have a 300S RWD V6. Great all around daily driver car. Good equipment level, looks nice with the S package, reasonably quick, handles well, and I AVERAGE 30mpg on my regular daily loop.

    • 0 avatar
      PM300

      You must set the cruise at 55 to AVERAGE 30mpg and/or not hit any lights. My wife has an easy freeway commute (opposite of traffic flow during rush hour) and does 25-26 with ours (same spec RWD 300S). When I was commuting I would get 18-19mpg in the winter and 20-21 average in the summer. 29-30mpg was easy doing 85+mph (Michigan has 75mph limits further north now) on longer trips and 32-34mpg keeping it closing to 70-75mph.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Average speed 55-60mph for 3/4 of the trip. A 5-6 mile stint at 75, then 35-40mph city streets for the rest. Around 5 stops for stop lights, a roundabout and a freeway interchange.

        • 0 avatar
          PM300

          Nice! Sounds optimal for our cars. I am in gridlock a lot on the way home (19 miles one way) and during the winter I do a lot of 10 minute remote starts combined with the cheaper winter blend fuel also dropped it a noticeable amount.

          I hope I didnt sound like I was complaining, I do think they are fuel efficient for what they are (a large car). I love getting the same MPG at 80 as my past car, a 2013 Focus, got :)

  • avatar
    redapple

    danio

    30 mpg day in day out in a car you wouldnt want any bigger.
    and the industry is wasting Billion$ to go to BEV no one wants thx to GOVT Laws.

  • avatar
    markmeup

    I realize that this is a discussion about a base/stripped model, but can I just say…

    I have a fully loaded, decked out 300 ‘S’ package and AWD. I love my car. and more than anything I’ve owned in a long time. mentioned this before, but the only ‘fault’ to me, is the dated dash & upper door panel material/design that IMHO should have been redone/upgraded with the 2015 refresh.

    a 4500 large, comfortable, stand out and unique-looking sedan, plenty of power/torque and on road trips to visit family, still gets 29-31mpg crazy. 300S= awesomeness. here she is ——>>

    http://tinypic.com/r/xefz1v/9

    It was much because of DW here,that I opened up and went to investigate this particular car back then. so glad i bought one.

    since you’re car guys, WTH, here’s the ’79 Cadillac too(with self-done, fully restored & functioning OEM Bosch/Bendix MPEFI system)> http://gyroscopeit.com/cadillac/pictures/MA49F3208-F415-A84F-7CDCB7E9E825E1C5.jpg

    .

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    I have to say, these cars drive really well in every trim level I’ve driven. The same is true for the Charger. Even with the softest suspension option they handle/corner better than I would expect, given the OE tire choice and sizes. The LX/LD platform seems to work well.

    It would be hard for me to buy either with a V6, knowing that there are an array of V8 options available, but for an affordable new family car, this would be great. I still have concerns about Chrysler quality overall, but I believe that the big cars and trucks are what they do best, and the pieces that might rattle or fall off are probably not crucial for the powertrain.

    I

    • 0 avatar
      markmeup

      I had the V8 in the 1st RWD 300S, of course it was great (not on fuel though)…. my new one (above) is an AWD so by force, the V6. honestly, i couldn’t be happier. the performance, let alone economy is unreal.

      to note, for anyone looking at my 300, i did upgrade the summer wheels/tires (shown) to 20″ as my RWD came with. makes a huge diff in finished appearance and ride is tight & smooth (the standard AWD ‘S’ looks bit clunky with the included 19″s and flatish FWD-look wheels) and i went w/little extra meat (no rubber-bands) on tires for potholes etc as im in urban setting.

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        I very much agree on the stock wheels for AWD 300/Chall/Charger – none look quite right to me. Yours is perfect.

        • 0 avatar
          markmeup

          thanks! i went thru hell with OEM + 2 other sets wheels prior to final, of design, offset’s etc before i got it just right.

          these are MRR GF9’s 20×8.5 I believe perfect offset was= +42 all around

          tires: 255/45/20

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I was looking at comfy commuters a few years ago, having driven my wife’s Camry out to the dealerships. A Charger SXT was my favorite in terms of powertrain (3.6/8A), ride and handling. But the disappointing thing is it gave up both interior room and trunk room to the smaller Camry, and the sightlines were a bit too bunkered-in for my liking. Still, if I were in the market right now, it would be at the top of my list.

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        Funny I also have a Camry (XLE) and really like that car as well. Bought to be a kid’s car but I am thinking I may not wanna turn loose of it :)

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I hope they keep making these, as I seem to appreciate cushy NA V6 RWD full size sedans more than I used to. I’d look to one of these of a used Genesis or M37/56 in a heartbeat
    My only gripe is the ride height on AWD models is ridiculous

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I assume you meant to type ‘over’ a Genesis or Infiniti?

      That’s where I’d vehemently disagree. As much as I like the butch looks and old-school-but-solid bones of the LXes that will probably keep them reasonable to keep running for a long time, the ’15+ iteration of the Genesis is just on a wholly different playing field in terms of quality. I like the LXes, but the 2nd gens Genesis sedans are right up there as cars I’m keeping a close eye on for a future ride.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    I like the car. But the fact remains that Chrysler’s quality is all over the place-and isn’t there some Mercedes under neath? If so, I would think when this model is discontinued (and we know it’s coming) keeping one for a long time could be a bleak prospect.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      There haven’t been many horror stories with LX cars since their inception… and the Mercedes-related components are absolutely rock solid actually.

      • 0 avatar
        CKNSLS Sierra SLT

        gtem-

        Maybe they are rock solid because they are older components. Because Mercedes ranks about the middle in (2018) initial quality.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Yes we’re talking circa 1997 W210. Solid stuff, my cousin had 500k KM of Siberian roads on his ‘98 E320. 5g tropic transmission is a tank, same for the driveline and suspension. LX front ends are a bit weak however.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        The weak spots on the LX and LC cars is the front end. My ’08 Charger R/T was eating up the left front tire when I traded it in on my ’10 Challenger R/T, which itself needed repairs almost every single year due to the crater filled Toledo streets. It’s not really the car’s fault, but it is the weak spot, as I had only minor issues on my Challenger for the almost 8 years I had it, other then the front end repairs. My ’18 Challenger Scatpack made it through this last winter intact, with no damage to anything, and is, hands down, my favorite car, of any I’ve owned.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      There are hundreds of thousands of these cars (all LXs) still out there. They’ve enjoyed a massive and passionate fan base since day one. What you’re looking at is a modern day version of the Tri-Five Chevies in that the LX is an attractive in all versions, easily upgradeable platform that offers something for everyone from a casual fan who wants more than basic transportation, to customizers, hot rodders, on up to hardcore racers. The Challenger will obviously be the most popular and relevant as time goes on but that will filter to all LX’s. The only thing I see becoming unobtanium are interior parts but I’m confident that 3D printing technology will have you covered. Due to their customer base, I see a LOT of well kept 300’s back to ‘05s. Even Hemis are often clean and reasonably priced if high mileage. I wouldn’t be afraid of one if it all checks out. Im 3 years in with my ‘09 Challenger R/T. It’s now got 41K (bought with 17K) and the only issue has been with that dumb push button ignition.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “Due to their customer base, I see a LOT of well kept 300’s back to ‘05s. ”

        Does NOT compute lol.

        I’d more so say:

        “Due to their customer base, I see decreasingly few well kept 300s back to 05s”

        • 0 avatar
          MoparRocker74

          There’s definitely a demographic of these, V6 Magnums and some early low end Chargers that get subjected to ugly blinged out DUBs, goofy grilles and trashy stick on chrome trinkets. Those are also run into the ground as one would expect. In my area at least, attrition has claimed many of the donkers. I see MANY of these in nice shape.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    This review had me seriously contemplating a 300. Until I checked out the Chrysler Canada website. 300 Touring MSRP starting at $42,045 Cdn. Well outside ofthe $18,500 USD that Matthew mentions. Even with a hefty discount and rebates the Canadian pricing still places the 300 into a range where the competition is much more competent and prestigious.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    So, we can buy a Hertz or Enterprise, (or even via Carmax) former rental 2018 300S with leather and 25k miles for around $21,000, or a brand new 2019 base with cloth seats and full warranty for about about $20k.

    Sometimes, buying new makes more sense… and this is one of those times. Both are great values though.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I’ve had a few 300’s/ Chargers as rentals. Each time, I come away impressed with the cars, even though they are ancient now. I don’t care for any of them pre-2012 (2011) refresh because the interiors were hideously awful and the high beltline styling was prominent. The refreshed cars are to me, much more refined inside and out.

    I could see putting my own money on a Charger or 300. If I get tired of my VW and can’t find an Alfa Guilia I want, I’d have no problem going to FCA for a big ol’ sedan. I just don’t need a car that large and I enjoy the hatchback versatility of the VW versus a trunk.

    Plus, an LX car wouldn’t really fit in my garage with the minivan. But now that the Mustang has taken that spot…

  • avatar
    ajla

    My Charger had a lot of annoying electric and fit/finish problems over 50k miles but they are still fun cars. Even more than the V8 power my favorite thing about the LX is that they are gloriously RWD. The driving experience really hooked me on that configuration for future purchases.
    I can’t really speak to the V6 or AWD versions though.

    • 0 avatar
      markmeup

      as stated above, i’ve owned both HEMI RWD and now V6 AWD 300S the AWD system is prob the finest i’ve ever experienced.

      its bulletproof proven transfer case, with modern automatic/ intuitive setup that effortlessly engages or disengages the AWD based on weather condition, slippage and/or temperature. if wipers ON, assume’s not ideal conditions then and it comes on for added safety. if under approx 36° is activated. begin driving again with wipers off or temps above 36 and it shuts itself off. The Pentastar V6 combined with the ZF-8 is wonderful, with or w/o AWD engaged.

      To note, the AWD transfer case does invade a bit of space in the front passenger-side foot-well, to the left off of the trans hump. but plenty of room still for passenger’s legs/feet in there.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Only driven Chargers.

    Agreed, they are very good cars. Ride and handling above what I ever expected.

    One rental had the HEMI. I spent 30 minutes just to cruise the local highway with 55mph speed limits and a lot of stop lights. I could listen to the V8 all day long.

    Only real beef was the cheap-ish (but not terrible) interior, and the switch on the HEMI from V8 to 4 cylinders changed the exhaust hum and vibration just enough it was noticeable to me. If you’re a space-out kinda driver you’d probably never even know what I was talking about.

    I kinda want one of these.

  • avatar
    Ryan

    I honestly didn’t know the C300 was still being built.


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